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How A Former Accenture CEO Turned Failing Leadership Into "Growth Through People" Taking Pride Not Just in Their Jobs But the Success of the Whole Business

How A Former Accenture CEO Turned Failing Leadership Into "Growth Through People" Taking Pride Not Just in Their Jobs But the Success of the Whole Business | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
It became apparent to me that to effectively inspire people, in my case more than 100,000, my leadership team and their direct reports needed to understand this.

“WHEN PEOPLE TAKE PRIDE IN THE BUSINESS, THEY FOCUS MORE ON CUSTOMER NEEDS AND DELIVER INNOVATION.”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
The former CEO of Accenture orchestrated a turnaround. And it was based on "the biology of leadership"---a crash course on the neuroscience of human action and relationships. Here are the interrelated steps and components of this CEO's upward spiral: 

1. When you focus on your people, you are communicating that you care. When people know you care, it inspires them to take pride in the business. 

 2.When people take pride in the business, they focus more on customer needs and deliver innovation. 

3.  Innovation helps to differentiate your business and sets you apart from the competition because you are actually delivering the products and services your customers need and want. 

4. When you differentiate your products and services you will win more in the market, and there is nothing like winning to build a team and a business. 

 5.  You are winning, and when you win you grow the business in revenue and profitability.  

6. You are growing, taking market share from your competitors and driving your business to be the market leader. 

7.  Back at the beginning:  You celebrate and reinforce your success by acknowledging, recognizing and rewarding your people. This inspires  more, and an upward spiral develops.
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR, flourishing enterprise, generative economy
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Sustainability

Sustainability | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Every journey begins for a reason. Fifteen years ago, Walmart started on our journey to become a more sustainable company. We set aspirational goals to achieve 100% renewable energy, zero waste and a more sustainable supply chain for people and the planet.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
“USING OUR STRENGTHS TO HELP PEOPLE LIVE BETTER AND PRESERVE THE PLANET” 

 The World’s largest retailer  just announced this month its plan and targets to reach zero emissions by 2040 and aims to protect, manage or restore at least 50 million acres of land and one million square miles of ocean by 2030. 

The CEO Doug McMillon states: "We want to play an important role in transforming the world’s supply chains to be regenerative. We face a growing crisis of climate change and nature loss, and we all need to take action with urgency. For 15 years, we have been partnering to do the work and continually raising our sustainability ambitions across climate action, nature, waste and people. The commitments we’re making today not only aim to decarbonize Walmart’s global operations, they also put us on the path to becoming a regenerative company – one that works to restore, renew and replenish in addition to preserving our planet, and encourages others to do the same."

 How did this happen? Since 2005, Walmart has been collaborating with others to drive positive change through whole system in the room and Appreciative Inquiry strengths based approaches to change across global supply chains. The book FORCE OF NATURE TELLS THE BACKSTORY OF WALMART'S EARLY JOURNEY 

 What happens when a Jib Ellison, Dave Sherman, and Chris Laszlo (strategy thinkers) and change champions such as David Cooperrider (author of Appreciative Inquiry and the strengths based whole-system-in-the room AI Summit methods) team up with the CEO and change leaders of one of the largest—and, and at the time, one of the least Earth-friendly--corporations in the world? 

 "Nothing less than a green business revolution" says author Edward Humes in his book, FORCE OF NATURE: The Unlikely Story of Wal-Mart's Green Revolution. 

The journey transformed into a massive sustainability makeover, which now has snowballed beyond the retailer to influence whole industries, from apparel and magazines, to dairy and to banking, electronics, food supplies, textiles, Now their fresh take on sustainability is empowering a virtual second industrial revolution based on a simple truth: that the clean, green, efficient, less-wasteful, less polluting way of doing business can also be the most profitable way of doing business, while helping customers live better and become part of a positive revolution.  
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B Lab interview | McKinsey

B Lab interview | McKinsey | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
B Lab founder discusses B Corps and the interdependence of business.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
The McKinsey Quarterly: Do you think there is a limit to what the free market can solve? Or, properly channeled, can it solve more than we expect? 

 Andrew Kassoy: Yes to both. The amazing thing, and for me the inspiring thing, about the first 16 years of my career was seeing the capacity of the private sector to create things, and to attract capital and talent in order to scale them. It’s amazing what capitalism can produce that other systems have not been able to. It’s pulled billions of people out of poverty and created innovations that have improved many people’s lives. I think we, at our peril, underestimate how much business can do for social good if the system is structured in the right way. 

 I would also say we shouldn’t be myopic and believe that free enterprise solves all problems, because there are plenty of challenges that the market simply can’t solve. In the United States, we have racial- and social-justice issues that the market’s not going to solve by itself. There are elements of the environmental crisis we face that are not going to be solved solely by business behaving differently. They’re going to require public-policy solutions. The government and the not-for-profit sector are absolutely necessary. They’re just insufficient without us changing the system of business and the capital markets as well. 

The reason we founded B Lab was not so that we could drive every company to be a B Corp, or to build an empire of B Corps. It was to create a model and a credible community of leaders who are using that model so that everyone else can follow and we can change the economic system.
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CEOs Have Realized Companies Need a Purpose Beyond Profit and the Data Shows Purpose and Profit Form a Positive Systems Loop

The Business Roundtable’s letter could mark a turning point.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
This debate — whether purpose and profits work together or are fundamentally at odds with each other — can be informed by empirical research. And the findings of this Harvard Business Review report and ongoing research initiative on corporate purpose support the views of Larry Fink and now of the Business Roundtable: Purpose and profit tend to go together. Using more than 1.5 million employee-level observations across thousands of companies, we quantified purpose as the aggregate sense of meaning and impact felt by employees of a corporation. If the company has a strong corporate purpose, our research shows, its employees will feel greater meaning and impact in their jobs. This view reflects the opening sentence in the BR report: “Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through hard work and creativity and to lead a life of meaning and dignity” (emphasis ours). In our data we find that companies with high levels of purpose outperform the market by 5%–7% per year, on par with companies with best-in-class governance and innovative capabilities. They also grow faster and have higher profitability. However, the link between purpose and profitability is present only if senior management has been successful in diffusing that sense of purpose further down in the organization, especially in middle management, and in providing strategic clarity throughout the organization on how to achieve that purpose.
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The great acceleration: it is time to be designing your company's next big moves to be future-ready

The great acceleration: it is time to be designing your company's next big moves to be future-ready | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The COVID-19 crisis has intensified existing trends, widening the gap between those at the top and bottom of the power curve of economic profit. Will your strategy keep you ahead of the accelerated pace of change?
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Companies with resilient, future-ready business models--such as ESG leaders, technology leaders, and more fully human flourishing enterprises--are increasingly positioned to ride these trends have pulled further away from their industry peers, while those with legacy business models have, for the most part, fallen further behind. This McKinsey report says it's time to identify the big moves--not after the pandemic, but now. Here is why... and click here for how: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0021886320936265

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What is Positive Organizational Psychology?

What is Positive Organizational Psychology? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Lots of resources on understanding and developing organizations as positive institutions. Included are bibliographies, and videos for example Raj Sisodia on fully human organizations and David Cooperrider's Tedx talk about his project at the United Nations where Appreciative Inquiry was used to help build the growth strategy for the UN Global Compact, which is now the largest corporate sustainability network in the world. 

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
What is Positive Organizational Psychology?  Appreciative Inquiry?  Positive Organization Scholarship? Positive Organization Development? Here in this article are lots of solid resources and references for understanding and developing organizations as positive institutions. Included are bibliographies, and videos for example Raj Sisodia on fully human organizations and David Cooperrider's Tedx talk about the Appreciative Inquiry work at the United Nations where the AI Summit method was used to help build the growth strategy for the UN Global Compact, which is now the largest corporate sustainability network in the world.  
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PwC U.S. Chairman Gives Leadership Advice for Coronavirus Crisis 

PwC U.S. Chairman Gives Leadership Advice for Coronavirus Crisis  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
PwC's U.S. head Tim Ryan said that leaders need to be absorbing stress, not creating it.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, what leadership lessons are there for and future managers students in our EMBA and MBA programs? At $19 trillion, the U.S. private sector is four times the size of government and 40 times the size of private philanthropy. What does this imply about partnership, and multi-stakeholder opportunities for win-win? 

PWC Chairman speaks to the question of leadership--how they need to be absorbing stress, and not creating it. Jens Molbak has noticed how the pace of progress on major societal issues can be frustratingly slow, often because of the siloed nature of companies, governments, and nonprofits. In addition, there is a multi-trillion dollar funding gap that neither taxes nor philanthropy can fill on their own. How might the coronavirus moment instil leadership and society lessons for the future? 

Tremendous assets exist un-leveraged in all three sectors that can be unlocked for new value when seen from a new perspective-see https://www.newimpact.care/about

Harnessing the self-interests of all three sectors is essential to drive sustainable solutions to scale. Tri-sector innovators exist across all organizations and sectors, who can create new, or augment existing, business models. Private sector value creation and good for society can be synergistic. There is significant investment capital available to companies that use tri-sector business models to drive higher returns and greater social impact. It is through the combined, collective efforts of people, companies, non-profits, and governments that we can create a better world.
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World’s Largest Organic Dairy Brand Commits to Being Carbon Positive by 2025

World’s Largest Organic Dairy Brand Commits to Being Carbon Positive by 2025 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Horizon Organic, the largest USDA certified organic dairy brand in the world, today announced a commitment to become carbon positive by 2025.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Many companies are announcing great reductions to become carbon neutral in a decade or two but few have the accelerator to the pedal like Horizons Organic. Horizon Organic is the largest USDA certified organic dairy brand in the world and just today it announced a commitment to become not just carbon neutral but carbon positive by 2025. Horizon Organic’s goal is to be the first national dairy brand to become carbon positive not just itself but across its full supply chain. The company plans to achieve carbon neutrality, and then go further to remove, reduce, and offset additional emissions from entering the atmosphere, becoming carbon positive. The Horizon Organic path to carbon positive will start with its new "Growing Years" whole milk half gallons, which will be the brand’s first certified carbon neutral product by the end of 2021. That's next year!  Horizon Organic will continue to advance product certifications in direct partnership with family farms through 2025. The brand has already begun the certification process with The Carbon Trust2 and is working alongside many other friends on the journey, including The Organic Trade Association and Green America’s Center for Sustainability Solutions.
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The Body Shop is adopting "open hiring"helping people start their lives anew. And it's great for the business.

The Body Shop is adopting "open hiring"helping people start their lives anew. And it's great for the business. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Body Shop plans to expand the practice to all of its retail stores this summer, where it employs around 800 people, and as many as 1,000 during the holidays. It’s not a pilot, but a permanent shift in how it handles hiring. “I think for us, it was, if you believe in it, just go ahead and do it,”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
The Body Shop will hire the first person who applies for any retail job: This open hiring movement was started by Greyston Bakery, whose slogan “We don’t hire people to bake brownies, we bake brownies to hire people,” adheres to our tenet, “Be a purpose with a company, not a company with a purpose.” 

The Body Shop studied what was happening at Greystone Bakery and decided open hiring represented a management move that fit their values and that sweet spot of how doing good enriches doing well  .”The results were striking: Monthly turnover in the distribution center dropped by 60%. In 2018, the Body Shop’s distribution center saw turnover rates of 38% in November and 43% in December. In 2019, after they began using open hiring, that decreased to 14% in November and 16% in December. The company only had to work with one temp agency instead of three. Supervisors told Blieden that seasonal staff were approaching them to share their stories. “They said things like, ‘I’ve been struggling to find a job. This is one of the only places that would hire me, and I’m not going to mess this up,'” she says. “When you give people access to something that they’re struggling to find, they’re very committed to working hard and keeping it.”
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ESG programs and the ESG premium | McKinsey

ESG programs and the ESG premium | McKinsey | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

ESG programs and the ESG premium--its large, its growing, and in five years is going to represent a game change in our theory of the business | McKinsey

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
McKinsey has just issued its report of how companies advancing social, ecological and better governance (ESG) issues enrich the value of a company. In its McKinsey Global Survey executives are given a hypothetical opportunity to acquire a new business. The core finding was this: respondents across the spectrum say they would be willing to pay about a 10 percent premium for a company with an overall positive record on ESG issues over a company with an overall negative record. That median value is consistent between CEOs and other C-level executives, as well as among respondents with various office locations and company focuses, sizes, and ownership structures. Some pockets of respondents anticipate "extraordinary value from positive records on ESG."  One-quarter of respondents say they would be willing to pay a premium of 20 to 50 percent for a company leading what we call the solution revolution, and 7 percent say they would pay a premium of more than 50 percent. These are not the old numbers of a slight business value improvement from old and outworn notions of corporate social responsibility. These are signals of where 21st century advantage is going to be--in fact, most executives see these numbers as low, compared to where business will be (and the world it will be in) five years from now. What we are seeing are trends becoming trajectories. 
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Ørsted Launches Programme for a Carbon Neutral Supply Chain

Ørsted Launches Programme for a Carbon Neutral Supply Chain | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Ørsted vision is a world that runs entirely on green energy. The company develops, constructs and operates offshore and onshore wind farms, solar farms, energy storage facilities, and bioenergy plants, and provides energy products to its customers. Ørsted’s sustainability highlights in 2019 include:
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Companies will have to cut emissions faster and further across their operations and supply chains if the world is to limit global warming to 1.5°C by reaching net-zero emissions in 2050. 

Ørsted, one of the world’s largest renewable energy companies and recently named the most sustainable company in the world, has announced that it will be carbon neutral by 2025 and will reach net-zero emissions across the company’s entire carbon footprint by 2040. Orsted was just named, by Corporate Knights, as the number one sustainable enterprise in the world. 

But the real story is this: it used to be like an Exxon or Royal Dutch Shell--a fossil fuel company. Its transformation is a towering model of what many companies need to do if they are to remain viable and future-fit. Imagine if a big tobacco company listened to the science of smoking and cancer. And then more than reducing harm, they completely transformed away from tobacco and became a nutritional excellence company. Well that's akin to what Orsted has done and as a publicly traded company.  London Business School has recognized this feat with an award and they write:

"Ambition has never been in short supply at renewable energy company Ørsted. When rebranding from DONG Energy in 2017, the offshore wind developer unveiled a bold new vision: to create a world that runs entirely on green energy. The foundations for achieving that goal are already in place following a strategic shift that has seen Ørsted named the Judges’ Choice winner for the Masters of Reinvention Award at the 2017 Real Innovation Awards. Ørsted began life in the 1970s as a Danish state-owned energy business that spent the next two decades building coal-fired plants and sea-bound oil and gas rigs around Europe. By 2006, the company was developing offshore wind farms – the first stage of its transformation to a renewable energy operator. At this point, Ørsted’s management decided to focus more on green energy. Coal-fired plants were closed and oil and gas sites sold off, with billions of pounds reinvested in offshore wind farm technology and construction. Today, Ørsted has 24 offshore wind farms in operation and another four under construction, including one in Taiwan. One of its biggest developments is Hornsea Project Two, a UK-based 1,400 MW offshore wind farm that could provide low-carbon electricity to 1.6 million British homes. As part of the rebrand in 2017, Ørsted committed to becoming a coal-free renewable energy company by 2023. Its remaining oil and gas business was bought by petrochemicals producer INEOS last year. “I can’t take any credit as I’ve only been here for 12 months,” jokes Matthew Wright, Managing Director of Ørsted in the UK. “

This is the only example I know of a company transforming from a state-owned, coal-dominated, vertically-integrated, northern European utility company into a global leader in offshore wind and one of the world’s pre-eminent renewable energy businesses. “The management has sold interests that no longer represent Ørsted, such as a profitable oil and gas business. It’s a strategic direction backed up by very sound business results, giving us the confidence and mandate to push on with our aim of becoming completely green.” Delivering returns to shareholders following the company’s listing on Nasdaq Copenhagen in 2016 is also high on the agenda, Wright says. “The leadership’s strategy is to run a profitable and socially responsible business. 

They had to convince people that the future business could be as successful as the old one. Ørsted is now the fastest-growing utility company – and the most profitable, proving you can make decent returns from renewable energy.” Ørsted’s 2017 Q4 operating profit was 13 billion crowns (£1.58 billion), fuelled by winning contracts to develop offshore wind farms in Germany and the UK, existing energy sites and construction becoming more cost effective. When announcing the results, CEO Henrik Poulsen said that Ørsted had established a business to identify new investments in energy storage, solar projects and onshore wind. Making money from green energy The company’s robust share price shows that investors have bought into the rebrand and its focus on green energy, according to Wright. But convincing critics to embrace wind technology was more challenging. “People were sceptical about offshore wind, the costs and whether it was right for governments to subsidise green technology. The big question was, could it ever really amount to anything? “New technology is costly to develop – and we found that we were competing with established ways of generating and providing energy. To force change, you have to deploy new tech and keep developing new iterations so it gets better. Wind farms are now as cost effective as using fossil fuels to generate energy, and far more efficient.” Energy companies in other countries are following suit and investing in offshore wind farms, according to Wright. 


The Orsted story is big news. 

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The 2010s were another lost decade on climate change

The 2010s were another lost decade on climate change | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
To get a sense of how much harder we've made the job of halting warming at 1.5 ˚C by frittering away the last decade, click on the chart and compare the steepness of the slope shown if we had plateaued in 2010 with what is projected should we reach the peak in 2020. 
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
"We’ve lost another decade on climate change. Even as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere race toward levels that could lock in catastrophic warming, the world continued to pump out more. Our collective failure to begin cutting emissions over the last 10 years almost certainly shatters the dream of halting rising temperatures at 1.5 ˚C. Indeed, it’s hard to imagine achieving the pace and scale of change now required even to prevent 2 ˚C."  These are the words in a recent MIT technology review. This article provides the data and the charts for people wishing a quick summary of the science--and why scientists and young people are saying that the age of climate gradualism is over.

 "Among other sharply escalating dangers, that half-degree difference could doom the world’s coral reefs and regularly expose nearly 40% of world’s population to staggering heat waves. There were faint signs of progress. Renewables and electric vehicles finally took off, and nearly 200 countries committed to cutting their emissions under the landmark Paris climate agreement in 2016. (See our related story on the slow progress of clean energy development during the last decade here.) But nations are already falling behind on their pledges, and the US is in the process of pulling out of the deal entirely, at a point when much deeper cuts are required. And for all the momentum behind clean energy technologies, they’ve done very little so far to displace the power plants, cars, factories, and buildings polluting the atmosphere with more emissions each year. The charts that follow reveal how much ground we lost on climate change during the last 10 years. Rising CO2 concentrations The measurement that ultimately matters on climate change is global emissions. And they continued to rise. There was a brief hope that greenhouse-gas pollution had finally plateaued. Carbon dioxide from fossil fuels, which makes up about 90% of total emissions from human activities, was relatively flat from 2013 through 2016. Improving energy efficiency, rising use of renewables, and the shift from coal to natural gas likely drove much of this, particularly in wealthy economies like the US and European Union. 

But emissions have surged in the years since, driven largely by economic growth and increasing energy demands in emerging nations, led by China and India. Fossil-fuel emissions rose an estimated 0.6% to a record 37 billion metric tons in 2019, capping three straight years of growth, the Global Carbon Project reported in early December."
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3 Simple Tips To Building An Untouchable Company Culture 

3 Simple Tips To Building An Untouchable Company Culture  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Although born as an online shoe retailer, Zappos is most famously known for their core values, employee driven company culture and superior customer service.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
The future of work is agile with a focus on self-organization. Research has shown the top-down strategy is no longer effective. If companies want to move quickly, they need to adopt an agile-friendly business model with a C-suite that’s onboard. Since being founded 20 years, Zappos has remained ahead of the curve in everything they do, including self-organization.
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How Brands Have Expanded their Business Purpose in 2019 and are Rapidly Becoming Part of the Solution Revolution

How Brands Have Expanded their Business Purpose in 2019 and are Rapidly Becoming Part of the Solution Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In 2019, brands were expected to take stands on issues central to their business. With this becoming the new normal, how a brand break through the noise? Take a page from Timberland's book. The outdoor lifestyle brand launched its largest-ever global campaign, "Nature Needs Heroes," which aims to plant 50 million trees around the world by 2025 and calls on consumers to join the movement by taking small, simple actions for a healthier planet. Harnessing the brand’s passion for nature and the energy of the fashion world, the campaign celebrates 12 eco-heroes who are making lasting change for the environment and their communities.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Let's call it the "rising 20's"--for that's what leading businesses are doing. More and more businesses have chosen to lead with purpose by aligning with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)--the largest, most urgent world-wide project humankind has ever undertaken.  With only a decade left to meet the serious targets laid out in the SDGs, businesses have to do their work by becoming part of the solution revolution, and share their progress. Procter & Gamble has done just that. In October, P&G announced it had already reached its 2020 goal of purchasing 100% renewable electricity in the U.S. and Canada. This accomplishment signifies a strong start as P&G looks toward its ultimate goal of purchasing 100% renewable electricity globally by 2030. This article explores what all of this means for brands, branding, and becoming "future fit."
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Coalition of CEOs— Leaders on Purpose —Endorses Economic Roadmap for Sustainable Recovery

Coalition of CEOs— Leaders on Purpose —Endorses Economic Roadmap for Sustainable Recovery | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In an open letter, the group of 14 CEOs calls on governments to accelerate such a transition by recognizing and supporting purpose-first business as an emerging fourth sector of the economy.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
In an open letter, the group of 14 CEOs calls on governments to accelerate such a transition by recognizing and supporting purpose-first business as an emerging fourth sector of the economy. A new coalition of global leaders including the CEOs of Danone, Interface, L’Oréal, Mastercard, Natura, Philips and 8 other companies — representing a combined annual revenue of over US$100 billion and a combined global workforce of over 500,000 — today endorsed a post-COVID roadmap to “build the economic system better.” Building on a wave of recent purpose-driven business declarations — including the Business Roundtable’s redefinition of the purpose of a corporation to one in which business promotes “an economy that serves all”; and LEAD on Climate 2020, which saw 300 business leaders calling on the US Congress to address recovery from the climate and COVID crises in tandem — the goal of the new roadmap is to create an inclusive and sustainable economy that benefits society, the planet and shareholders for generations to come. In an open letter, the group of fourteen CEOs — which have formed a for-benefit organization called Leaders on Purpose — called on governments to accelerate such a transition by recognizing and supporting purpose-first business as an emerging fourth sector of the economy. Governments around the world are debating economic and social policies designed to jumpstart the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic; the governments of Canada and the European Union have already put sustainability strategies front and center in their post-COVID recovery plans. Now, Leaders on Purpose’s “Build It Better” framework aims to guide public and private sector leaders toward innovation in public policy, as well as corporate and financial structures, to accelerate the growth of the purpose-first economy. The signatories have also committed to advance the purpose-first economy by leveraging their procurement, innovation, R&D and investment to accelerate the growth of this fourth sector. The letter provides a practical roadmap for proactively redesigning corporate structures and government policies in the development of a more supportive ecosystem for organizations that operate under a new business logic — and urges governments and other companies to join them. “Our world was a dangerous and troubled place even before COVID-19 took hold,” said Paul Polman, former CEO of Unilever, who is now working on transforming the structural impediments to sustainable business. “We have the chance to rebuild a fairer, greener society. But to do so, we need courageous business leaders who are willing to act, individually and as a collective. It’s why I applaud the signatories of this letter. No company alone can solve the problems we face. But together we can begin to challenge the orthodoxies which got us here. Together we can help the world change.” Denton (ICC), and Stefan De Loecker (Beiersdorf).
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These Buildings Generate More Energy Than They Use: New Era of Energy Positive Architecture

These Buildings Generate More Energy Than They Use: New Era of Energy Positive Architecture | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Norway ushers in an era of energy-positive architecture
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Svein Richard Brandtzæg, CEO of the aluminum company Hydro, responded first. From the conference stage, he extended an open invitation to join an unprecedented initiative for energy-positive construction: buildings that generate more energy than they use. A few months later, a “super team” was born. Hydro and the Zero Emission Resource Organisation (ZERO), the nonprofit behind the climate conference, joined the real-estate company Entra, the multinational construction group Skanska, and world-renowned architects Snøhetta to form an alliance—aptly named “Powerhouse.” Its ambitious mission: Create energy-positive buildings that, over a lifespan of 60 years, generate more energy than the total amount consumed for construction, daily operations, material production, and future demolition. Moreover, they proposed doing it in Norway—where long winters mean higher energy demands and reduced solar-cell efficiency. If it could be done there, alliance members surmised, it could be done anywhere. “We wanted to be number one,” Snøhetta senior architect Tine Hegli explains of the driving motivation behind the alliance. “The [first] to make an energy-positive building in the coldest part of Norway. We like to be pioneering. It’s not easy to get inspired by saving energy—not for architects, at least. But to be on a team, a super team, that will be the first . . . is really inspiring.”
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Why I No Longer Believe in the Stakeholder Perspective

Why I No Longer Believe in the Stakeholder Perspective | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The stakeholder perspective is often used in describing corporate social responsibility (CSR), the social license to operate, shared value, and corporate citizenship.  

As I learn more about systems thinking, I see a better alternative to the stakeholder perspective. A systems perspective is not only at the heart of sustainability, but doesn’t force managers to choose favorite stakeholders.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
A stakeholder perspective often forces companies to choose favourites. A systems perspective is better for everyone. So argues Professor Tima Bansal in this call to see the vast potentials of approaching stakeholder theory not in a reductionist way but a whole systems way--with all of its vast potentials for business as an agent of world benefit.
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6.12.20.Yusuf George

6.12.20.Yusuf George | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
On this episode of Solutions News at the World Business Academy we welcome Mr. Yusuf George, the Managing Director of Capital Engagement for JUST Capital, and the author of a recent article in FORBES about Corporate Responsibility for healing the racial divide. We look for some Solutions to the ongoing inequalities that exist between different communities in our nation that’s supposed to be all about equality and justice for all. One area that must play a role in healing these divides that have plagued our nation since the beginning is the private sector, and particularly business – as one of, if not THE most powerful institutions in the USA
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:

The World Business Academy--in this episode of its Solutions News ---welcomes Mr. Yusuf George, the Managing Director of Capital Engagement for JUST Capital, and the author of a recent article in FORBES about Corporate Responsibility for healing the racial divide. Many businesses are being called to act and become real leaders in relation to the ongoing inequalities that exist between different communities in a nation that’s supposed to be all about equality and justice for all. One area that must play a role in healing these divides that have plagued our nation since the beginning is the private sector, and particularly business – as one of, if not THE most powerful institutions in the USA.

The deaths of Black Americans – George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery – coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, have exposed serious and profound fault lines in the country. Factors like a lack of access to affordable healthcare, higher levels of unemployment, lower wages, the racial wealth gap, unequal access to quality education, have created barriers to the well-being of Black Americans. Well before coronavirus and this period of social unrest, Black Americans have historically faced considerable barriers in the labor market, including discrimination in their job searches, occupational segregation, lower wages, increased risks of being fired, and higher levels of unemployment than their White counterparts. 

In this episode Yusuf George of JUST Capital explores the call for stakeholder capitalism and is working to advance the number of corporations, as change champions, that are working to create a more just economy through stakeholder capitalism. If business does better when society does better, then it's imperative for all businesses to take this approach seriously. It is time to commit, innovate, and redress systemic racial inequities, which unfortunately grows more complex with each passing day.
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 Lead from the Future: How to Turn Visionary Thinking Into Breakthrough Growth 

 Lead from the Future: How to Turn Visionary Thinking Into Breakthrough Growth  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Lead from the Future: How to Turn Visionary Thinking Into Breakthrough Growth 

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
In 2019, researchers identified the 20 global companies that had achieved the highest-impact transformations of the decade. A new, and elevated, sense of purpose was the #1 force--helping to build a better world. 

Siemens, for example, had recently embraced an explicit mission to serve society. China’s Tencent had announced a quest to create “tech for social good”; while Denmark’s Ørsted transformed itself from a struggling oil and coal business to a cutting-edge wind energy company, increasing its net profits by some $3 billion per year. Ørsted’s long-term vision of itself as a green company not only inspires its people to perform, it helps its leaders keep its strategy on target. The Ørsted vision is a world that runs entirely on green energy. After selling off its oil and coal assets, Orsted became a model of reinvention. It was named the London School Economics 2017 Winner “Masters of Reinvention Award”   Today Ørsted ranks #1 in Corporate Knights' 2020 index of the Global 100 most sustainable corporations in the world. Now here is the kicker. Researchers have tracked and traced it: 100 companies have been the source of more than 70% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions since 1988, according to a powerful report. The Carbon Majors Report (pdf) “pinpoints how a relatively small set of fossil fuel producers may hold the key to systemic change on carbon emissions,” says Pedro Faria, technical director at environmental non-profit CDP. 

So now the Orsted story is multiplied and magnified in importance. In many ways its transformation, if understood and replicated--or at least used to inspire others innovations in that group of 100--could become worldchanging, with positive implications for business and the entire planet for many generations. 

 Imagine further the Orsted transformation. Here an oil and coal company becomes a force for building a world that runs entirely of green energy. To me it would be like one of the world's largest tobacco companies turning into a nutritional excellence leader. 

Sounds impossible doesn't it? Well not only did Orsted pull of this kind of grand transformation but in three years-- from 2017 to 2020-- its stocks, in Danish Kroners, rose from 200 to 654. This is more than shared value strategy in action. It involves becoming a champion for change--where institutions become what we in appreciative inquiry call "positive institutions" that is, institutions that elevate our highest human strengths, multiply our highest human strengths, and then refract those strengths "outward" in the service of building a better world . 
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The boss who put everyone on 70K

The boss who put everyone on 70K | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A tech boss introduced a $70,000 minimum salary for all his staff - by cutting his own wages. Five years, on he has no regrets.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Dan Price, the CEO of Gravity (a high tech payment company in Seattle), raised all of his employees salaries to at least $70K. A full third of those working at the company would have their salaries doubled immediately. Since then, Gravity has transformed. The headcount has doubled and the value of payments that the company processes has gone from $3.8bn a year to $10.2bn. But there are other metrics that the CEO Price is more proud of. He is proud of the growth and commitment to the concept of family. He said:  "Before the $70,000 minimum wage, we were having between zero and two babies born per year amongst the team," he says. "And since the announcement - and it's been only about four-and-a-half years - we've had more than 40 babies." 

Dan is among a growing number of business leaders very concerned about the hollowing of our middle class and he has studied how well-being seems to go up as people rise in income to something around 70 to 75 k, but then, thereafter, happiness does not go up further based on income. What an interesting, live case or experiment in creating more equality in economic terms.
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Accounting Professor Underscores the Recession Risk of Climate Change and How Energy finance must account for extreme weather risk

Accounting Professor Underscores the Recession Risk of Climate Change and How Energy finance must account for extreme weather risk | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Despite increased awareness among investors, physical climate risk from extreme weather remains surprisingly unaccounted for in financial markets. Without better knowledge of this risk, the average energy investor can only hope that the next extreme event will not trigger a sudden correction to the market values of energy firms.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Financial markets are failing to account for the risks that increasingly frequent and worsening floods, droughts, and other extreme weather events pose to the economy, according to an article published in the journal Nature Energy this week.”If the market doesn’t do a better job of accounting for climate, we could have a recession—the likes of which we’ve never seen before,” said study author Paul Griffin, an accounting professor at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management.Griffin said in the article that his years of research concluded that “unpriced risk” was the “main cause” of the 2007-08 Great Recession and companies are once again failing to assess the damage extreme weather events can wreak on their business. Professor warns: A recession ‘the likes of which we’ve never seen before’ could be on its way 


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Where Sustainable and Shared Value Strategy Creates Better World Impact and Can Deliver Alpha 

Where Sustainable and Shared Value Strategy Creates Better World Impact and Can Deliver Alpha  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Despite countless studies, there has never been conclusive evidence that socially responsible screens deliver alpha. A better model exists, argue Harvard Business School luminaries Michael Porter, George Serafeim, and Mark Kramer.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
In Chris Laszlo's book on "Sustainable Value" he asks us to envision two dimensions to sustainable value creation, a bit similar to Michael Porter and Mark Kramer's  call for "shared value"--see article link. Sustainable value is an outcome of two kinds of value creation or valued destruction. It's a combination of stakeholder value (value creation as positive in the eyes of stakeholders) AND shareholder value or profitable business for owners and investors. Shared-value companies pay attention to both and will be doing things differently than their competitors in ways that connect social impact  and ecological benefit with shareholder value. A Shared-value approach can affect strategy at three mutually reinforcing levels: (1) creating new products that address emerging social needs or open currently unserved customer segments--that is, strategically turning social and global issues into business opportunities that align with and leverage a company's dynamic strengths; (2) enhancing productivity in the value chain, whether by finding new efficiencies or increasing the productivity of employees and suppliers; and (3) investing to improve the business environment or industry cluster in the regions where the company operates. Shared-value strategies such as these go far beyond traditional, siloed ESG thinking by tying social impact directly to competitive advantage and economic performance. This is by far the most powerful way for companies to help address the world’s grave social and global challenges. Why? Well imagine a "do good" and well intentioned company taking on social and global challenges for which it has no skills to address, or is a bit value destroyer for the company. Taken to its logical extreme, it does "good" but goes out of business so it no longer can do good things. This is actually a lose-lose proposition in the long run. So too is a strategy that creates great shareholder value (and often over counting benefits) while shifting great short and long term costs onto society, our health, our future generations (where we undercount costs and harms), By externalizing costs--for example illegally or even legally pouring toxins into our water supplies--costs that someday need to be accounted for, companies risk many things. Think of the $40 billion or more inn fines and litigation that Volkswagen had to swallow. It was an existential moment and for most companies would have been a death sentence.  So again, what might at first look like a win-lose proposition, it today's radically transparent world it is often lose-lose once again: harm for the world an harm for the business. This kind of cost shifting (to society) and benefit borrowing (for the company) is becoming more and more what someone once called "a frenzied game of musical chairs." Where when the music stops, there is a bill to pay. A shareholder only paradigm often drives companies to systematically undercount the costs of external harm and overcount (by borrowing from their  hidden society harm) the benefits to shareholders. The future of business is shared value--with truer market signals and less market failure (like undercounting long term costs, because long term or not, costs are costs, they are debts, and debts need to be repaid.) 
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Be more ambitious with the SDGs — for the world and business | Accenture's Bold Leadership with the Largest Corporate Sustainability Network in the World

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Lise Kingo, former senior executive as Novo Nordisk and now the CEO of the UN Global Compact is pictured with Julie Sweet, the global head of Accenture Strategy, and others. 

Lise Kingo writes:"The Decade of Action marks a shift. The planetary window for "business as usual" is rapidly closing, leaving us with a climate emergency of existential proportions. Coupled with environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and growing social and economic disparities, framework conditions for governments, businesses and citizens alike are becoming increasingly unsafe and unpredictable. Therefore, it is no surprise that media commentaries and activists questioned all of us delegates at the forum in Davos: Are you showing true concern, ready to go back and take the needed action? Or is it just talk? 

 For sure, to date, our collective actions have not been transformational or comprehensive enough to match the scale of the sustainability challenges we face. The time to act is now. It’s time to increase ambition The U.N. Global Compact came armed with one ask for business leaders: To kick-start the Decade of Action by increasing ambition and embed the 10 Principles and the SDGs into business strategy. Through a groundbreaking partnership with SAP, a world-leading digital infrastructure provider, and Accenture Strategy, a world-leading strategy consultancy, U.N. Global Compact launched SDG Ambition together with U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres.

"We expect to work with at least 1,000 companies in 40 markets over the next three years to accelerate the pace of change." This brand-new and transformational global initiative wants nothing less than to change business models so they become future-fit for Agenda 2030. 

A cornerstone is a practical SDG Implementation Framework. It guides businesses in how to anchor SDG ambition as part of their purpose, governance, corporate strategy and goals; how to deepen integration across operations — into products and services, people management and corporate finance. And finally, alongside the integration of ambition, how to authentically enhance stakeholder engagement through reporting and corporate communications, sales and marketing, partnerships and stakeholder relations. 

 This new initiative will be rolled out via the U.N. Global Compact Local Networks at the country level, to challenge and support companies across the world in raising ambition and deepening implementation. We expect to work with at least 1,000 companies in 40 markets over the next three years to accelerate the pace of change. .... Here we will reimagine, reset and redefine ambition, leadership and action to deliver the world we want. Towards 2030, we all need to become activists."
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6 Glimmers of Climate Optimism for the End of a Dark Year

In 2018, we learned from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that we have around 30 years to fully decarbonize or risk widespread global devastation from warming and sea-level rise. We also learned that current emissions patterns are nowhere near in line with that goal.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
How might we decarbonize the economy within a generation? 

The consensus among scientists, researchers, and sustainability experts is that while stopping climate change will require an undoubtedly Herculean effort, the biggest hurdle is political, not technical. The single most important hurdle is our world's capacity for human cooperation and concerted global action at a level never before witnessed in human history. We have all the technology and resources we need. Now, is the time for the human sciences, what Jane Dutton and I wrote about in a book we did  called "The Organization Dimensions of Global Change: No Limits to Human Cooperation. In other words, if all the innovations in sustainable technology and science were harnessed and directed at reducing emissions and environmental collapse, we might stand a chance at meeting the goals laid out in the reports--if we can elevate the human dimensions of change management on a global scale. 
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Time for businesses to put words into actions for a sustainable future

Time for businesses to put words into actions for a sustainable future | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
2019 was a challenging year for business.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft says companies are increasingly going to be seen as part of the problem, or part of the solution revolution.

So he and Microsoft President Brad Smith, Chief Financial Officer Amy Hood  joined Nadella  to announce Microsoft’s plan to be carbon negative by 2030. They write:

 "The scientific consensus is clear. The world confronts an urgent carbon problem. The carbon in our atmosphere has created a blanket of gas that traps heat and is changing the world’s climate. Already, the planet’s temperature has risen by 1 degree centigrade. If we don’t curb emissions, and temperatures continue to climb, science tells us that the results will be catastrophic. As the scientific community has concluded, human activity has released more than 2 trillion metric tons of greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosphere since the start of the First Industrial Revolution in the mid-1700s. Over three-quarters of this is carbon dioxide, with most of this carbon emitted since the mid-1950s. This is more carbon than nature can re-absorb, and every year humanity pumps more than 50 billion metric tons of additional greenhouse gases into the air. This isn’t a problem that lasts a few years or even a decade. Once excess carbon enters the atmosphere it can take thousands of years to dissipate. The world’s climate experts agree that the world must take urgent action to bring down emissions. Ultimately, we must reach “net zero” emissions, meaning that humanity must remove as much carbon as it emits each year. This will take aggressive approaches, new technology that doesn’t exist today, and innovative public policy. It is an ambitious – even audacious – goal, but science tells us that it’s a goal of fundamental importance to every person alive today and for every generation to follow. Microsoft: Carbon negative by 2030 While the world will need to reach net zero, those of us who can afford to move faster and go further should do so. That’s why today we are announcing an ambitious goal and a new plan to reduce and ultimately remove Microsoft’s carbon footprint. By 2030 Microsoft will be carbon negative, and by 2050 Microsoft will remove from the environment all the carbon the company has emitted either directly or by electrical consumption since it was founded in 1975. We recognize that progress requires not just a bold goal but a detailed plan. As described below, we are launching today an aggressive program to cut our carbon emissions by more than half by 2030, both for our direct emissions and for our entire supply and value chain. We will fund this in part by expanding our internal carbon fee, in place since 2012 and increased last year, to start charging not only our direct emissions, but those from our supply and value chains. Chart of Microsoft pathway to carbon negativity." 


 The purpose of the corporation is to serve society--and turn social and global issues into business opportunities.The social purpose of companies which Satya Nadella particularly likes is this: "it's about creating a corporation that finds outsized and profitable solutions to the challenges of people and the planet." "The key word, he continues, is 'profitable,' because we do know that capitalism does have the ability to allocate resources in the most efficient way. But the other key word is 'the challenges of people and the planet.' It's not about creating more challenges to people and the planet but to have real solutions to the problems," he explained.
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Greta Thunberg and mass protests defined the year in climate change and combined with the Global Goals we can unite movement and moonshot. 

Greta Thunberg and mass protests defined the year in climate change and combined with the Global Goals we can unite movement and moonshot.  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Solving climate change is a huge endeavor, and it requires the whole planet,
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian s insight:
When historians look back at 2019, the story of the year will be the inter-generational challenge--the young speaking bluntly, boldly, and powerfully for action on behalf of our world's future-- calling everyone to become part of a solution revolution, to respond to the science of climate crises, and to mobilize the best in the interdependent whole of humanity, with speed not inertia.  
 
In helping us understand the importance of the tsunami of protests that swept across six continents,  Robin Wright in the New Yorker recently stated:

"Popular protests have long been part of the human story in the modern era: the Protestant upheaval (so named for its protests), in the sixteenth century; the French Revolution and the Boston Tea Party, in the eighteenth century; and the uprisings that brought down the Berlin Wall and the Soviet empire, in the twentieth, to name just a few. They have always come in waves. One of the most famous waves was in 1968, a year of social activism that included antiwar demonstrations in the United States, workers’ strikes in France, the Prague Spring’s challenge to communism in Eastern Europe, and student protests in Mexico, Brazil, Spain, Britain, Germany, Italy, Pakistan and Poland. “At a time when nations and cultures were still separate and very different . . . there occurred a spontaneous combustion of rebellious spirits around the world,” Mark Kurlansky writes in “1968: The Year That Rocked the World.” “There has never been a year like 1968, and it is unlikely there will ever be one again,” he predicts. 

 "Until now."

Today's climate movements are likened to seismographs. They are like dials that announce things that are coming on the horizon. Wright continues "The protests of 2019 have been epochal, the fury real, and the underlying message profound for the future." 

Starting in August 2018, Greta Thunberg began this "School Strike For Climate," sign in hand, sitting on the concrete outside the Swedish parliament, demanding action on climate change. She drew worldwide attention. By the end of 2018, students had held strikes in over 270 cities across the world. It was the beginning of a movement that continued to gather momentum through the year. In September, 7 million people took to the streets again for global climate protests, timed to coincide with the United Nations Climate Action Summit. The protests saw Thunberg, and other student activists around the world, pleading with policymakers and governments to combat the climate crisis. 

 Thunberg's movement saw her named Time's Person of the Year in 2019. More importantly, it inspired discussions around climate change to escalate, becoming more urgent and more aggressive. The language too began to change. We stopped talking about climate change and started talking about the "climate emergency," leading the Oxford Dictionary to award the term its word of the year, as usage soared 10,796%.

To an extent unimaginable a decade ago, a macro world-project—with a shared agenda, calling upon all of humankind, and unprecedented in scope and scale--is taking on form and substance. It has both a movement quality--with all the fury, passion, and protest of the climate strikes--and it also has a galvanizing moonshot quality, that is, an innovation and entrepreneurship call to something extraordinary, a positive achievement that's seemingly impossible. The Nobel Laureate Muhammad Yunus is clear, that even in its early and seemingly splintered moment, that the 17 Global Goals might represent the moonshot. He calls the Global Goals a milestone in human history.  The agreement on the SDG's "was the most important set of decisions ever made on the basis of global consensus with quantifiable goals."  

Here is my prediction: 2020 will be the year that both movement and moonshot combine. It will be the year that the rising impulses for change will galvanize into not only a global mind change but into the largest world "all-in" macro-project ever. The age of climate gradualism is over.  And while its true that the speed of the transformation has caught many in business and industry off guard, there is no question--when we look at the success of companies such as Unilever and Patagonia-- we are seeing the the next episode in economic history unfolding. It will involve not a small step, but a giant leap.      

Welcome to the first days of what I am calling our new "decade of determination" a decade that will define our future. 


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