Coastal Restoration
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Ancient dog-size sea scorpion unearthed in China | Live Science

Ancient dog-size sea scorpion unearthed in China | Live Science | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
This is the first time that scientists have found a fossil of this type on the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana.
evelyn leal's insight:
Palaeontologists recently discovered the remains of this scorpion (Terropterus xiushanensis). This 3.3 foot-long sea scorpion prowled the seas of what is now China some 435 million years ago, using its giant, spiny arms to ensnare prey. So cool!!
Eli Lew's comment, October 22, 2021 1:56 PM
Technology has come a along way if they were able to find evidence of a magnificent creature 435 million years ago. I wonder what kind of method they use to discover it. I think this relates to how animals at first lived in the water before evolving and adapting to land conditions.
Coastal Restoration
Coastal management and restoration of our planet's coastlines with a particular focus on California, Louisiana and the Pacific.  Emphasizing wetland restoration, aspects of agriculture in the coastal plain, fisheries, dealing with coastal hazards, and effective governance.
Curated by PIRatE Lab
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East Coast flooding is a reminder that sea level is rising as the climate warms – here's why the ocean is pouring in more often

East Coast flooding is a reminder that sea level is rising as the climate warms – here's why the ocean is pouring in more often | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Climate change is making ocean levels rise in two ways. It’s a problem that will endure even after the world stabilizes and slashes greenhouse gas pollution.
Joong Soo Kim's insight:
Sea level rise is becoming a serious issue. Compared to 1880, the sea level is 8 inches higher, and this is getting worse due to the climate change. Many human acitivities and fossil fuel use cause climate change, and the climate change raises up the global temperature. This phenomenon causes ocean thermal expansion meaning that sea water molecules occupy more space. In addition, higher global temperature melts down glaciers making sea level to rise. If we keep the situation as it is right now, we are going to face huge problems.
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Fishing resumes Tuesday along stretch of Orange County coast near oil spill

Fishing resumes Tuesday along stretch of Orange County coast near oil spill | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Seafood was tested for chemicals from oil from Oct. 14 to Nov. 3 with authorities on Monday alerting the California Department of Fish and Wildlife that the seafood was OK to resume eating.
Michael Boyd's insight:
The orange county oil spill has affected lots of fisheries and fisherman down our coast.  They announced that starting Tuesday November 30th at noon that fisheries could reopen, as their tests indicate that the fish are safe to eat. 
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Scooped by jack weissman
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A rusting oil tanker off Yemen’s coast is at risk of exploding. It could cut off humanitarian aid to millions.

A rusting oil tanker off Yemen’s coast is at risk of exploding. It could cut off humanitarian aid to millions. | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Ben Huynh, a researcher at Stanford University, joined The World's host Marco Werman from his home in California to discuss the potential disaster an oil spill could cause on the Red Sea coasts.
jack weissman's insight:
This article has so many ties to our class. First, the potential 1 million barrel oil spill would be devastating to the local ecosystem. Second, this spill poses an extra threat to the important ports in the area. The massive potential damage here truly makes this a coastal management issue. On top of that, there is massive turmoil within the local government. We all learned how important government is to dealing with the coast. With little help from local government this issue could fall on international organizations.
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Scooped by Evan Helm
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California’s fish population rebounds thanks to strict fishing rules

California’s fish population rebounds thanks to strict fishing rules | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Study says the program is among the world’s most aggressive, helping guarantee good fishing in the future.
Evan Helm's insight:
Bottom-dwelling fish have been on the decline in southern California luckily fishermen have helped the recovery of the population. they have put extreme regulations so they can keep the bottom-dwelling species healthy and thriving.
Brittany Ruffner's comment, November 27, 2021 7:32 PM
This is great news! I am so glad that fish populations have been given the time to replenish themselves. These regulations were very needed so that further exploitation of fish populations doesn't occur.
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Coastal News Today | HI - Hawaii to see more than $2M in federal funds to protect coastal communities

Coastal News Today | HI - Hawaii to see more than $2M in federal funds to protect coastal communities | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The state of Hawaii will receive more than $2 million in federal funding to support coastal resilience projects and protect communities from flooding across the Islands, congressional officials announced Friday.
Eli Lew's insight:
Wanted to share this, because I'm in Maui at the moment. I am currently residing in a condo near the coast. The funds were granted by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation in partnership with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. These funds will go towards deploying ocean sensors to observe and monitor sea levels, tides, currents, waves, and temperatures. U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz stated that, "“These projects will restore or expand wetlands, beaches, and forests and will help keep homes and businesses safe from flooding and coastal erosion." We've heard news stories about tropical storms and sea level rise in Florida and Hawaii is not prone to this. In fact Hawaii is more likely to be affected due to its overall geography. This is great news for Hawaii to prevent long term disaster.
Eli Lew's comment, November 27, 2021 3:43 PM
Meant to say mitigate
Melissa Ruiz's comment, November 27, 2021 6:21 PM
Cool! Before I read yours, I just posted an article on how the same funds were going to communities in Oregon! Great news for Hawaii indeed.
Scooped by Sean Haran
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Commission votes down shrimp plan recommendations | Coastal Review

Commission votes down shrimp plan recommendations | Coastal Review | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The Marine Fisheries Commission voted down last week shrimp management plan recommendations that faced opposition from commercial shrimpers, consumers and officials.
Sean Haran's insight:
This article details the North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission's recent decision regarding restrictions around shrimp trawling in the state's estuarine waters. The Division of Marine Fisheries recommended increasing the amount of the state's estuarine waters closed off to shrimp trawling to 62.1%. This increase in restricted areas has been met with a lo of opposition from those involved in/impacted by the shrimp trawling industry. Shrimp trawling is a significant industry in that part of the country, so this has turned into a really controversial issue where it will be difficult to strike the right balance between economic and environmental sacrifices.
Charles Seamus O'Connor IV's comment, November 26, 2021 12:41 AM
Interesting find! Do you happen to know of something similar occurring in California?
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Old Lyme homeowners digging for answer to flooding problems - News from southeastern Connecticut

Old Lyme homeowners digging for answer to flooding problems - News from southeastern Connecticut | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Residents say the problem became more pronounced after the last 20-foot section of pipe was swept out to sea during a storm in 2018.
Allison Cooley's insight:
Connecticut residents are experiencing underground flooding because of drainage pipes being covered. What I found most interesting about this article was that some residents are experiencing erosion under their homes, so foundations are falling apart. Not only is this seepage bad for the owners, but I figure that this will progress the erosion further. Sediment will become looser. I also found this to be a concern that this has been a problem for a while and has not been fixed yet. Thus, the sewage has nowhere else to flow into other than the beach sand. This could be harmful to the ecosystem and fauna that inhabit this area. I hope that funding comes in soon for this pipe to be fixed soon. 
Eli Lew's comment, November 27, 2021 3:50 PM
This is frustrating as you would think the Connecticut has ample piping technologies. It's probably more complicated than that and unfortunately the positive feedback loop will continue unless correct decisions are made. It's all engineering, chemistry, and physics.
Rescooped by evelyn leal from Soggy Science
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Dungeness Crab at Risk from Multiple Climate-Related Stressors

Dungeness Crab at Risk from Multiple Climate-Related Stressors | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The lucrative Dungeness crab fishery is at risk because of the combined effects of projected climate-related habitat changes: lower oxygen, warming temperature, and increased acidity.

Via Grant W. Graves
evelyn leal's insight:
Climate-related changes to ocean habitats put species at risk. Species targeted by commercial fisheries, such as the Dungeness crab are at higher risk. The interaction of exposure and the degree of negative response to reduced pH, low oxygen and warming temperature on the vulnerability of Dungeness crab eggs, larvae, juvenile and adult life stages are graphed in this article.
Eduardo Garcia's comment, November 26, 2021 1:38 PM
Great visual aid, pointing out the most detrimental environmental effects for the Dungeness crab being ocean acidity. Mostly caused by an increase in CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels. Perhaps there could be bioremediation research with certain CO2 Diffusing Aquatic plants who live alongside Dungeness crab populations.
Scooped by Clara McNamara
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Albatross 'Divorce' Rate Rises as the Ocean Warms

Albatross 'Divorce' Rate Rises as the Ocean Warms | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
Clara McNamara's insight:
Divorce among the black-browed albatross isn't unheard of, but the rate of divorce has increased quite noticeably recently. A female will divorce a male if breeding is unsuccessful by showing up with a new male the next nesting season. After combing through 15 years of nesting data, researchers found that the higher divorce rates are linked to the warming surface temperature of the ocean. As the temperature rises, food becomes scarcer and the birds must fly farther to find food, causing stress on the birds, which lowers the chance of successful breeding.
Joong Soo Kim's comment, November 25, 2021 6:01 PM
This is an interesting article since I didn't know the rising temperature in ocean could affect sea birds. Since black-browed albatross's marriage has a special purpose, it is important for them to be together. However, a problem that
human caused is seperating them. This is sad because if this keeps happening they might get extinct in the future. It's really sad to watch how wild animals get affected by the problems that we caused.
Allison Cooley's comment, November 26, 2021 2:22 PM
This article I find very concerning. Not only has climate change been a major impact on changing ecosystems, but now on the psychological aspects of sea birds. Im glad that this article was posted because when we think of climate change people don't necessarily think about how it might psychologically change a species than rather just killing them off. Frankly, I know that we will likely see similar changes like these within other sea birds, and it's only a matter of time before it happens.
Rescooped by Eduardo Garcia from Sustainable Procurement News
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Seafood sustainability top of mind for shoppers

Seafood sustainability top of mind for shoppers | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
“ An expanding base of environmentally conscious consumers is changing the face of seafood merchandising. With sustainability top of mind for many shoppers, it is becoming increasingly important for retailers to spotlight their suppliers’ eco practices if they are to sustain or grow category activity, analysts note.”
Via EcoVadis
Eduardo Garcia's insight:
This article highlighted the increase in popularity among American and Canadian sea food consumers to seek products with eco safe labels. Such as seafood with the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) label, which according to this article in a study by GlobeScan. Noted that sustainably sourced seafood is the main motivator in sustainable and eco friendly purchasing followed by non GMO and wild caught sea food products.
Ariana Arias's comment, November 23, 2021 7:59 PM
Woah! This is good news for the future of sustainable fisheries! I am happy to see consumers are more conscious about how sustainable their food is. This could lead to a bottom-up movement for fisheries to start or continue practicing sustainable ways of fishing. Now I am interedted to see how our fishing surveys turn out and if consumer consciousness has increased.
Scooped by Jenifer Foote
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Edmontonians march in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en people who oppose Coastal GasLink project - Edmonton | Globalnews.ca

Edmontonians march in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en people who oppose Coastal GasLink project - Edmonton | Globalnews.ca | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
More than 100 people took part in a protest on Edmonton's High Level Bridge on Monday night to show solidarity with Wet’suwet’en people who oppose a natural gas pipeline project.
Jenifer Foote's insight:
After chatting with Ben Oakley at Dew Drop Inn, I have another perspective on pipelines. I am not fond of the Coastal GasLink project and understand why protesters such as the Wet'suwet'en Nation are opposing the continued construction. Demonstrators created a blockade to halt further construction, however, the project is still continuing and will be a 670-kilometer natural gas pipeline from Dawson Creek to Kimat in British Columbia. What are your thought on the project?
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https://wildlife.ca.gov/News/second-disease-outbreak-strikes-hot-creek-trout-hatchery-vaccinations-underway-for-uninfected-fish

Ariana Arias's insight:
We discussed today in class about California's fish and wildlife and fish hatcheries, so I decided to look into any news in that department. This article is interestimg because as we are dealing with meeting people's demands for fish (either for protein or a "luxury"), fish hatcheries are becoming more common. Some of the challenges that come with fish hatcheries are disease outbreaks. It had never before been detected in fish in California until the hatchery outbreaks in 2020 (the outbreak of Lactococcus garvieae, which is similar to streptococcus or strep throat). It will be interesting to see what other challenges fish hatcheries will face in the near future.
Bryan Loya's comment, November 24, 2021 6:56 PM
I wonder if these situations will influences how the fisheries go about farming their fish. I would imagine bigger pens and lower densities will help mitigate that, but I am sure it is more complicated than that. Additionally, I wonder if there will be a public reaction to the fisheries giving the fish vaccinations, especially in this climate, I'm sure it is sore spot for a lot of people.
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NOAA analyses to inform aquaculture siting in the Gulf of Mexico and Southern California | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NOAA analyses to inform aquaculture siting in the Gulf of Mexico and Southern California | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Today, NOAA released two Atlases compiling the best available science to inform the identification of Aquaculture Opportunity Areas (AOAs) in the Gulf of Mexico and Southern California. NOAA previously identified these regions for their potential to host sustainable commercial aquaculture development in the United States. Areas in
Tyler J Campbell's insight:
I thought this was pretty interesting in light of the past week with the bluetech stuff. A couple of atlases were released this past week compiling info that'll aid and influence the selection of different "aquaculture opportunity areas" or AOA's in the Gulf of Mexico and Southern California. The Atlases include information about both sustainable harvest and sustainable business practice to go with it. 
Jenifer Foote's comment, November 23, 2021 5:29 PM
Great scoop it choice! After attending the central coast field trip, I look at aquaculture in a whole new light. I think aquaculture is a way of the future if done correctly and responsibly. Aquaculture can be a sustainable development economically and environmentally. I like how NOAA developed the Atlas by taking into consideration cultural, social, and environmental values within the scoped areas. I definitely want to keep up with this type of news.
Scooped by PIRatE Lab
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New plan calls for closure of Aliso Canyon gas facility by 2023 –

New plan calls for closure of Aliso Canyon gas facility by 2023 – | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Sen. Henry Stern’s plan, which is still in development, focuses on four areas, including developing local clean energy generation and storage, cutting demand for natural gas, improving effici…
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Scooped by Jada Gaines
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Ocean Energy - Sustainable Marine to Deliver Atlantic Canada?s First Instream Tidal Energy in 2022

Ocean Energy - Sustainable Marine to Deliver Atlantic Canada?s First Instream Tidal Energy in 2022 | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
“We are on target to connect the platform to the substation in the first quarter of next year,” said company CEO Jason Hayman while attending the annual Marine Renewables Canada conference in Halifax this week.
Jada Gaines's insight:
This article reminded me of many of the speakers in Blue Tech Week in one of the meetings talking about all of the different ways companies have found to harness the energy of the tides. These are inventors who are looking for many ways to stop using oil and gas and instead change to clean, renewable energy sources. The ocean is a constant source of energy that we could use if we figured out how. This company has found a way to affordably and reasonably do that.
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Scooped by Brittany Ruffner
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Biden announces offshore wind farm to supply power to New York - The

The approval of 12 wind turbines east of Long Island moves the Biden administration closer to its clean energy goals — but it has a long way to go.
Brittany Ruffner's insight:
The current administration just approved the installation of offshore wind turbines that will be used to power New York specifically the eastern end of Long Island. This approval is a step in the right direction towards President Biden's clean energy goals. These turbines will be located off the coast of Rhode Island; a place known to have fierce winds. The administration is hoping to capture the power of the winds to turn into energy. There is major controversy around this decision pertaining to obstruction of views, possible effects on the fishing industry and impacting an endangered whale population.
Jada Gaines's comment, November 27, 2021 11:19 PM
This is a step in the right direction for the government supporting clean energy. While there are setbacks to installing a wind farm offshore, the benefits outweigh the costs. We need to be pushing towards using energy sources that curb climate change.
Michael Boyd's comment, November 30, 2021 6:42 PM
I agree with Jada here, installing cleaner power is what we should be investing in here in America. Coal and oil have become too costly to our planet and way of life and we should invest in phasing them out.
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Ten coastal communities band together to defend against flooding from climate change - Portland

Ten coastal communities band together to defend against flooding from climate change - Portland | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The towns will invest up to a half million dollars to develop a defense system against coastal flooding.
Melissa Ruiz's insight:
NOAA and US Fish and Wildlife have each donated a quarter of a million dollars to these communities from a fund that will donate about 38$ million dollars to 48 states. I think this article is a reminder on how much money plays a role in our defense to climate change. 
evelyn leal's comment, November 28, 2021 2:04 AM
Great article! Glad to see that they will be protecting shorelines using natural materials rather than expensive sea walls.
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California docks see ‘significant progress’ with supply chain backlog, port chief says

The executive director of the Port of Long Beach said Wednesday that the twin ports in California are making “significant progress” in addressing the backlog of cargo ships and containers.
Brennan LaMont's insight:
It is good to hear that the issues off the California coast are starting to be resolved. This is being done through the issuance of large fines to shipping companies that do not move containers from the dock within a set amount of time. While this is not all that needs to be done to fix the issues of shipments entering California's ports, it does appear to be a big help in navigating around this issue.
Suzanne Bergantzel's comment, November 26, 2021 9:19 PM
This is absolutely great news! I saw in another Scoop that the Navy has opened up Port Hueneme to allow cargo ships to unload there as well. Its incredible that it takes this much effort to get these ships unloaded & off of our coast. While I'm not exactly happy that fines will be issued (because that usually leads to even higher prices on goods back to the consumer), it is nice to see that these companies are trying to move forward.
Scooped by Savannah Walbert
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Powderhorn Ranch in Calhoun County soon will become a Texas state park

Powderhorn Ranch in Calhoun County soon will become a Texas state park | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The transaction to donate Powderhorn Ranch conserves one of the state’s largest “unspoiled coastal prairies in Texas.\
Savannah Walbert's insight:
1,360 acres of pristine coastal land in Texas was donated to the state parks system, and will soon begin the process of becoming an official state park. This area faces a lot of pressure to develop, so this is a great step for conservationists in the area!

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Atlantic fishing nations agree to ban catches of mako, world’s fastest sharks | Sharks | The Guardian

Atlantic fishing nations agree to ban catches of mako, world’s fastest sharks | Sharks | The Guardian | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Conservationists hail move as ‘critical breakthrough’ to protect endangered shortfin mako, prized for meat, fins and sportfishing
Bryan Loya's insight:
Several nations have taken the initiative in banning the fishing of shortfin mako shark.The shark is an endangered species that has had growing restrictions, such as the 2019 trade regulation enforced by CITIES. This effort, led by Canada,  the UK, and Senegal, will allow for the shark to reach population level high enough to allow maximum sustainable yield by 2070.
I find it interesting that they believe that the numbers will take that long to rebound. It goes to show that the stocks take a while to respond and recover form a collapse.
Evan Helm's comment, November 27, 2021 7:44 PM
That is interesting that 2070 is the time period they believe there will be enough sustainability for the population. I wonder if they are predicting the number of other population species that might be in the food web for the sharks, I would assume they take into accountability that fish population numbers might fluctuate and cause stress on their numbers creating more time for a population rebound.
Scooped by Careli Velazquez
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Increased frequency of extreme ice melting in Greenland raises global flood risk

Increased frequency of extreme ice melting in Greenland raises global flood risk | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
Global warming has caused extreme ice melting events in Greenland to become more frequent and more intense over the past 40 years according to new research, raising sea levels and flood risk worldwide.
Careli Velazquez's insight:
Over the past decade over 3.5 trillion tons of ice has melted fro the surface of Greenland. That is a great amount of ice and it is mentioned that its enough to cover the entire city of New York with around 4,500 meters.
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Scooped by Suzanne Bergantzel
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Plans for preservation, public access at Ormond Beach take shape

Plans for preservation, public access at Ormond Beach take shape | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The city of Oxnard and several environmentalist groups are planning to restore wildlife habitat at Ormond Beach while in increasing public access.
Suzanne Bergantzel's insight:
Ormond Beach is an incredibly sensitive habitat for the Western Snowy Plover & the California Least Tern, so public access has been very limited over the years. The plan that was drafted by the California State Coastal Conservancy, the nonprofit Nature Conservancy and the city of Oxnard is in the works to make the beach more accessible to the general public while still protecting the critical habitat for these beach nesting birds. “This is a plan that will balance restoration and public access so that sensitive habitats can be restored and at the same time, public access can be improved,” said Sarai Jimenez, of the Nature Conservancy. They are currently still in the planning phases for the project, but they expect to be ready to "break ground" in 2025.
Clara McNamara's comment, November 24, 2021 1:19 PM
Public access has been rough. We really only have two main entrances and only three paths to the beach. However, with limited supplies and money, it is hard to upkeep fences in such a way that keeps people out of a habitat that really needs to be left untouched. Public access is incredibly important, but species on the brink of extinction need to be fiercely protected. Perhaps I am biased, but I have seen the ugly side of Ormond beach. Vandalism, trespassing, theft of fencing and monitoring equipment, nest disturbances and stealing eggs, bike trails through the habitat, off-leash dogs chasing and scaring the birds away who abandon their babies... Ormond's habitat needs serious defense against these types of disturbances, or else we may see a decline in nesting pairs choosing Ormond to raise their young.
Brennan LaMont's comment, November 25, 2021 2:29 PM
If there is a way to increase the protection of habitat and public access, it could be key to increasing public support for conservation. In my experience, many people don't like being closed out of large areas of a beach because "a bird" might be there, so increasing access may counter this. Increasing public access may also decrease people entering areas that are closed off.
Scooped by Charles Seamus O'Connor IV
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Navy Port Allows Commercial Use to Help Supply-Chain Issues

Navy Port Allows Commercial Use to Help Supply-Chain Issues | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
211122-N-AS200-0002 PORT HUENEME, Calif. – The U.S. Navy in partnership with the Oxnard Harbor District (OHD) is providing resources onboard Port Hueneme i
Charles Seamus O'Connor IV's insight:
This story is interesting as it is related to the cargo ships being parked off of the coast for the entire semester so far, and will continue to be an issue for society and the coastal ecosystem around the ships right now. 
Careli Velazquez's comment, November 24, 2021 1:56 PM
This is interesting its also very nice to see that the Navy base is coming together with the Oxnard Harbor District to help and reduce port congestion and reducing the national chain shortage while still having good environmental practices and protecting its wetlands.
Scooped by Kurt Skowronski
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How smart is an octopus? - Queensland Brain Institute - University of Queensland

How smart is an octopus? - Queensland Brain Institute - University of Queensland | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
New research has revealed the unique brainpower of octopuses – known for their intelligence and Houdini-like escapes.
Kurt Skowronski's insight:
Researchers in Australia have found that the octopi of shallow reefs have a greater brain surface area than octopi of deeper regions. This allows the shallow octopi to have intelligence comparable to primates due to their frequent interactions with other animals.
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Scooped by jack weissman
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Kiribati to open one of world’s largest marine protected areas to commercial fishing | Kiribati | The Guardian

Kiribati to open one of world’s largest marine protected areas to commercial fishing | Kiribati | The Guardian | Coastal Restoration | Scoop.it
The Phoenix Islands Protected Area is about the size of California and has been fully closed to commercial fishing since 2015
jack weissman's insight:
I chose this article for a few reasons. First, it displays the complex nature of marine protected areas. The Phoenix Islands protected Area (PIPA) is about the size of California. While conservationists loathe the idea of opening it to fishing, the sovereign nation of Kiribati claims they have lost 70% of their national revenue since the closure. Without proper reimbursement there is no way they can withstand this loss. Lastly, this is the same nation we learned about during Dr. Stones lecture. Hopefully the future mining money will be able to keep this MPA alive.
Allison Cooley's comment, November 19, 2021 5:21 PM
This article is sad but just goes to show why coastal management is so important in addressing all aspects. It would be a travesty to lose this MPA but not only is this nation taking cuts from loss of revenue and advancements, but they also are facing the repercussions of climate change from other nations' outputs. With this topic, I feel conflicted by what I think is better or the right decision because although they might have a chance to get their hands into deep-sea mining that will take likely longer to commercialize.