Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning
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Tech Startups Ditch the Office for Far-Flung Bonding Trips

Tech Startups Ditch the Office for Far-Flung Bonding Trips | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
“The genie is out of the bottle for remote work and if we wanted to bring everyone back to headquarters I don’t think it’s doable,” he said. Making that mistake “is how you lose your best employees.”
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 As the world reopens, many startups are choosing to keep their workforce remote. Their employees may not want to resume tedious commutes or rigid office schedules, but many still yearn for the deeper relationships with colleagues that used to be formed in the office. Some startup CEOs say they are crafting frequent & elaborate all-employee trips that are strictly for fun. It’s a spin on the old “off-site,” when offices gathered somewhere outside the corporate campus to hear about company goals & make plans to improve sales performance, capped off by some wining and dining.

 

Oleg Rogynskyy’s business-software company, People.ai Inc., closed its San Francisco HQ, closed most satellite offices & scrapped plans for another office in London to go permanently remote during the pandemic. He is taking 85% of his 2019 real-estate lease budget & investing it in employee perks, including one trip for the full staff of more than 200 & four trips that employees will take in smaller teams. “The genie is out of the bottle for remote work and if we wanted to bring everyone back to headquarters I don’t think it’s doable,” he said. Making that mistake “is how you lose your best employees.”

 

 

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Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning
Welcome to the site that captures my readings in my core areas of Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic COVID-19 Planning as well as general topics that catch my attention. I am interested in so many things besides my work - the environment, travel, health, women, trends, the planet, animals, birds and creatures of all kinds!  I can't help it - I am deeply curious about life!
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Florida Leads U.S. in Covid-19 Cases as Hospitalizations Surge

Florida Leads U.S. in Covid-19 Cases as Hospitalizations Surge | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
The number of people hospitalized in Florida has risen to the highest since late February, propelled by the spread of the Delta variant, large numbers of unvaccinated, few preventive measures and more indoor time to escape the heat.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 #Florida is recording more Covid19 cases than any US state, as hospitalizations in some areas increase at the fastest rate since the start of the pandemic. The state accounts for 1 in 5 new infections & logged 67,413 cases over the past week. FL had 314 cases per 100,000 people over the past week, second only to Louisiana. The weekly total of new cases reported by FL jumped more than fourfold between July 1 - 22, reaching its highest point since mid-January.a

Epidemiologists say various factors are at play: large numbers of unvaccinated people, a relaxation of preventive measures like mask-wearing & distancing, the spread of #delta & the congregation of people indoors during hot summer months.

The number of people hospitalized in FL has climbed steeply over the past month, reaching 3,849 on July 17, the largest since late February. Patients are skewing younger, with 53% under age 60, compared with 30% at the start of 2021.

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They Waited, They Worried, They Stalled. This Week, They Got the Shot. - The New York Times

They Waited, They Worried, They Stalled. This Week, They Got the Shot. - The New York Times | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
The U.S. vaccine rollout has plateaued and the course of the coronavirus pandemic in this country may depend on how many people are ultimately swayed to get vaccinated.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 On a single day this past week, more than half a million people across the #US trickled into high school gymnasiums, pharmacies & buses converted into mobile clinics. Then they pushed up their sleeves and got their COVID #vaccine. These are the Americans who are being vaccinated at this moment in the pandemic: the reluctant, the anxious, the procrastinating.

The people being vaccinated now are not members of the eager crowds who rushed to early appointments. But they are not in the group firmly opposed to vaccinations, either. Instead, they occupy a middle ground: They have been unwilling to receive a vaccine, until something or someone — a persistent family member, a work requirement, a growing sense that the shot was safe — convinced them otherwise.

How many people ultimately join this group, and how quickly, could determine the course of the pandemic in the US.

 

 

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C.D.C. Warns of Superbug Fungus Outbreaks in 2 Cities - The New York Times

C.D.C. Warns of Superbug Fungus Outbreaks in 2 Cities - The New York Times | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
For the first time, the C.D.C. identified several cases of Candida auris that were resistant to all drugs, in two health facilities in Texas and a long-term care center in Washington, D.C.
Regina Phelps's insight:

As foretold, the emergence of drug resistant superbugs - this one a fungus. A deadly, hard-to-treat fungal infection that has been spreading through nursing homes & hospitals across the US is becoming even more dangerous,with several cases in which the fungus, Candida auris, was completely impervious to all existing medication.

The finding, rby the #CDC is an alarming development in the evolution of C. auris, a tenacious yeast infection discovered in Japan in 2009 that has since spread across much of the world. The bug has spread even more widely during the #pandemic, with overwhelmed hospitals & nursing homes struggling to keep up with the surveillance & control measures needed to contain local outbreaks.The CDC reported that five of more than 120 cases of C. auris were resistant to all treatments.

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Canada to Reopen Border for Fully Vaccinated U.S. Tourists in August

Canada to Reopen Border for Fully Vaccinated U.S. Tourists in August | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
The Canadian government said it would allow fully vaccinated Americans to enter the country for recreational or tourist activities beginning Aug. 9, more than a year after Covid-19 restrictions first closed the 5,500-mile border to most travelers.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Good news! #Canada said it would allow fully vaccinated Americans to enter the country for recreational or tourist activities beginning Aug. 9, after a year. The government said that border restrictions for fully vaccinated travelers from other countries could also be lifted beginning Sept. 7, assuming Canada’s Covid-19 caseload stays relatively low.

 

American citizens and permanent residents will need to provide proof of their full vaccination status, with their last dose taking place at least two weeks before their arrival, and must not have any Covid-19 symptoms. They will also be required to present evidence of an approved negative Covid-19 test taken within 72 hours of their arrival in Canada. Officials said that starting Aug. 9, they won’t require follow-up tests from people who are fully vaccinated unless they are selected for random testing.

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Indiana University Can Require Covid-19 Vaccines, Federal Judge Says

Indiana University Can Require Covid-19 Vaccines, Federal Judge Says | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
A federal court ruling dealt a setback to a growing legal effort against compulsory Covid-19 inoculation at public educational institutions.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 A federal judge has ruled that Indiana University may require its students to submit proof of Covid-19 vaccination before returning to campus this fall, dealing a setback to a brewing legal effort against vaccination requirements in higher ed. In a 101-page decision handed down Sunday, US District Judge Damon Leichty said the university system acted reasonably to protect public health when it required all of its students, faculty & staff to be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 by July 1, with limited medical and religious exceptions.

In saying so, the judge denied an injunction sought by 8 college & graduate students who claimed the university’s vaccine policy unconstitutionally infringes on their bodily autonomy & medical privacy. The case is among the first to tackle the constitutionality of Covid-19 vaccine requirements at public universities.

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L.A.’s Fully-Vaccinated People Made Up 1-in-5 Infections - Bloomberg

L.A.’s Fully-Vaccinated People Made Up 1-in-5 Infections - Bloomberg | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Los Angeles County’s top health official said fully vaccinated people made up one-in-five Covid-19 infections in June and warned that the figure may rise in July with a higher level of community transmission.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 #LACounty’s top health official said fully vaccinated people made up one-in-five Covid-19 infections in June & warned that the figure may rise in July with a higher level of community transmission.

Those who have had the full dose of the vaccines made up 20% of cases last month, up from 11% in May. The percentage also climbed as more people were inoculated, increasing the base of fully-vaccinated residents. The “vast majority” of those vaccinated who tested positive had no symptoms or very mild illness, said Barbara Ferrer, the DPH director.

 

“We had a significant increase in the number of people who were fully vaccinated & tested positive,” Ferrer said in a briefing Thursday. “The numbers can go up again in July, until we get the community transmission back in control.”

 

 

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Surgeon General Reveals He’s Lost 10 Relatives To Covid As He Campaigns Against Vaccine Misinformation

Surgeon General Reveals He’s Lost 10 Relatives To Covid As He Campaigns Against Vaccine Misinformation | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy released an “urgent warning” Thursday about the dangers of vaccine misinformation.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 US Surgeon General Dr Vivek Murthy made a personal appeal to the American public, revealing 10 of his family members have died of Covid-19, as he issued an urgent warning about the dangers of vaccine misinformation. He is fighting the good fight and calling it out of the darkness.

Murthy delved into these threats in the 22-page advisory released Thursday morning. The stark statement warned of the tangible impacts of misinformation, leading people to resist safety measures like mask wearing, turn down proven treatments and choose not to get vaccinated. “Simply put: health misinformation has cost us lives,” Murthy said. The surgeon general in his notice called for an “all-of society approach” to combat the issue, urging social media companies to crack down on bad actors, individuals to share correct information with their friends and family offline, and health organizations to take a more proactive approach to stamping out false claims.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said during the press conference that 65% of anti-vaccine misinformation on social media platforms is coming from just 12 people. “All of them remain active on Facebook despite some being banned on other platforms, including ones that Facebook owns,

 

 

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Are Latent Viruses Causing Long Covid-19 Symptoms? Patient Groups Push for Testing

Are Latent Viruses Causing Long Covid-19 Symptoms? Patient Groups Push for Testing | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
More long Covid-19 patients are pushing to investigate what they believe is fueling some of their debilitating long-term symptoms: dormant viruses that have been reactivated by Covid-19.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Do reactivated viruses in your body contributed to #longcovid? Most people—whether they have had Covid19 or not—have dormant, usually harmless viruses in their body. Herpes family of viruses are common: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) which causes mononucleosis, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), which causes the common childhood illness, the herpes simplex viruses, & herpes zoster, a reactivation of the chickenpox that can cause shingles. Such viruses can be reactivated at times by stress, including infections.

Some long Covid19 patients & advocacy groups are urging doctors to test more regularly for reactivated viruses. With so few treatment options for long Covid19, they say, it makes sense to see if a herpes antiviral drug might relieve symptoms.

In June, a study published in the medical journal Pathogens suggested a possible association between EBV reactivations & long Covid-19. In a set of 30 long Covid19 patients, about 67% were positive for EBV reactivation compared with 10% of the control group, who had contracted Covid19 but didn’t experience long-term symptoms. The researchers tested for reactivation based on the levels of two antibodies they say are associated with active or reactivated EBV infection.

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Indonesia’s Hospitals Overflow With Covid-19 Patients as Gravediggers Work Into the Night

Indonesia’s Hospitals Overflow With Covid-19 Patients as Gravediggers Work Into the Night | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
A devastating coronavirus surge fueled by the Delta variant is tearing through the country and much of the largely unvaccinated developing world.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 #Indonesia is struggling under the current COVID surge. Cases & deaths have climbed rapidly in Indonesia in recent weeks, as  #Delta has helped fuel a devastating surge that echoes the one that tore through #India in the spring. Daily cases hit a record on Thursday with 56,757 new cases reported, along with 982 deaths, according to the country’s health ministry. Uneven global vaccination levels have driven a divergence. The virus is reaching new peaks in much of the developing world, which is struggling to import enough vaccine doses. Meanwhile, life is beginning to return to something approaching normal in places such as the #US & #UK where higher immunization rates are keeping hospitalizations down despite cases linked to the Delta variant surging.

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COVID Vaccines Will Not Reach Poorest Countries Until 2023

COVID Vaccines Will Not Reach Poorest Countries Until 2023 | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 This is another reminder that this is far from over. Most people in the poorest countries will need to wait another two years before they are vaccinated against COVID19, researchers have told Nature.

Around 11 billion doses are needed to fully vaccinate 70% of the world’s population against COVID19. As of 4 July, 3.2 billion doses had been administered. At the current vaccination rate, this will increase to around six billion doses by the end of the year, researchers from IMF based in Washington DC, project.

But so far, more than 80% of the doses have gone to people in high-income and upper-middle-income countries. Only 1% of people in low-income countries have been given at least one dose.

The virus will continue to spread and mutate and more dangerous variants will likely occur. We still have a long way to go.

Mehrban Chawla's curator insight, July 15, 7:28 AM
By then they might have developed herd immunity. Vaccines might not be needed then. It is time to implement OPD treatment as proposed my Dr. Peter McCullough. Check out https://youtu.be/QAHi3lX3oGM

kaylarcampbell79@gmail.com's curator insight, July 16, 11:39 PM
This is saddening with the fact that most places are going to require it to travel and forces them to stay in their country. This also doesn't give them the same medical treatment we do just because the U.S has more money/
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REvil, Hacking Group Behind Major Ransomware Attack, Disappears - The New York Times

REvil, Hacking Group Behind Major Ransomware Attack, Disappears - The New York Times | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
REvil, blamed for some of the most audacious attacks on the United States, suddenly cannot be found — even their negotiations with victims stopped. It is unclear if Russia or America disabled them.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#cybersecurity Days after Pres. Biden called Pres. Putin & demanded that he act to shut down ransomware groups that are attacking American targets, the biggest of them has gone off-line. The mystery is who made that happen. #REvil, short for “Ransomware evil,” is believed responsible for the attack that brought down JBS & took credit for a hack that affected thousands of businesses around the world over the July 4 holiday. Describing his ultimatum to Putin.  Mr. Biden said “we expect them to act,” & when asked later if he would take down the group’s servers if  Putin did not, the president simply said, “Yes.”

On Tuesday at 1AM the group’s sites on the dark web suddenly disappeared. Gone was the publicly-available “happy blog’’ that the group maintained, listing its victims & internet security groups said the custom-made sites where victims negotiate with REvil over how much they will pay to get their data unlocked were also missing.

Who done it??? Them or US?

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F.D.A. Will Attach Warning of Rare Nerve Syndrome to Johnson & Johnson Vaccine - The New York Times

F.D.A. Will Attach Warning of Rare Nerve Syndrome to Johnson & Johnson Vaccine - The New York Times | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Federal regulators found that the risk of developing the syndrome was low, but three to five times higher among Johnson & Johnson vaccine recipients than the general population.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 The #FDA is planning to warn that J&J #vaccine can lead to an increased risk of a rare neurological condition known as #GuillainBarré syndrome, another setback for a vaccine that has largely been sidelined in the #US because of manufacturing problems & a temporary safety pause earlier this year. Although regulators have found that the chances of developing the condition are low, they appear to be three to five times higher among recipients of the J&J vaccine than among the general population in the US. Federal officials have identified roughly 100 suspected cases of Guillain-Barré disease among recipients of the J&J shot through a federal monitoring system that relies on patients & health care providers to report adverse effects of vaccines. The reports are considered preliminary. Most people who develop the condition recover.

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Delta Variant’s Surge Puts Europe’s Summer Reopening at Risk

Delta Variant’s Surge Puts Europe’s Summer Reopening at Risk | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
The strain’s fast spread is prompting authorities to reintroduce restrictions, fueling fears that a new wave of infections in continental Europe could disrupt the region’s summer reopening.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Summer trip to #Europe? Maybe not. The fast spread of #Delta in #Spain & some other parts of #EU is prompting authorities to reintroduce restrictions, fueling fears that a new wave of infections could disrupt the region’s summer reopening. Infections in Spain are rising mainly among young people, who are largely unvaccinated fed by parties, trips & festivals. Delta has quickly spread in #Portugal & the south of #France too. The highly contagious variant is threatening to spoil the summer for Europe’s south, whose economies depend on tourists from across Europe, US & elsewhere. EU countries recently lifted quarantine requirements for travelers from the US who are vaccinated or have tested negative for Covid-19.

The threat is putting pressure on European countries to accelerate their vaccination campaigns—particularly among young people, the main vector of contagion in countries such as Spain—to avoid having to bring back the sort of restrictions on travel & nightlife that the region labored under until this spring.

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The Boss Wants You Back in the Office. Like, Now.

The Boss Wants You Back in the Office. Like, Now. | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Companies are starting to summon workers back, though many employees have said they prefer more flexible office schedules. “We can’t be a great company working remotely.”
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Many of my clients are reporting the "Great Resignation." Employees seeking a new gig, new work life, continued flexibility. And with the new #delta surge underway, some are still opening after Labor Day (not well thought out).

Apparently however, after 16 months of enduring remote work as a viable pandemic-era solution, many CEOs have a message for their staff: Enough.

Many CEOs say their companies function best when employees can interact in person. Workers have indicated in surveys they want greater flexibility about where and how they work.

How is this going to play out for the business and the worker?

What is happening in your organization? Everybody in office? Hybrid? Remote? People leaving? Do tell!

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You got a coronavirus vaccine. But you still became infected. How did that happen? - The

Infections among some immunized people "are to be expected, even when you have highly effective vaccines," one infectious-disease specialist said.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 The challenge of telling the "breakthrough cases story." The rash of such cases might suggest the coronavirus is regularly blasting by vaccinated people’s immune barriers. But these breakthrough infections are not surprising, nor do they suggest vaccines are failing.

“Breakthrough infections are to be expected, even when you have highly effective vaccines,” said Roy M. Gulick, chief of infectious disease at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York. To understand why is to understand what vaccines are, and are not, capable of.

his is a dynamic pandemic — scientific understanding of vaccines and the virus continues to evolve, as does the pathogen itself. It is uncertain exactly how rare breakthrough infections are. Ongoing clinical trials, following tens of thousands of vaccinated people for two years, will help determine that rate, says Dr Fauci.

 

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Third Covid Wave Upends Fragile South Africa, a Warning for Developing World

Third Covid Wave Upends Fragile South Africa, a Warning for Developing World | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
The pandemic is pummeling the country’s economy, adding to the longstanding frustrations of an impoverished majority. The resulting unrest shows how difficult it will be for many emerging economies to recover from the coronavirus.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 This is such a heartbreaking impact of the #pandemic on many developing countries setting them back for years.  Wave after wave of coronavirus is pummeling #SouthAfrica’s fragile economy & its largely unvaccinated population, creating a spiral of death, lockdowns & anger that has fueled the country’s worst rioting since the collapse of white minority rule in 1994. At least 215 people died in the violence across South Africa’s two most populous provinces & more than 3,400 have been arrested. While the looting had quieted by Monday, the situation remains tense in parts of the country.

 

The human & economic dislocation in South Africa where just 2.8% of people have been fully vaccinated shows how difficult it will be for many emerging economies to recover from the pandemic. The violence in South Africa—as well as in countries including Colombia & Sudan—offers a stark example of how diminishing incomes & the rising cost of food are adding to more than a year of pandemic suffering, exacerbating political instability. The World Bank estimates that more than 160 million people will have been pushed into poverty as a result of Covid by the end of 2021, widening the gap between the world’s richest and poorest nations. The pandemic has led 41 million people to the brink of famine, according to the World Food Program.

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Too Many Zoom Meetings? ‘Core Hours’ Keep Some Remote Workers Productive and Sane

Too Many Zoom Meetings? ‘Core Hours’ Keep Some Remote Workers Productive and Sane | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Slack, Dropbox and other businesses try limiting the time that employees have to be “on” to preserve life-work balance.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 In the new office called “core hours,”  are becoming a thing - set times such as between 10AM & 2PM or 1PM & 4PM—when bosses require employees to be online & available for Zoom meetings, project collaboration & other exchanges. Any other time is a meeting-free zone.

By having certain hours, or days, when everyone is “on,” the idea goes, employees have more freedom and flexibility to do solo work the rest of the time.

The approach—practiced by some employers over the decades as an effort to keep working parents from being boxed out of early morning or late afternoon meetings—was adopted by some bosses during the pandemic as a way to keep remote collaboration from bleeding into all hours of the day. Now, as businesses reopen offices or implement longer-term work-from-home strategies, some companies say they are making core hours standard practice.

San Francisco-based Dropbox, which is allowing workers to continue working remotely if they prefer, has set core collaboration hours for employees in the Americas between 9AM & 1PM PT. Those hours partly overlap with core hours set for Dropbox workers in EU & Asia. Slack Technologies is pushing teams to limit meeting times to about four hours a day, letting groups decide which time windows work best for them.

Smart!

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Coronavirus digest: Australia approves BioNTech-Pfizer for children | News | DW | 23.07.2021

Coronavirus digest: Australia approves BioNTech-Pfizer for children | News | DW | 23.07.2021 | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Australia ramps up its vaccination program by allowing greater numbers to be inoculated. Elsewhere, thousands attend a music festival in the UK. Follow DW for the latest.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Australia's drug regulator has approved the use of BioNTech-Pfizer coronavirus vaccine  for children aged between 12 - 15 years old, said Health Minister Greg Hunt. The Therapeutic Goods Administration had thoroughly studied evidence before approving the vaccine for use. Authorities would soon announce priority groups among those eligible. BioNTech-Pfizer had been approved for those above 16 until now.

Though Australia has handled the pandemic much better than other developed economies, its government has come under increasing criticism for failing to ramp up the vaccination program. Just under 15% of adults have been fully vaccinated. More than 1/2 of its population remain under strict  lockdown measures  due to a rise in cases in the states of New South Wales, Victoria & South Australia.

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Why do new SARS-CoV-2 variants spread more easily?

Why do new SARS-CoV-2 variants spread more easily? | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Random mutations allow new forms of the virus to better bind to human cells | The Economist explains
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 A simple explanation about #variants. Viruses, like all organisms, have life-cycles. Theirs are parasitic, beginning when a parent virus infects another creature & hijacks its cells to make copies of itself.  With #SARSCoV2 this happens when it latches onto an enzyme called ACE2 on the membrane of some human cells & slips its genome through into the cell. This cellular invasion is helped by a protein that studs the surface of the virus, known as the spike. Changes to the spike, driven by genetic changes from mutation, alter the virus’ overall properties, particularly its capacity to spread through populations. 

The mutable nature of viruses is rooted in the randomness inherent within the process of producing copies of any object, making errors unavoidable. As host cells churn out copies errors occur, called mutations. The vast majority of viruses do not survive errors in replication. But some do & may thrive as a result of the changes, outcompeting ancestral viruses & spreading more efficiently through their host population. There are some parts of the structure of the virus that are better able to withstand mutations: the spike protein is the most tolerant to changes. Mutated viruses which survive and thrive are called variants.

 

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Olivia Rodrigo collaborates with Dr. Fauci for a 'Mean Tweets'-inspired vaccine PSA

Olivia Rodrigo collaborates with Dr. Fauci for a 'Mean Tweets'-inspired vaccine PSA | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Olivia Rodrigo, Gen Z poster child, visited the White House to deliver a message to fellow young Americans about COVID-19 vaccines. Let the PSAs flow.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Brilliant outreach to younger Americans/Gen Zers! The president of Gen Z pop met with the Pres. Biden and Dr Fauci, this week at the White House to convince young Americans that getting vaccinated against COVID-19 is good 4 u. While visiting the nation's capital, Rodrigo recorded a series of public service announcements outlining the rewards of protecting oneself and others against the coronavirus — as well as the dangers of going unvaccinated as the Delta variant continues to spread.

 

Shot inside the Oval Office, one video took a traditional approach, with a straightforward joint statement from the president and the chart-topping "Sour" artist on the "importance of getting vaccinated" — directed at "people Olivia's age ... between the ages of 16 and 25."

"We badly need you to get vaccinated — not only for your own sake and your own health, but for all those people around you," Biden says in a clip posted Thursday. "It's the right thing to do."

 

You go Olivia!

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Two-Thirds of Miami Condo Buildings Are Older Than 30 Years. The Repair Bills Are Coming Due.

Two-Thirds of Miami Condo Buildings Are Older Than 30 Years. The Repair Bills Are Coming Due. | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Many towers line the South Florida beachfront, where salt corrosion is speeding their decline. Decision-making is often left to condo boards, which sometimes face multimillion dollar bills.
Regina Phelps's insight:

Engineers say it can take just 30 years for condominium buildings to reach a point when owners can no longer delay making critical repairs. In the Miami region, 2 out of 3 condo buildings are more than 30 years old, according Zillow. In at least seven other Florida cities, some three-quarters of condo buildings have hit that age. Many of the aging towers line the beachfront, where salt corrosion & other forces are speeding their decline. That is leaving thousands of buildings saddled with multimillion-dollar repair costs—& little notion of how to pay for them. Investigators are still trying to determine the cause of last month’s collapse of the 40-year-old Champlain Towers South which left at least 95 dead.

It often takes as little as 20 years for many building materials, including stucco, windows & shingles, to reach the end of what engineers & building inspectors call their “useful life.” Nationwide, more than half of all condo buildings have stood at least three decades, according to Zillow. Coastal cities have among the largest shares of such aging buildings. In Miami, nearly 40% of the housing stock is condos, the highest of any major metropolitan area in the US.

 

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Tapping into the Brain to Help a Paralyzed Man Speak - The New York Times

Tapping into the Brain to Help a Paralyzed Man Speak - The New York Times | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
In a once unimagined accomplishment, electrodes implanted in the man’s brain transmit signals to a computer that displays his words.
Regina Phelps's insight:

This is beyond #amazing! He has not been able to speak since 2003, when he was paralyzed at age 20 by a severe stroke after a terrible car crash. In a scientific milestone, researchers have tapped into the speech areas of his brain — allowing him to produce comprehensible words & sentences simply by trying to say them. When the man, known by his nickname, Pancho, tries to speak, electrodes implanted in his brain transmit signals to a computer that displays them on the screen. His first recognizable sentence, researchers said, was, “My family is outside.”

The achievement, published on Wednesday in the NEJM, could eventually help many patients with conditions that steal their ability to talk. “This is farther than we’ve ever imagined we could go,” said Melanie Fried-Oken, a professor of neurology and pediatrics at Oregon Health & Science University, who was not involved in the project.

Three years ago, when Pancho, now 38, agreed to work with neuroscience researchers, they were unsure if his brain had even retained the mechanisms for speech.“That part of his brain might have been dormant, and we just didn’t know if it would ever really wake up in order for him to speak again,” said Dr. Edward Chang, chairman of neurological surgery at UCSF who led the research.

Mehrban Chawla's curator insight, July 15, 7:23 AM
Amazing human machine interface.
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Rush for COVID vaccines as France may ask for proof of immunization

Rush for COVID vaccines as France may ask for proof of immunization | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Hundreds of thousands of people in France rushed to set up appointments to get vaccinated against the coronavirus after the president warned that the unvaccinated would face restrictions aimed at curbing the quick spread of the Delta variant.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 Can't go to a cafe? Where is that vaccine!!!  What just happened in France? French President Emmanuel Macron said, beginning in August, COVID19 passes would soon be needed for daily activities. To get a pass, a person would have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test or vaccination - Sacré bleu!

 

What happened next? The vaccine appointment app, Doctolib, said 1.7 million French people signed up for shots. Most of them were under age 35.

 

On Tuesday, the country set a one-day record for delivering vaccines. Until now, the country averaged 570,000 shots per day. Within 24 hours after Macron’s announcement, 792,000 people got their first shot. 37% of the French population is now fully vaccinated.

 

Macron angered some when he said that health workers had to get vaccinated by Sept. 15 or face unspecified consequences.

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Bezos and Branson Are Reportedly Flying to Space Without Insurance

Bezos and Branson Are Reportedly Flying to Space Without Insurance | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Virgin Galactic CEO Richard Branson and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos haven't bought insurance for their trips to space, brokers told DealBook.
Regina Phelps's insight:

Does that mean that are super confident about their respective journey's or that the cost would be too high? Jeff Bezos & Richard Branson are flying to space this month without purchasing any liability insurance, brokers told The NYT' DealBook newsletter.

Virgin Galactic founder Branson flew to the edge of space on Sunday (and made it back). That's nine days before Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos also plans to blast off on his company's New Shepard rocket

Insurance brokers told DealBook that Virgin Galactic & Branson haven't seen any evidence to suggest they've bought coverage for the British billionaire in case he gets injured, or worse, dies on the journey.

They said it was likely that the company's VVS Unity spacecraft was insured.

 

Rich men and their toys!

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Covid-19 Delays Hope of Mecca Pilgrimage for Millions of Muslims for Second Year

Covid-19 Delays Hope of Mecca Pilgrimage for Millions of Muslims for Second Year | Crisis Management, Continuity & Pandemic (COVID-19) Planning | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia has sharply limited the numbers allowed to perform the hajj, the once-in-a-lifetime pilgrimage that Muslims save years for.
Regina Phelps's insight:

#covid19 The pandemic disrupts the hajj again this year. The Saudi government won’t allow foreign travelers from outside the country to attend next week’s hajj, which normally draws more than two million pilgrims from across the world.

This year when the five-day hajj begins around July 17, only 60,000 worshipers already in Saudi Arabia will be able to take part in the most important religious pilgrimage for Muslims. It is a once-in-a-lifetime obligation for all those physically and financially able to make the journey.

Last year, Saudi authorities limited the hajj to only 10,000 local residents to maintain social distancing throughout a ritual that ordinarily sees worshipers packed shoulder-to-shoulder. Some hoped the hajj would be fully reopened this year as a result of widespread vaccination campaigns around the world, but Saudi authorities decided to again limit the numbers for the safety of pilgrims.

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