Crap Detection
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11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation

11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation | Crap Detection | Scoop.it
In this day and age, where anyone with access to the internet can create a website, it is critical that we as educators teach our students how to evaluate web content. There are some great resources available for educating students on this matter, such as Kathy Schrock’s Five W’s of Website Evaluation or the University of Southern Maine’s Checklist for Evaluating Websites.

 

Along with checklists and articles, you will also find wonderfully funny hoax websites, aimed at testing readers on their ability to evaluate websites. These hoax sites are a great way to bring humor and hands-on evaluation into your classroom, and test your students’ web resource evaluation IQ!"


Via Lisa Purvin Oliner, Aulde de B
Lisa Purvin Oliner's curator insight, September 15, 2013 3:43 PM

Priming the 'Research Imagination' and How Critical is Too Critical?

 

As educators, we must effectively verbalize why the research projects we assign, and the associated lessons, are so vital to a useful education. Arjun Appadurai's 2006 article "The Right to Research" in the Globalisation, Societies and Education journal argues "that it is worth regarding research as a right, albeit of a special kind" (Appadurai, 2006, p. 167). He has an interesting perspective with regard to ownership of research and the common man's capacity, as well as prerogative, to carry out 'disciplined inquiries' that push our knowledge boundaries. He cites four reasons for taking this stance: a) destabilization of secure knowledge niches in an age of rapid change, b) lost reliance on traditional, customary or local sources of knowledge, c) loss of security that makes rumor, fiction, propaganda, anecdote virtually impossible to distinguish from knowledge, facts, news, trends, and finally, d) recognition of the latter is vital "for the exercise of informed citizenship" (p. 168). 

 

Furthermore, Appadurai outlines a knowledge hierarchy of sorts with the top 20% being the only members privileged with career options and a capacity for meta-knowledge about high-end scholarship that he calls the "global elite" (p. 168). However, Appadurai's argument is built around the approximately 1.5 billion people in the world who fall within the "global knowledge societies" but whose membership within is insecure because of "partial education, inadequate social capital, poor connectivity, political weakness and economic insecurity" (p. 168). He believes this group should claim its right to "the tools through which any citizen can systematically increase that stock of knowledge which they consider most vital to their survival as human beings and to their claims as citizens" (p. 168). Essentially, Appadurai attempts to establish a clear need to deparochialize the very idea of research and argues for regular people to claim their democratic right to citizenship by gaining "strategic knowledge". 

 

For these reasons, it is critical that our students know how to evaluate web content effectively, but also learn to enjoy the exploration and process of discernment. They need to establish their own systematic approach to gathering evidence from the multitude of websites that appear in searches but that proliferate nonsense. For instance, "Kathy Schrock's Five W's of Website Evaluation" or "The University of Southern Maine's Checklist for Evaluating Websites" on Teachbytes cannot be automatically considered a research safe-zone simply because it appears to be associated with a university or because it is posted on a content curation site (i.e. Scoop.it). To be truly discerning and remain within the top percentile of "global knowledge societies", one must question everything but not summarily eliminate sources based on a single grammar usage issue (like W’s). In fact, Appadurai's article may be overlooked completely by some western thinkers simply because of the spelling of "Globalisation" which is part of the journal’s title. A great deal relies on what individual citizens believe should be considered, as Appadurai put it, vital to their survival as human beings.

 

Appadurai, A. (2006). The right to research. Globalization, societies and education. 4(2) pp. 167-177. Online: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

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Power Searching with Google – Inside Search – Google

Power Searching with Google – Inside Search – Google | Crap Detection | Scoop.it

Google is offering a course on Power Searching. This course was offered over the summer and provides an opportunity to help you become a better search. "This is an online, community-based course showcasing search techniques and how you can use them to solve real, everyday problems. Dan Russell, a senior research scientist at Google, will cover topics that will help you:

* Find just what you’re looking for, faster

* Get right to the most credible sources

* Solve even the most challenging questions

You can find additional information and register by clicking through to the site.


Via Beth Dichter
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11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation

11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation | Crap Detection | Scoop.it
In this day and age, where anyone with access to the internet can create a website, it is critical that we as educators teach our students how to evaluate web content. There are some great resources available for educating students on this matter, such as Kathy Schrock’s Five W’s of Website Evaluation or the University of Southern Maine’s Checklist for Evaluating Websites.

 

Along with checklists and articles, you will also find wonderfully funny hoax websites, aimed at testing readers on their ability to evaluate websites. These hoax sites are a great way to bring humor and hands-on evaluation into your classroom, and test your students’ web resource evaluation IQ!"


Via Lisa Purvin Oliner, Aulde de B
Lisa Purvin Oliner's curator insight, September 15, 2013 3:43 PM

Priming the 'Research Imagination' and How Critical is Too Critical?

 

As educators, we must effectively verbalize why the research projects we assign, and the associated lessons, are so vital to a useful education. Arjun Appadurai's 2006 article "The Right to Research" in the Globalisation, Societies and Education journal argues "that it is worth regarding research as a right, albeit of a special kind" (Appadurai, 2006, p. 167). He has an interesting perspective with regard to ownership of research and the common man's capacity, as well as prerogative, to carry out 'disciplined inquiries' that push our knowledge boundaries. He cites four reasons for taking this stance: a) destabilization of secure knowledge niches in an age of rapid change, b) lost reliance on traditional, customary or local sources of knowledge, c) loss of security that makes rumor, fiction, propaganda, anecdote virtually impossible to distinguish from knowledge, facts, news, trends, and finally, d) recognition of the latter is vital "for the exercise of informed citizenship" (p. 168). 

 

Furthermore, Appadurai outlines a knowledge hierarchy of sorts with the top 20% being the only members privileged with career options and a capacity for meta-knowledge about high-end scholarship that he calls the "global elite" (p. 168). However, Appadurai's argument is built around the approximately 1.5 billion people in the world who fall within the "global knowledge societies" but whose membership within is insecure because of "partial education, inadequate social capital, poor connectivity, political weakness and economic insecurity" (p. 168). He believes this group should claim its right to "the tools through which any citizen can systematically increase that stock of knowledge which they consider most vital to their survival as human beings and to their claims as citizens" (p. 168). Essentially, Appadurai attempts to establish a clear need to deparochialize the very idea of research and argues for regular people to claim their democratic right to citizenship by gaining "strategic knowledge". 

 

For these reasons, it is critical that our students know how to evaluate web content effectively, but also learn to enjoy the exploration and process of discernment. They need to establish their own systematic approach to gathering evidence from the multitude of websites that appear in searches but that proliferate nonsense. For instance, "Kathy Schrock's Five W's of Website Evaluation" or "The University of Southern Maine's Checklist for Evaluating Websites" on Teachbytes cannot be automatically considered a research safe-zone simply because it appears to be associated with a university or because it is posted on a content curation site (i.e. Scoop.it). To be truly discerning and remain within the top percentile of "global knowledge societies", one must question everything but not summarily eliminate sources based on a single grammar usage issue (like W’s). In fact, Appadurai's article may be overlooked completely by some western thinkers simply because of the spelling of "Globalisation" which is part of the journal’s title. A great deal relies on what individual citizens believe should be considered, as Appadurai put it, vital to their survival as human beings.

 

Appadurai, A. (2006). The right to research. Globalization, societies and education. 4(2) pp. 167-177. Online: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

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Glean - Information Literacy Lessons and Tools

Glean - Information Literacy Lessons and Tools | Crap Detection | Scoop.it

Glean Learning Tools help practitioners teach information literacy, data literacy, digital literacy and network literacy to learners.


Via John Dalziel
Brittany Currans's insight:

network literacy

John Dalziel's curator insight, November 19, 2013 4:33 PM

Glean Learning Tools are free...
- science,
- math and
- information literacy teaching tools produced by Public Learning Media, Inc., to help teach digital literacy components.

Kelty Resource Centre's curator insight, August 4, 2016 1:25 AM
Has a good graphic re CRAP test towards end of video. 
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Crap Detection 101 | City Brights: Howard Rheingold | an SFGate.com blog

Crap Detection 101 | City Brights: Howard Rheingold | an SFGate.com blog | Crap Detection | Scoop.it

Learning the basics of online crap detection from Howard Reingold


Via Suzie Nestico
Brittany Currans's insight:

The basics of crap detection from the great Howard

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Do employers want information literacy skills? | CILIP

Do employers want information literacy skills? | CILIP | Crap Detection | Scoop.it
Do employers want information literacy skills? http://t.co/Rs4zVLl55P via @sharethis
Brittany Currans's insight:

I would hope so if they want their business to thrive.

 

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Four Helpful Web Search Strategy Tutorials

Four Helpful Web Search Strategy Tutorials | Crap Detection | Scoop.it

"Vaughn Memorial Library at Acadia University hosts four free animated tutorials designed to teach lessons on web research strategies. The four tutorials are Credible Sources Count, Research It Right, Searching With Success, and You Quote It, You Note It."


Via Beth Dichter
Maryalice Leister's curator insight, September 20, 2013 8:43 PM

Research/web searches don't come naturally to young learners and these tutorials form a foundation on which teachers can build. excellent and worth checking out.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, September 22, 2013 8:29 PM

This is a helpful share from Richard Byrne's site Free Tech 4 Teachers.  I encourage all educators to add this resource site to aid in the development/strenthening of student searching skills. 

Sue Alexander's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:28 AM

just can't have too many tools in our 1:1 toolbox. These are aimed at intermediate and middle grades. Thanks Beth for another helpful Scoop!

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Hoax or No Hoax? Strategies for Online Comprehension and Evaluation - ReadWriteThink

Hoax or No Hoax? Strategies for Online Comprehension and Evaluation - ReadWriteThink | Crap Detection | Scoop.it
Are your students easily fooled? You’ll find out in this lesson in which students carefully and critically examine hoax websites to determine their validity.

Via Mary Reilley Clark
Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, December 13, 2012 3:19 PM

Great lessons for teachers, librarians or library staff.

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Crap Detection Mini-Course | Howard Rheingold

Crap Detection Mini-Course | Howard Rheingold | Crap Detection | Scoop.it
Crap Detection Mini-Course - by @hreingold http://t.co/pY38jrDMEs
Brittany Currans's insight:

Just in case you need the basics a little faster

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How's Your Bullshit Detector? | The Smirking Chimp

How's Your Bullshit Detector? | The Smirking Chimp | Crap Detection | Scoop.it

With a title like this, I think I ought to dispense with the rhetorical amenities and come straight to the point. For those of you who do not know, it may be worth saying that the phrase, "crap-detecting," originated with Ernest Hemingway who when asked if there were one quality needed, above all others, to be a good writer, replied, "Yes, a built-in, shock-proof, crap detector."

As I see it, the best things schools can do for kids is to help them learn how to distinguish useful talk from bullshit.


Via Suzie Nestico
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Information Literacy: Credit vs. One-Shot

Information Literacy: Credit vs. One-Shot | Crap Detection | Scoop.it
How would you answer this question? Which is better, one-shot sessions or credit courses in information literacy? I think a good number of librarians would heartily agree that credit courses are th...
Brittany Currans's insight:

This would be an interesting concept. A good way to help learn information crap detection skills...

 

#scoopitaway

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