Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look
18.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look
This collection has been created to raise awareness about concerns related to the privatization of public education. The page also serves as a research tool to organize online content. The grey funnel shaped icon at the top (in the 'Desktop View' mode) allows for searching by keyword (i.e. entering K12 Inc, KIPP, TFA, Walton, Rocketship, ALEC, Koch, or 'discipline', etc.) will yield specific subsets of articles relevant to each keyword).  For posts related to TFA, see http://bit.ly/TFA_Files. For posts related to Rocketship, see http://bit.ly/Rocketship_Files. For posts related to KIPP, see http://bit.ly/KIPP_Files, and for posts related to the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), see http://bit.ly/ALEC_Files.  Readers are encouraged to explore additional links for further information beyond the text provided on the page. [  [Note: Views presented on this page are re-shared from external websites.  The content may not necessarily represent the views nor official position of the curator nor employer of the curator.] For critical perspectives on the next wave of privatization poised to take over public services, see the page on Social Impact Bonds and 'Pay For Success' programs: http://bit.ly/sibgamble. For additional education updates, see http://EduResearcher.com [Links to external site]
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Asleep at the Wheel: How the Federal Charter Schools Program Recklessly Takes Taxpayers and Students for a Ride // Network for Public Education 

Asleep at the Wheel: How the Federal Charter Schools Program Recklessly Takes Taxpayers and Students for a Ride // Network for Public Education  | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

To view report on ScribD, click title above or here: http://bit.ly/charter_report 

_____________________________

 

To download Executive Summary, visit: 
https://networkforpubliceducation.org/asleepatthewheel/ 

 

To download full report click here: 

https://networkforpubliceducation.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Asleep-at-the-Wheel.pdf 

 

See also the Washington Post writeup about the report here.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Documents related to lawsuits against Rocketship 

Post on withdrawal of 13 of the 20 charters in Santa Clara County:
Settlement document on withdrawal of charters:
 
Bymaster/SJUSD Lawsuit against Rocketship:
Text of initial ruling at Santa Clara County Superior Court
 
6th District Appelate Court Ruling
 
State supreme court denies appeal, and ruling becomes final:
 
 
 
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Former Dean Questions Costs of ‘No Excuses’ Charter Schools on Students of Color // Washington Post

Former Dean Questions Costs of ‘No Excuses’ Charter Schools on Students of Color // Washington Post | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

By Valerie Strauss

“No excuses” charter schools have become a prominent feature of modern school reform. What exactly are they? This is how Joan Goodman, a professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the school’s Teach For America program, defined them in this post:

 

These schools start with the belief that there’s no reason for the large academic gaps that exist between poor minority students and more privileged children. They argue that if we just used better methods, demanded more, had higher expectations, enforced these higher expectations through very rigorous and uniform teaching methods and a very uniform and scripted curriculum geared to being successful on high-stakes tests, we can minimize or even eradicate these large gaps, high rates of drop outs and the academic failures of these children. To reach these objectives, these schools have developed very elaborate behavioral regimes that they insist all children follow, starting in kindergarten. Submission, obedience, and self-control are very large values. They want kids to submit. You can’t really do this kind of instruction if you don’t have very submissive children who are capable of high levels of inhibition and do whatever they’re told.

 

Here is an open letter from Ramon Griffin, the former dean of students at a New Orleans “no excuses” charter school, who urges teachers and staff at such schools to question the model’s social and emotional costs on young people. Griffin was also a charter school teacher and a juvenile probation and detention officer. He is currently working on his doctorate in educational administration at Michigan State University. Contact him at griff519@msu.edu, or visit his website.

 

This appeared on the website of Jennifer Berkshire, freelance journalist and public education advocate who worked for six years editing a newspaper for the American Federation of Teachers in Massachusetts. She gave me permission to run this post. Here is Ramon Griffin’s open letter to teachers and staff of no-excuses charter schools:

 

Dear You:

You were selected to teach at your school because of your intelligence, spunk, tenacity, vigor and, most of all, your passion for public education. You are a risk-taker. You have a can-do attitude with swag to match. You believe that every child has the capacity to achieve academically and are committing your life to ensuring that you affect change in every student you encounter. Your dedication to ensuring that traditionally marginalized students receive a first-class education is commendable. But do you know how much power you hold? Do you truly understand the “no excuses” school culture that you are part of? Do you know the psychological and emotional costs that the “no excuses” model has on students of color? Furthermore, do you care to know?

 

Two years ago, I wrote a blog post entitled “Colonizing the Black Natives: Reflections from a former New Orleans Charter School Dean of Students.” I started the piece by asking if some charters’ practices were new forms of colonial hegemony. It is vital to add that while I was employed at the school, this thought never crossed my mind. My writings were taken by some charter management administrators and staff as an “attack” instead of an opportunity critically engage and refine, deconstruct and reconstruct practices that are doing more harm than good. This time around, I’m hoping to encourage teachers and staff at “no excuses” charter schools to acknowledge what is transpiring in their schools so that we can begin to push back against these practices and transform our schools.

 

I’ll start by offering a few examples of my own. When I chased young black ladies to see if their nails were polished, or if they had added a different color streak to their hair, or when I followed young men to make sure that their hair wasn’t styled naturally, I could have been critically engaging my administrative peers on why these practices were the law at our school—and how exactly they contributed to getting students into and through college.

 

When my school punished young people for not having items school leaders knew their families couldn’t afford, I could have been pushing back against policies that effectively punished students for being poor.

 

When we pulled students out of their classrooms for countless hours for minor infractions even as we drilled them constantly on the importance of instruction time, we could have been taking our own advice.

 

Or when we suspended students from school for numerous days, we could have been providing alternatives that disciplined them but kept them in school.

 

I recently spoke on a panel in Nashville about the psychological and emotional costs that “no excuses” school cultures have on students of color. Afterwards, I was approached by a young white male who told me that he couldn’t understand why parents of color complained about “no excuses” school cultures when they’d chosen to enroll their children in the schools. But the idea that parents should not complain because they purposely enrolled their children in these schools is flawed.

 

Parents, whether they’re in Nashville or New Orleans, desire that their children attend schools that will provide them a rigorous and first-class education. They’re sold a school culture “package” that claims to bring out the best in every student, challenging them to be creative, take risks and think critically. Yet too often, once the package is unwrapped and a culture of compliance is unveiled, students and families feel that they have been sold a dream.

Is it realistic to expect parents to inherently grasp the psychological and emotional costs of the “no excuses” model when many of the teachers and school disciplinarians who enforce these policies don’t have a deep understanding of their effects either? In my experience, staff members are trained to follow the rules regarding discipline and school culture without questioning school leaders about why rules and practices exist in the first place. The idea of critically engaging administrators at these schools seems to intimidate staff, who fear potential backlash for speaking out against culture and disciplinary practices they don’t agree with. They don’t know how to push back critically and meaningfully without being disciplined or even losing their jobs.

 

Whatever the reason, the lack of inquiry by and pushback from highly educated professionals regarding the questionable socialization practices and disciplinary policies of “no excuses” schools is striking. Even more astonishing is that the same things young people of color are punished for in these schools, their teachers were probably raised and encouraged to value. As students themselves, they were probably given the opportunity to be critical, to take risks, to disagree, to not conform, to ask for clarity, to push back, to show emotion and to be relentless about finding their own truth.

 

Many of these educators are no doubt raising their own children to do similar things. But as teachers and staff at
“no excuses” charter schools, they are trained to instill the opposite values in youth of color, even punishing students for being critical or showing emotion. Why? I ask this question, not as a researcher or as a doctoral student, but as a colleague who has navigated the same terrain that you are currently treading. I understand—trust me. I am truly concerned that we are not asking the right questions. Why has “no excuses” been celebrated, packaged and sold to people of color as the prescription for educational and career excellence? Why is it “no excuses” for some and not for all?

 

Ask yourself if you would allow your own children to be treated the way that some of your students are being treated. If the answer is “no,” then there is no excuse for complying with rules and policies you’d never tolerate where your own children or loved ones are concerned. Your students are young people, not robots. They are human children and sometimes their circumstances do warrant exceptions to the rules. Sometimes their excuses are legitimate.

For example, a student who shows up out of uniform because he doesn’t have a washer/dryer at home has a legitimate excuse.

A kid whose family has been transient and is currently homeless has a legitimate excuse to not be in proper uniform. The school should be aware of the situation and at least attempt to provide clothing for the young person.

 

A kid who has three younger siblings he has to care for, clean up, help with homework, protect and teach because they live with their elderly grandmother who was thrust into legal guardianship because his mother was abusive and they never met their father has a legitimate excuse.

 

A kid who has witnessed his mother being shot by his father has a legitimate excuse to not want to walk on a line, talk to anybody or participate in class.

 

A kid who hasn’t eaten a nutritious meal in weeks, but makes it to school every day has a legitimate excuse to feel tired, to not want to participate in an activity or to look at an adult in the eye while shaking their hand. But what happens at most “no excuses” schools is that students get detention or worse because there are no excuses.

 

Is this what John Dewey meant when he described school as “the social center” of the community and as a site for building a democratic society? Are “no excuses” schools preparing citizens, training workers or preparing individuals to compete for social positions? If the answers to these questions aren’t clear, it may be time to seriously re-evaluate the goals of your school.

 

Lastly, I believe that it is time for a thorough examination of the psychological and emotional impact of “no excuses” policies and school cultures. It is time for everyone involved to start asking some critical questions. Stop being fearful. Let your voices be heard.

Ask questions, push back, critically engage, and transform your school and your workplace."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2016/01/26/former-dean-questions-costs-of-no-excuses-charter-schools-on-students-of-color/ 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

ProfitShip (Rocketship) Learning // The Progressive, Public School Shakedown

ProfitShip (Rocketship) Learning // The Progressive, Public School Shakedown | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

"By Ruth Conniff 
"This animated video by Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Mark Fiore looks at school privatization through the eyes of little Timmy, a kindergartener who likes his public school.  Timmy gets a confusing lesson in corporate education reform, starting with the rightwing mantra: “Public schools have failed.” 

“But I like my public school,” Timmy protests.

 

A top rightwing think tank has devoted more than $30 million to spread the message that public education is failing. According to a report by One Wisconsin Now, the Milwaukee-based Bradley Foundation is a major underwriter of this propaganda effort. Bradley spent millions on shoddy research, media punditry, and a lobbying campaign to promote the idea that public schools have failed and to push school vouchers and other privatization schemes as the “solution”.

 

Large, national charter-school chains have been major of the beneficiaries of the campaign to fix “failing” public schools. Among them, Rocketship––“a low-budget operation that relies on young and inexperienced teachers rather than more veteran and expensive faculty,” according to a report by economist Gordon Lafer for the Economic Policy Institute.

 

Not all charter schools are bad. Some offer high-quality, alternative models classrooms that are enriching for kids. But over the last decade, the charter school movement has morphed from a small, community-based effort to foster alternative education into a vehicle for privatizing public education, pushed by free-market foundations, big education-management companies, and profit-seekers looking for a way to cash in on public-education funds."...

 

For full post on The Progressive: 
http://www.progressive.org/news/2014/12/187929/profitship-learning#sthash.dnE8ChWh.dpuf

 

For Mark Fiore's animated video, click here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opcHQ_v6PuU

 

For additional articles related to Rocketship: 
http://www.scoop.it/t/charter-choice-closer-look?q=rocketship&nbsp

and www.stoprocketship.com 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Forced Parent Work Policies // Public Advocates Inc.

Forced Parent Work Policies // Public Advocates Inc. | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

"Public Advocates researched 555 charter schools in California and found that almost one-third of them (30%) require parents to do work at the school for a set quota of hours. This practice is illegal under the California constitution and the Education Code. In our report, we expose the extent of the practice and explain why it is illegal. We have sent a demand letter to the California Department of Education and the State Board of Education urging them to take immediate steps to abolish the practice. At our online appendix, we provide a list of all the charter schools we found that have such a practice, with a link to their policy documents." [Emphasis added]

Read the report Charging for Access: How California Charter Schools Exclude Vulnerable Students by Imposing Illegal Family Work Quotas


Let us know
 if you have experienced charter schools' forced parent work policies"

  • ACE Alum Rock MS
  • ACE Charter Academy MS
  • ACE Charter High
  • ACE Franklin McKinley
  • Discovery Charter School I
  • Discovery Charter School II
  • Rocketship Academy
    Brilliant Minds
  • Rocketship Alma Academy
  • Rocketship Discovery Prep
  • Rocketship Los
    Suenos Academy
  • Rocketship Mateo
    Sheedy Academy
  • Rocketship Mosaic Academy
  • Rocketship Si Se
    Puede Academy
  • Rocketship Spark Academy
  • University Preparatory
    Academy Charter
  • Village School


For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.publicadvocates.org/forced-parent-work-policies 
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Terrain: Teach For America, Charter School Reform, and Corporate Sponsorship // Kretchmar, Sondel, & Ferrare, 2014, Journal of Education Policy

Mapping the Terrain: Teach For America, Charter School Reform, and Corporate Sponsorship // Kretchmar, Sondel, & Ferrare, 2014, Journal of Education Policy | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT from Journal of Education Policy - "In this paper, we illustrate the relationships between Teach For America (TFA) and federal charter school reform to interrogate how policy decisions are shaped by networks of individuals, organizations, and private corporations. We use policy network analysis to create a visual representation of TFA’s key role in developing and connecting personnel, political support, and financial backing for charter reform. Next we examine how the networks unfold at a local level by zooming in on a case study of New Orleans. By mapping out these connections, we hope to provide a foundation for further investigation of how this network affects policies."...

  

For main journal publication page, click on title or image above. For pdf of article, email authors of the manuscript or curator of this collection.  

 

For subset of TFA-related articles in the Charters & Choice: A Closer Look collection, click here: http://www.scoop.it/t/charter-choice-closer-look?q=TFA&nbsp

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Under-Enrollment May Bring $1.4 Million Loss for Rocketship Milwaukee // JSOnline

Under-Enrollment May Bring $1.4 Million Loss for Rocketship Milwaukee // JSOnline | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

"California-based Rocketship Education's first school in Milwaukee fell short of its enrollment projection of 485 students on the third Friday of September, which will likely lead to a $1.4 million shortfall for the school, according to new documents."

Click on title above for full post. 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Ep. 19 AB 221 Capitol Research Forum - Ban Teach For America?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YHY5RSjops&feature=youtu.be 

 

Truth For America is a podcast about Teach For America (TFA) that provides voice to educators, parents, students, and other key stakeholders. Truth For America is co-hosted by Dr. Julian Vasquez Heilig and Dr. T. Jameson Brewer.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Charter School Nightmares 

Charter School Nightmares  | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

"Teacher at a *~bAy aReA cHaRteR~*. While I am lucky to get to work with children every day, there is no limit to how awful these privately-owned, racist and exploitative companies can be. I try to take a break from eternally rolling my eyes at these neoliberal a$$holes to write about how removed from reality a charter school can be."

 

Want to talk to me? Communicate with me on my Twitter account.

 

More about my school. We have:

  • no cafeteria
  • no school nurse
  • no on-site custodian
  • no school library
  • school is 7:45 - 4 PM (8.25+ hours) daily
  • recess is 15 minutes and running is prohibited
  • lunch is 15 minutes and kids are not allowed to talk during lunch
  • every student (from pre-K to 5th grade) has mandatory computer class for 90 minutes a day"

 

https://charterschoolnightmares.tumblr.com/ 

 

Related post documents link where blog is indicated as having been written by teacher at Rocketship 
https://deutsch29.wordpress.com/2017/12/17/bay-area-rocketship-charter-where-vomit-stays-on-the-carpet/ 

 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Scam Goes Education

Scam Goes Education | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

By James Hoover


"What can be more important to save in a viable democracy than education and the assurance that it is easily accessible for all, whatever your skin color or financial means? Unfortunately the best vehicle for that endeavor, public education, has figured prominently in quick-profit schemes of private investors, some stemming from honest attempts to improve education, but many motivated by pure greed.


For the latter, it’s beginning to take the character of the Wall Street frenzy that passed off toxic securities as AAA rated, and sold them full price to unsuspecting buyers. For the most part, Wall Streeters, having a culture of entitlement, gave no apology for their greed.

On the other hand, for-profit education defenders tend to peddle what they call education reform in the guise of superior for-profit charter schools using public money. They tend to obfuscate the “for-profit” motives in the process. While corporate-run schools do provide somewhat comparable student success rates, it’s usually at a higher cost, even though they pay lower salaries to inexperienced teachers, who have a higher turnover. Furthermore, they cherry-pick students, teach to tests, winnow out the most intractable students, and provide little accountability to the community.
 

In states like Arizona, some of the same investors run state prison systems whose lobbyists work overtime to augment prison populations, even supporting harsh imprisonment laws to boost their prison profits and keep penitentiaries full. Public records, for example, show that the so-called “war on drugs” aggressive policing, supported and exploited by corporate interest running privatized prisons, quickly drove up the percentage in state prisons for drug offenses from 6.4% in 1980 to 22% in 1990, with that higher percentage only now declining nationwide.
 

Somehow, the taxpayers seem to pick up the tab for profit-driven enterprises, whether new sports stadiums, privatized prisons, for-profit health care costing double that of other advanced countries, bailed-out banks, and now education.
 

Education Reform Only for the Poor

Wisconsin is another state taken over by Republicans. Scott Walker was elected governor in 2010, intrinsically connected with Koch brother funding and programs. He oversees the usual regimen of cutting spending in education, privatizing so-called low-performing schools and dismantling public unions.
 

Granted a contract by a GOP majority, Rocketship Education has a contract to open schools in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, one of several other large cities. Its model has four principles: 1. Cut costs by eliminating teachers and computerize instruction; 2. Hire inexperienced low-cost teachers; 3. Focus on math and reading; 4. Teach to the test. These are the schools for poor kids.
 

Rich people send their kids to the top ten elementary schools in Milwaukee. These schools look nothing like Rocketship Education schools. They have twice as many licensed teachers per student; offer music, art, libraries, foreign languages and guidance counselors. Students are taught by experienced teachers, not through programmed learning on computers.
 

Rocketship has contracts in several large cities, and like other charters pushes teaching-to-tests in its schools, seeing it as reform. Charter advocates promote themselves as education reformers, civil-rights crusaders, who challenge failed traditional schooling. They blame teachers, teacher unions, bureaucracy, and bloated budgets for claimed failures. They promise to empower parents in low-income minority communities, citing teachers and administrators as the heavies. These promises and claims turned out to be bogus, and the reforms self-serving."...


For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://dissidentvoice.org/2014/10/scam-goes-education/ 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Rocketship Lands in Milwaukee // The Progressive

Rocketship Lands in Milwaukee // The Progressive | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

By Barbara Miner
"Like most principals, Brittany Kinser is a cheerleader for her school. “I just want to make sure you’ll be positive,” she says when I visit the Rocketship charter school in Milwaukee. 
 

Looking younger than her thirty-seven years and with the physique of a long-distance runner, Kinser has a seemingly endless supply of energy and enthusiasm. It’s hard not to like her. Following one of the school’s axioms—Dress for Success—she is wearing a magenta pencil-skirt that nicely sets off her black sweater, tights, and four-inch stiletto heels. Her Dress for Success message is clear: I am competent and I am in charge.


At the same time, Kinser is nervous about my visit. It’s understandable.  For almost a quarter century, I have criticized using public tax dollars to fund private voucher schools and privately run charter schools. Rocketship, an entrepreneurial network of charter schools based in the Silicon Valley, has become a national poster child for the privatization of public education. It is particularly known for its bare-bones curricular focus on standardized test scores in reading and math, its use of computer-based “learning labs” that cut down costs, and its promotion of the Rocketship brand—including a daily pep rally where students chant that they are “Rocketship Rocketeers.”


After visiting Rocketship Southside Community Prep, as Milwaukee’s K4 through fifth-grade school is formally known, I could see why some people might react positively. Students were well behaved. Parents were welcome. The young teachers were energetic.

But as I left the school, I couldn’t help thinking: Can young students dress their way to success? Or chant their way to academic achievement? Are computerized worksheets the answer to reducing the achievement gap?


Rocketship opened its Milwaukee school in 2013, serving overwhelmingly low-income, Latino students on the city’s South side. The local chamber of commerce raised $2.5 million in private contributions to help fund Rocketship’s expansion to eight schools in Milwaukee by 2017.


Just inside the main entrance, there are banners from various universities hanging from the ceiling—part of the school’s message that students should be thinking about college. At the students’ eye level are Dress for Success posters featuring young children wearing the school uniform of khaki pants and a blue polo shirt with the Rocketship logo.

 

I’m not opposed to uniforms. I wore them throughout high school and appreciated that I didn’t have to figure out every morning what to wear. But the nuns never told us that our uniforms were the key to success. The policy was based more on a Catholic school philosophy that worried about the sin of pride and that discouraged too much attention to individual appearances.

 

At Rocketship, I couldn’t quite figure out the laser-like focus on Dress for Success. They don’t take it lightly. The school handbook notes that students who do not wear their uniform “may lose recess, lunch or other privileges.”...

 

For full article published on "The Progressive", click on title or image above or here: http://www.progressive.org/news/2010/12/187931/rocketship-lands-milwaukee#sthash.YGLtwC0G.dpuf

 

For recent news related to the illegal forced parent work policies that are central to Rocketship's parent engagement model (revealed by the Public Advocates report) please visit: http://sco.lt/9FGAkr

 

For other Rocketship related posts: 

http://www.scoop.it/t/charter-choice-closer-look?q=rocketship&nbsp

and www.stoprocketship.com.

 

No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Growing Pains for Rocketship's Blended-Learning Juggernaut - EdWeek

Growing Pains for Rocketship's Blended-Learning Juggernaut - EdWeek | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

Picture caption: "In the center of the room, a software program delivers lessons tailored to the individual skill levels of a second group of Mateo Sheedy students. An hourly-rate aide oversees the students."

by Rahim Rahimian of EdWeek 

 

Article by Benjamin Herold of EdWeek

Selected quote: 

"...Although test scores have steadily declined as the network has added schools and students, Rocketship has maintained its voracious appetite for growth. Rather than resolve that tension, the new flexible classrooms have, by Rocketship’s own admission, further strained the organization and exposed underlying problems glossed over during the group’s ascent.

 

Some Rocketship leaders, for example, now acknowledge that their original blended learning model—which powered the organization’s initial growth, to nine schools and 5,200 students, before its impact could be rigorously studied—may be more effective at teaching students to follow directions than to think for themselves."...

 

For full story, click on title above or here: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/21/19el-rotation.h33.html?tkn=RRYF1gcvzhe8L6wfH%2F0k64DTHTNJY48UkPQP&cmp=clp-edweek

No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Terrain: Teach For America, Charter School Reform, and Corporate Sponsorship // Kretchmar, Sondel, & Ferrare, 2014, Journal of Education Policy

Mapping the Terrain: Teach For America, Charter School Reform, and Corporate Sponsorship // Kretchmar, Sondel, & Ferrare, 2014, Journal of Education Policy | Charter Schools & "Choice": A Closer Look | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT from Journal of Education Policy - "In this paper, we illustrate the relationships between Teach For America (TFA) and federal charter school reform to interrogate how policy decisions are shaped by networks of individuals, organizations, and private corporations. We use policy network analysis to create a visual representation of TFA’s key role in developing and connecting personnel, political support, and financial backing for charter reform. Next we examine how the networks unfold at a local level by zooming in on a case study of New Orleans. By mapping out these connections, we hope to provide a foundation for further investigation of how this network affects policies."...

  

For main journal publication page, click on title or image above. For pdf of article, email authors of the manuscript or curator of this collection.  

 

For subset of TFA-related articles in the Charters & Choice: A Closer Look collection, click here: http://www.scoop.it/t/charter-choice-closer-look?q=TFA&nbsp

No comment yet.