Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
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Mood and the Net

The relative risk of depression increases in teenagers who pathologically use the internet.

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                       Mood and the Net

      By Loula Koteas- first published in the Athens News

 

The Internet contains a seemingly infinite number of interesting sites. It is often a source of enjoyment and acquisition of knowledge. However, because there is often little or no supervision in this environment, it is sometimes difficult to know when positive activity could become dangerous and cause damage.

 

A lot has been said about children surfing the web and how they can be exposed to sexual, malicious, and violent content. What hasn't been known so far is the link between adolescent depression and the internet.

 

Adolescent depression involves persistent sadness, discouragement, loss of self-worth, and loss of interest in usual activities.

 

A study was recently published in the New York Times linking teenage depression with the internet.

The study was conducted in a high-school in Guangzhou, China, and involved adolescents between the ages of 13 and 18. The research relied on self-rating scales to assess anxiety and depression, along with an addiction test that asked questions like” How often do you feel depressed, moody or nervous when you are offline, which goes away once you are back on line?”

Of the 1,041 respondents, 94 percent were classified as normal internet users and 6 percent as moderately pathological or at severe risk for addiction.

 

The students at the start of the study were all free of anxiety and depression. The study found that, after nine months, no significant relationship between pathological use of the internet and anxiety was observed.

 

However, the relative risk of depression for those teenagers who used the internet pathologically was about two and a half times that of those who did not pathologically use the internet.

 

After nine months, 87 teenagers, or 8.4 percent developed mild to severe depression.

The pathological users went days or weeks without getting enough sleep (which of itself can contribute to depression) and tended to react intensely to the on line game world.

Failing in the world of on line game playing felt as real to these teenagers as failing in other parts of their lives.

 

The lesson to be learned from this study is that adolescents should be limited as to the amount of time they spend using the internet playing games. Young people who are initially free of mental health problems but use the web pathologically could develop depression as a consequence.

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Does Trying to Be Happy Make Us Unhappy?

Does Trying to Be Happy Make Us Unhappy? | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
As we muddle through our days, the quest for happiness looms large. In the U.S., citizens are granted three inalienable rights: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. In the kingdom of Bhutan,
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Focusing our minds on an object other than out own happiness makes us happy.

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Why Success Breeds Success: The Science of “The Winner Effect”

Why Success Breeds Success: The Science of “The Winner Effect” | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Biochemistry and the self-reinforcing upward spiral of winning.

The past century of science has demonstrated the pivotal role of biochemi
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Biologically, there seems to be an intricate exchage of information between body and brain, coalescing into what we call "gut feelings".

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How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different? : NPR

How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different? : NPR | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Scientists used to think that identical twins turned out differently because they were treated differently by friends, teachers or their parents.
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General guidelines for better couples' communication

Good communication and a safe emotional attachment makes for a happy and healthy couplehood.

 

Loula Koteas's insight:

1. Remove the blame from your comments.

2. Be as specific as possible.

3. Say how you feel by using the personal pronoun "I".

4. Don't criticize your partner's personality.

5. Don't insult, mock or use sarcasm.

6. Stick with one situation.

7. Don't try to analyze your partner's personality.

8. Don't mind read.

9. Learn how to deal with each other with emotional responsiveness

(People in a couplehood need to feel that their attachment is safe).

   

 Questions depicting safe attachment:

1. Are you there for me?

2. Do I matter to you.

3. Am I special to you?Do you cherish me?

4. Will I come first?

5. If I need you and call will you come?

 

If you have the sense that the answers to the above question are an unequivocal "yes"- your emotional bond is safe and strong.

 

 

 

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Mothers with Postpartum Depression Would Welcome Online Professional Treatment

Mothers with Postpartum Depression Would Welcome Online Professional Treatment | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Mothers suffering from postpartum depression after a high-risk pregnancy would appreciate anonymous online interventions if available.
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Suicide Rate Rises Sharply in U.S.

Suicide Rate Rises Sharply in U.S. | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
The suicide rate among middle-age Americans rose 30 percent from 1999 to 2010, with more people now dying of suicide than in car accidents.
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What factors do you think are contributing to the increasing suicide rate among middle class Americans?
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The Mediterranean Diet's Brain Benefits

The Mediterranean Diet's Brain Benefits | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
A Mediterranean-style diet, rich in fish, poultry, vegetables and fruit, with minimal dairy foods and meat, may be good for the brain, a large new study suggests.
Loula Koteas's insight:

The lead author, Dr. Georgios Tsivgoulis, an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Athens, said this is the largest study of its kind. The Mediterranean diet, he added "has many benefits--cardiovascular ,cancer risk, anti-inflammatory, central nervous system. We're on the tip of the iceberg, and trying to understand what is below."

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How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments : NPR

How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments : NPR | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Psychologists say that kids who get entangled in their parents' arguments often suffer shame and low self-esteem.
Loula Koteas's insight:

Arguments can be constructive in front of children if through them they learn how to resolve conflict. So it's not that parents argue that is damaging to children - it is how they argue !

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The Problem With How We Treat Bipolar Disorder

The Problem With How We Treat Bipolar Disorder | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
The doctors could address my symptoms. But they didn’t much care about my vanishing sense of self.
Loula Koteas's insight:

The loss of self and the reconstruction of self in bipolar disorder.

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John Cleese on the Origin of Creativity

John Cleese on the Origin of Creativity | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
British actor John Cleese is best known for his comedic talent as one of the founding members of Monty Python, which makes his intellectual insights on the origin of creativity particularly fascinating.
Loula Koteas's insight:

Boundaries of time and space are necessary for creativity to emerge from our unconscious.

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Cognitive Therapy for Obsessions Video with Reid Wilson

Reid Wilson employs a variation of cognitive-behavioral and strategic methods in two live sessions, demonstrating his unique approach to tackling obsessive t...
Loula Koteas's insight:

Paradoxically , you need to bring on the panic in order to defeat it!

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Money and Happiness

Money and Happiness

Loula Koteas's insight:

                                      Money and Happiness

                                           by Loula Koteas

 

  A person's wealth may not always prescribe  how he or she will rank on the happiness scale.

 

 Many of us know  wealthy and  successful people who are living in fabulously wealthy houses, driving luxury cars,  and buying what they desire at a drop of a hat. Yet, they are not happy. Why is that, when we all know that money always makes life easier?  

 

Well, the last round of research shows that money up to a certain point indeed makes people happier because it lets them meet basic needs. However, acquiring things beyond your basic needs is what contributes to  you ranking lower on the long-term happiness scale. 

 

One major finding is that spending money to acquire  experiences produces longer-lasting satisfaction than spending money on objects.

In other words, it's better to go on a vacation than to buy a new dining-room set.

 

Consumption doesn't buy happiness, research has discovered. The only type of consumption positively related to happiness is leisure, such as, vacations, entertainment, sports and equipment for it, like golf clubs and fishing rods. 

 

 Drawing some comparisons with studies linking marriage with happiness, social science researcher, Thomas DeLeine notes:  “ A $20,000 increase in spending on leisure was roughly equivalent to the happiness boost one gets from marriage”. 

 

 Moreover, spending on leisure activities appears to make people feel less lonely because it increases the number of their interactions with people, and studies have shown there is a strong correlation between the quality of people's relationships and their happiness. 

 

Another reason that paying for experience gives us long-lasting happiness is that we can reminisce about it. This most likely will also be true for the numerous tourists at the port of Piraeus this summer  when they were inconvenienced by  striking mariners  from boarding ferries  for  their very much- anticipated island escapades. After sometime passes, it is very likely that this event will be airbrushed by them  with a rosy recollection of their holidays overseas, in spite of the inconveniences.

 

Another reason experiences provide more happiness than the acquisition of things is that experience cannot be absorbed in one gulp it needs gradual processing. On the contrary,  the buzz from a new purchase is pushed towards the emotional norm , which means it doesn't last too long.

 

 For instance, we buy a new house, but soon get accustomed to it and the buzz that we initially got from it gets  pushed toward the emotional norm,  so we stop getting pleasure from it. Consequently,  we want  to get a new buzz and we buy more and more and things, yet happiness evades us.

 

Further, in purchases, anticipation increases happiness. You might want to consider buying something as long as possible before actually buying it. Remember the days before credit cards? Credit cards allowed us to buy  compulsively and  impulsively. When one waits for something and works hard to get it-it makes it feel more valuable. 

 

Nowadays, with the economic climate as it is,  it forces us to buy less and  plan our purchases  more carefully. Paradoxically, this may make us happier. The truism “less is more” fits here perfectly

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Flu in Pregnancy Is Linked to Bipolar Disorder

Flu in Pregnancy Is Linked to Bipolar Disorder | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Flu infection during pregnancy may increase the risk for bipolar disorder in offspring, according to a new report.
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Teen Sexting Linked to Real-World Risky Sexual Behavior | TIME.com

Teen Sexting Linked to Real-World Risky Sexual Behavior | TIME.com | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Teens aren't using digital sexual behavior as a safer alternative to real-world sex, a study finds
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Why the Fuss Over the D.S.M.-5?

Why the Fuss Over the D.S.M.-5? | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
The new handbook of diagnoses won’t matter much to practicing psychiatrists.
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OCD Screening Quiz (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder) - Psych Central

Discover whether you suffer from an obsessive-compulsive disorder with this quick screening online test.
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Women with unintended pregnancy are more likely to suffer from postpartum depression

Women with unintended pregnancy are four times more likely to suffer from postpartum depression at twelve months postpartum, suggests a new study.
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Ask Well: Long-Term Risk of Antidepressants

Ask Well: Long-Term Risk of Antidepressants | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Are there any studies on the long-term — 10-plus years — use of S.S.R.I.’s to treat depression? Dr. Richard A. Friedman responds to reader questions.
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Seniors Getting a Load off Their Minds

Seniors Getting a Load off Their Minds | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Three seniors speak about beginning to see a therapist later in life.
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Big Sibling's Big Influence: Some Behaviors Run In The Family : NPR

Big Sibling's Big Influence: Some Behaviors Run In The Family : NPR | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Psychologists have long known that children often model their behavior on the actions of parents or peers. But science has only recently begun to measure the influence of siblings.
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Older siblings often shape the lives of younger siblings.

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Iwillfly – Taking Off Together – tools for conquering a fear of flying

Iwillfly is an online community for fearful flyers, providing guides, services and information. We know (from firsthand experiences) how tough it is to overcome this and other phobias- and we know how much support and knowledge can help.
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"Creativity is not a Talent It's a Way of Operating"-John Cleese

5 Steps to Creativity

Loula Koteas's insight:

Space (“You can’t become playful, and therefore creative, if you’re under your usual pressures.”)Time (“It’s not enough to create space; you have to create your space for a specific period of time.”)Time (“Giving your mind as long as possible to come up with something original,” and learning to tolerate the discomfort of pondering time and indecision.)Confidence (“Nothing will stop you being creative so effectively as the fear of making a mistake.”)Humor (“The main evolutionary significance of humoris that it gets us from the closed mode to the open mode quicker than anything else.”)

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Psychopaths' Brains Aren't Wired To Show Empathy, Study Finds

Psychopaths' Brains Aren't Wired To Show Empathy, Study Finds | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
Psychopaths are unable to show empathy toward others because their brains aren't wired to do so, according to a new study in JAMA Psychiatry.
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What we know matters, but who we are matters more....

What we know matters, but who we are matters more.... | Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy | Scoop.it
“ What we know matters, but who we are matters more. Being rather than knowing requires showing up and letting ourselves be seen. It requires us to dare greatly, to be vulnerable. […] Vulnerability...
Loula Koteas's insight:

Allow others to see your vulnerability and you will be happier and more fulfilled.

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