Business as an Agent of World Benefit
30.6K views | +6 today
Follow
Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Greta Thunberg and mass protests defined the year in climate change and combined with the Global Goals we can unite movement and moonshot. 

Greta Thunberg and mass protests defined the year in climate change and combined with the Global Goals we can unite movement and moonshot.  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“Solving climate change is a huge endeavor, and it requires the whole planet,
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
When historians look back at 2019, the story of the year will be the inter-generational challenge--the young speaking bluntly, boldly, and powerfully for action on behalf of our world's future-- calling everyone to become part of a solution revolution, to respond to the science of climate crises, and to mobilize the best in the interdependent whole of humanity, with speed not inertia.  
 
In helping us understand the importance of the tsunami of protests that swept across six continents,  Robin Wright in the New Yorker recently stated:

"Popular protests have long been part of the human story in the modern era: the Protestant upheaval (so named for its protests), in the sixteenth century; the French Revolution and the Boston Tea Party, in the eighteenth century; and the uprisings that brought down the Berlin Wall and the Soviet empire, in the twentieth, to name just a few. They have always come in waves. One of the most famous waves was in 1968, a year of social activism that included antiwar demonstrations in the United States, workers’ strikes in France, the Prague Spring’s challenge to communism in Eastern Europe, and student protests in Mexico, Brazil, Spain, Britain, Germany, Italy, Pakistan and Poland. “At a time when nations and cultures were still separate and very different . . . there occurred a spontaneous combustion of rebellious spirits around the world,” Mark Kurlansky writes in “1968: The Year That Rocked the World.” “There has never been a year like 1968, and it is unlikely there will ever be one again,” he predicts. 

 "Until now."

Today's climate movements are likened to seismographs. They are like dials that announce things that are coming on the horizon. Wright continues "The protests of 2019 have been epochal, the fury real, and the underlying message profound for the future." 

Starting in August 2018, Greta Thunberg began this "School Strike For Climate," sign in hand, sitting on the concrete outside the Swedish parliament, demanding action on climate change. She drew worldwide attention. By the end of 2018, students had held strikes in over 270 cities across the world. It was the beginning of a movement that continued to gather momentum through the year. In September, 7 million people took to the streets again for global climate protests, timed to coincide with the United Nations Climate Action Summit. The protests saw Thunberg, and other student activists around the world, pleading with policymakers and governments to combat the climate crisis. 

 Thunberg's movement saw her named Time's Person of the Year in 2019. More importantly, it inspired discussions around climate change to escalate, becoming more urgent and more aggressive. The language too began to change. We stopped talking about climate change and started talking about the "climate emergency," leading the Oxford Dictionary to award the term its word of the year, as usage soared 10,796%.

To an extent unimaginable a decade ago, a macro world-project—with a shared agenda, calling upon all of humankind, and unprecedented in scope and scale--is taking on form and substance. It has both a movement quality--with all the fury, passion, and protest of the climate strikes--and it also has a galvanizing moonshot quality, that is, an innovation and entrepreneurship call to something extraordinary, a positive achievement that's seemingly impossible. The Nobel Laureate Muhammad Yunus is clear, that even in its early and seemingly splintered moment, that the 17 Global Goals might represent the moonshot. He calls the Global Goals a milestone in human history.  The agreement on the SDG's "was the most important set of decisions ever made on the basis of global consensus with quantifiable goals."  

Here is my prediction: 2020 will be the year that both movement and moonshot combine. It will be the year that the rising impulses for change will galvanize into not only a global mind change but into the largest world "all-in" macro-project ever. The age of climate gradualism is over.  And while its true that the speed of the transformation has caught many in business and industry off guard, there is no question--when we look at the success of companies such as Unilever and Patagonia-- we are seeing the the next episode in economic history unfolding. It will involve not a small step, but a giant leap.      

Welcome to the first days of what I am calling our new "decade of determination" a decade that will define our future. 


No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Elon Musk releases all Tesla patents and Breathes Life and Authenticity into Tesla's Mission 

Elon Musk releases all Tesla patents and Breathes Life and Authenticity into Tesla's Mission  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Elon Musk announced Thursday he had released all of the electric carmaker Tesla's patents, as part of an effort to fight climate change.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
In their book on The Economics of Higher Purpose, Robert Quinn and Anjan V. Thakor state that as companies begin to see the power of high purpose--to drive both human meaning and economic performance-- the higher purpose must meet a crucial test. IT MUST BE AUTHENTIC. If the higher purpose is not authentic everyone sees through it, and it will do more harm than good. Purpose must be a constant message, the driver of hard choices, and serve to unleash positive energy. It requires leaders to be purpose driven people, caring about the collective or larger good, and caring so much that it requires openness, learning, course corrections, honesty, and viewing the whole thing as an infinite journey. Its like gift giving. 

That's why Tesla is a leader. And its model of two dimensions of greatness. The first is innovation that creates traditional business success. The second is stepping forward as a Transformative Change Agent, a force for building a better world--becoming a positive revolution.  And that's what this article is about. It's an inside look at leadership and authenticity in relation to corporate purpose. It's why Tesla has released all its patents and intellectual property.  

Tesla Motors was created to accelerate the advent of sustainable transport," Musk said. "If we clear a path to the creation of compelling electric vehicles, but then lay intellectual property landmines behind us to inhibit others, we are acting in a manner contrary to that goal." In fact Musk said he was now skeptical of patents which too often only served "to stifle progress" and helped enrich giant corporations and lawyers rather than inventors. He said he had earlier felt compelled to file patents for Tesla to prevent big car companies from copying the technology and using the huge marketing and sales apparatus to take over the market. "We couldn't have been more wrong. The unfortunate reality is the opposite," he said, noting that electric or clean-fuel cars "at the major manufacturers are small to non-existent." But with car production continuing at 100 million a year "it is impossible for Tesla to build electric cars fast enough to address the carbon crisis," Musk said. Have other companies making electric cars and the world would benefit from rapid advances in technology. "We believe that applying the open-source philosophy to our patents will strengthen rather than diminish Tesla's position," and ability to attract talented engineers, he said.


Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Patagonia Wins Online Love for Carbon Positive Push

Patagonia Wins Online Love for Carbon Positive Push | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Patagonia is winning online love for its sustainability efforts – most notably, its carbon net-positive push. And other brands would do well to follow suit. Let’s see why that is!

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Patagonia's clear aim is to become carbon positive—taking more carbon out of the atmosphere than they put in, even as the company grows. They are paving the way to regenerative business, and taking seriously the idea that we can create a world where business excels by helping people thrive, and by creating an economy where nature can flourish.  

How?  Below are some key steps they are taking to get there. 

Patagonia shares exciting targets:

"We will use only renewable electricity for our Patagonia retail stores, distribution centers, regional and global offices and headquarters by 2020. As of fall 2018, we are at 100 percent renewable electricity in the U.S. and 76 percent globally. 

--We will use only renewable or recycled materials in our products by 2025. As of fall 2018, 51 percent of our materials by weight are renewable or recycled; by fall 2019 we will be at 69 percent. 

--We will reduce energy use throughout our supply chain, work with suppliers to convert to renewable energy and invest in renewable energy projects to cover the remainder of our carbon footprint. 

--Using the new Regenerative Organic Certification, expand regenerative organic agriculture as the source of fiber for our apparel and our food for Patagonia Provisions to restore topsoil and capture carbon out of the atmosphere. Invest in other carbon-capture projects, like reforestation, across the globe. 

---Grow our Worn Wear® program and make it a robust business unit that supports various initiatives that encourage reuse, repair and recycling to extend the life of products and reduce their environmental footprint.

 ---Double down on grassroots climate action and our support of nonprofits fighting to protect our planet. 

So what's the CONSUMER RESPONSE How are consumers responding? Let’s just say that Patagonia has lots of fans ready to join them as if joining a world movement; see their consistently strong Net Sentiment (a measure ranging from -100 to 100)  (see the rest of this article.) 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Simon Mainwaring Webinar Registration: The Urgency of Now for Brands to Activate Regenerative Purpose

Simon Mainwaring Webinar Registration: The Urgency of Now for Brands to Activate Regenerative Purpose | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Brands are living in challenging times. The climate crisis, technological disruption and new expectations from younger demographics are remaking the business landscape. So how must your company respond? How do you ensure your relevance? How should your brand think and behave to lead in 2020 and beyond?
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Branding with Purpose has to be real, authentic, and future fit. Simon Mainwaring is one of the best in the business and here are his thoughts on the trajectories:  

1. Business will do more to activate purpose -- or risk losing talent & momentum. As the Deloitte 2019 Millennial Survey shows, optimism for the future & trust in institutions among Millennials has reached a low point since 2013. Similarly, as we moved through the decade, fewer Millennials believe business can have a positive impact (55% in 2019 as opposed to 61% last year). Meanwhile over half of Millennials would leave their job in the next two years if they were able. If the situations at companies like Away and We Work are any indication, more companies will have to demonstrate to Millennial customers and workers - who now make up the largest portion of the labor force - that they’re also purposeful in practice, not just intentions. Not only do brands need to define their purpose, they need to create an activation plan to bring it life in a simple, consistent and scalable way -- internally and externally -- across supply chain, products, services, CSR, products and giving. 

 2. Collaboration, systems change & the circular economy will become more important as we move from sustainability to regeneration. In 2020, part of being purposeful in practice is brands admitting that, in order to have true impact, they can’t do it alone. Further, this effort must be focused on changing business at its core. Leaders like the Business Roundtable have alluded to as much by calling for “stakeholder capitalism.” Actionable models like B Corp and the UK’s Principles for a Purposeful Business continue to rise. Companies like 3M, IKEA, Ralph Lauren & Gap have joined REI100 to commit to 100% renewable power. Amazon & JPMorgan are tackling healthcare in impressive ways. Similarly, creating sustainable products alone isn’t enough. 

3. Consumers are looking for a circular economy that not only prevents waste but turns waste into a resource. The Ellen McArthur Foundation and apparel companies are making meaningful progress in redesigning jeans to these ends. So, in addition to meaningfully activating a well-defined purpose, brands will have to identify and align with partners (competition, NGOs, governance frameworks) that enable them to have the greatest credibility and impact. 3. Neutrality won’t work in 2020. 

4. The 2020 US Presidential election and the Tokyo Summer Olympics are poised to bring global issues that have been top-of-mind to a boiling point. For example, one leading candidate, Senator Elizabeth Warren, wants to codify “Accountable Capitalism” into law. Furthermore, an increasing amount of the electorate (10%) will be Gen Z in 2020, for which issues such as gun control and climate change are felt more acutely. 

5.  The research confirms that as these hot button issues become the focus for the next year, brands that sit on the sidelines risk slower growth or even losing customers as they will lose relevance. 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Financially Advantageous Approaches To Sustain The Ecosystem 

Humans are shorter term in their approach to problems and solution spaces. For evolutionary, gradual changes/issues with less than major impacts in the longer term, such a tactical approach is/has been successful. Abetting such a prevalent near term focus are two realisms: first, the amygdala, the part of our brain that keeps us conservative and second the power, financial and political of the current status quo/“winners”. The overall result is a reluctance/resistance to change, risk aversion, and shorter-term fixation.
Although we have extensively studied climate change and ecosystem degeneration driven by human activities for decades, there has been huge inertia-to-denial until rather serious changes/impacts became readily apparent.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
We recommend this article “Financially Advantageous Approaches to Sustain the Ecosystem” by NASA Chief Scientist Dennis Bushnell.  It outlines the best ways forward to accelerate the shift from fossilized industrial sectors to the fully competitive, renewable, highly-efficient circular economies that Hazel Henderson, an economist at Ethical Markets--has tracked in her Green Transition Scoreboard® ....She has, for example, documented green investments--from 2009 to now-- currently totaling a cumulative $10.387 trillion. What's interesting about the current article is the thoughtful way this NASA scientist reflects on the way financial arguments can greatly help accelerate humankind's response to the challenges of climate change. 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

From fossil fuels to green energy and the positive power of the Orsted Story

From fossil fuels to green energy and the positive power of the Orsted Story | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Transforming a Danish state-owned power company into a renewable energy business with wind in its sails
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
ONE HUNDRED

100 companies are responsible for 71% of greenhouse gas emissions. They are all energy and mining companies. 

https://medium.com/swlh/these-100-companies-are-responsible-for-the-climate-crisis-107c5855b2f4

It appears, as the author states, that at first blush focusing on these 100 companies is an easy way to bring about dramatic transformation in the planet's climate trajectory. Indeed, that trajectory is getting more alarming: Global emissions for 2019 are predicted to hit 36.8 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO₂), setting yet another all-time record. This disturbing result means emissions have grown by 62% since international climate negotiations began in 1990 to address the problem. 

So what do we do?

This is unfortunately much harder than it looks. Do what you can, but we need to understand that personal change is not enough. We need collective change.  We have to change our energy supply. We have to change the global economy. And we have to continue to discover good growth and the concept of thick and enduring value (sustainable value) at the same time. 

So here is your management assignment: take a large corporation--lets say a large multi-billion dollar oil, coal, and gas company, and transform it into wealth creating force for global change where its mission is "to create a world that runs entirely on green energy." This is exactly the kind of model of excellence that we need for so many corporations that will be experiencing a world changing truth: the collapse of the fossil fuel civilization is inevitable. Enter a company that won the London School of Businesses Re-invention award. Here is an excerpt from their article: 

AMBITION has never been in short supply at renewable energy company Ørsted. 

When rebranding from DONG Energy in 2017, the offshore wind developer unveiled a bold new vision: to create a world that runs entirely on green energy. The foundations for achieving that goal are already in place following a strategic shift that has seen Ørsted named the Judges’ Choice winner for the Masters of Reinvention Award at the 2017 Real Innovation Awards. 

Ørsted began life in the 1970s as a Danish state-owned energy business that spent the next two decades building coal-fired plants and sea-bound oil and gas rigs around Europe. By 2006, the company was developing offshore wind farms – the first stage of its transformation to a renewable energy operator. At this point, Ørsted’s management decided to focus more on green energy. Coal-fired plants were closed and oil and gas sites sold off, with billions of pounds reinvested in offshore wind farm technology and construction. 

Today, Ørsted has 24 offshore wind farms in operation and another four under construction, including one in Taiwan. One of its biggest developments is Hornsea Project Two, a UK-based 1,400 MW offshore wind farm that could provide low-carbon electricity to 1.6 million British homes. As part of the rebrand in 2017, Ørsted committed to becoming a coal-free renewable energy company by 2023. Its remaining oil and gas business was bought by petrochemicals producer INEOS last year. “I can’t take any credit as I’ve only been here for 12 months,” jokes Matthew Wright, Managing Director of Ørsted in the UK. “This is the only example I know of a company transforming from a state-owned, coal-dominated, vertically-integrated, northern European utility company into a global leader in offshore wind and one of the world’s pre-eminent renewable energy businesses. “The management has sold interests that no longer represent Ørsted, such as a profitable oil and gas business.

 It’s a strategic direction backed up by very sound business results, giving us the confidence and mandate to push on with our aim of becoming completely green.” Delivering returns to shareholders following the company’s listing on Nasdaq Copenhagen in 2016 is also high on the agenda, Wright says. 

“The leadership’s strategy is to run a profitable and socially responsible business. They had to convince people that the future business could be as successful as the old one. Ørsted is now the fastest-growing utility company – and the most profitable, proving you can make decent returns from renewable energy.” Ørsted’s 2017 Q4 operating profit was 13 billion crowns (£1.58 billion), fuelled by winning contracts to develop offshore wind farms in Germany and the UK, existing energy sites and construction becoming more cost effective. 

When announcing the results, CEO Henrik Poulsen said that Ørsted had established a business to identify new investments in energy storage, solar projects and onshore wind. Making money from green energy The company’s robust share price shows that investors have bought into the rebrand and its focus on green energy, according to Wright.

***
This is one of the most important business stories in the world today and we intend to follow it closely--and so should every student of the new theory of business. 


Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

66,000 Employees Have Spoken: They Want To Work For Companies That are Building a Better World

66,000 Employees Have Spoken: They Want To Work For Companies That are Building a Better World | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Companies trying to unlock employee motivation should direct their attention to their community investment strategy. These were the conclusions reached by Volunteer Canada and Great Place to Work Canada in recently released research based on 66,000 Trust Index survey responses from 300 Canadian organizations. This is one of the largest sample sizes of employee perspectives on community investment ever studied.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Leaders in every business want people who are engaged--workplaces where people go beyond their job descriptions and where people think and act like owners of their business. So the first thing organizations should do is look "inside their firm"? 

Wrong, says this study. The first place they should look is outside... and ask--"Is our company contributing to build a better world?" That's what 66,000 employees are saying they want most. It's one of the largest studies of its kind, and the results are telling: 

When people say in a survey that I “feel good about the way my organization contributes to community," they are: 18 percent more likely to stay: “I want to work here for a long time.” 45 percent more likely to be brand ambassadors: “I’m proud to tell people I work here.” 83 percent more likely to put in more effort: “People are willing to give extra to get the job done.” 57 percent more likely to feel valued: “I feel I make a difference here.” The research also looked at companies in the top versus bottom quartile on community investment, defined based on average employee responses to the survey statement, “I feel good about the way my organization contributes to community." Top quartile companies enjoy the following associated business benefits: 13 percent voluntary turnover in top quartile companies (versus 23 percent in bottom quartile). 80 qualified applicants per position in top quartile companies (versus 61 in bottom quartile) 19 percent revenue growth in top quartile companies (versus 16 percent in bottom quartile) 72 percent introduced new methods in the past year (versus 54 percent in the bottom quartile). 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

COP25: Global investors urge countries to meet climate action goals

COP25: Global investors urge countries to meet climate action goals | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
More than 630 investors who collectively manage over $37 trillion in assets are calling on governments across the world to step up action to address climate change and achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. 
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
More than 600 institutional investors managing $37 trillion in assets call for governments to step up their efforts against climate change.
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

The world is doing much better than the bad news makes us think 

The world is doing much better than the bad news makes us think  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
by 2035 there will be almost no poor countries in the world. And it’s not just income. In health, education, security and freedom, the world is improving, according to my Harvard colleague Steven Pinker in his best-selling 2018 book “Enlightenment Now.”

Fresh, comprehensive evidence of progress comes in the new Legatum Prosperity Index, based on data from 167 countries — with 99.4 percent of the world’s population — on 300 social and economic indicators of well-being. (I am a board member of the Legatum Institute, a London-based think tank focused on global poverty, but I was not involved in preparing the index.) Across those dimensions, from 2009 to 2019, 148 of the 167 countries have seen net progress — much of it dramatic, and especially so among the poorest countries in the world.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
This article, citing Steven Pinker's studies, helps us see good news in the midst of bad, and helps us see why "bad is stronger than good" in terms of one of humankind's great and perhaps crippling cognitive biases. The article states: 

“Major portions of the world are in conflict and some, in fact, are going to hell,” President Trump said two years ago in a speech before the United Nations. Most things the president says are controversial, but the only disagreement most Americans across the political spectrum might have had with this statement was his use of “some.” 

As a rule, we tend to believe — mistakenly — that the world is getting worse. There is a natural human bias toward bad news. The title of a 1998 article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology sums it up: “Negative Information Weighs More Heavily on the Brain.” Negative stimuli get our attention much more than positive stimuli — which makes evolutionary sense for survival. Nice things are enjoyable; bad things can be deadly, so focus on them. 

And given that, in the news media, attention equals money, we can see the commercial reason for a lack of headlines such as “Millions not going to bed hungry tonight.” Frequently, however, the bad-news bias gives us a highly inaccurate picture of the world. For example, according to a 2013 survey, 67 percent of Americans think global poverty is on the rise, and 68 percent believe it is impossible to solve extreme poverty in the foreseeable future. 

Meanwhile, starvation-level poverty has decreased by 80 percent since 1970, according to economists at Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology."

How did this great accomplishment come about? And what can we learn from this kind of success that will help us--for example- make climate action as source of innovation and solution-focused business--a reality?   
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Measures of the "Management Top 250" Rankings Affirm the Concept of Shared Value: Value that's valued in the eyes of stakeholders and shareholders.

Read our latest post from head of the KH Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute Rick Wartzman and senior director of research Kelly Tang.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Do good to do well. This is the most simple way to speak to the idea of business as an agent of world benefit. Notice, first, it is not "do well and then do good." This order reflects an older view of corporation as philanthropist. Once you make a profit, then you can help society with philanthropy. But now the hypothesis that is increasing in need of being tested is this: if companies do good in eyes of society and stakeholders, will they do better too with shareholders. In other words is real value--long term, thick and durable value--a combination of profit and purpose, doing good in the eyes of stakeholders and the expectations of shareholders?  

After the Business Roundtable announced last August that the CEOs of many of America’s largest companies were making a “fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders”—and would no longer stand behind the notion that shareholders’ interests should be placed ahead of everyone else’s—the reaction from many quarters was swift: That sounds great. But how are we going to be able to tell if any of this is real? “ So asks Rick Wartzman, the former head of the Drucker Institute who has created a measure of the concept of shared value creation--the kind of value thats good long term for the business and good long term for society and all the stakeholders of good business. 


One of the first tasks Rick and his colleagues took on was to distill Drucker’s 39 books and some 1,500 articles into something you could wrap your arms around. Eventually, the team homed in on 15 central principles spread across the five categories. The next task was to find the right data sources that would serve, in effect, as empirical proxies for the underlying principles. 

The research team wound up settling on 37 sets of data from third-party sources. Finally, it was time for the biggest step of all: creating the statistical model itself. This assignment fell to  Lawrence Crosby, a data scientist with a great deal of industry experience.  The hypothesis—based on Peter Drucker’s writings—was that each of the five key areas should be highly correlated, rising and falling together to a statistically significant degree. Although this might seem obvious to those who have a “stakeholder” mindset, few, if any, studies had approached the matter in a scientific way. 

 Would social responsibility really correlate with innovation? Would financial strength show a statistical relationship with, say, employee engagement and development? We really didn’t know. By 2016, Crosby had assembled five years of data on a few hundred companies. It was now time to test the hypothesis. And, powerfully, the correlations between each of the five dimensions and the measure of total effectiveness ranged from 0.51 to 0.83--and these are exceptional figures in the realm of management science. 

 For the first time, Peter Drucker’s worldview—that all of these different areas of corporate management are deeply interrelated—had been supported statistically. 

 Today, those rankings are the foundation of the Wall Street Journal’s Management Top 250 list of the “best-run U.S. companies,” And First Trust Portfolios now has an investment product based on the index’s methodology. 

 “The measurement used determines what one pays attention to,” Peter Drucker advised 65 years ago. “It makes things visible and tangible. The things included in the measurement become relevant; the things omitted are out of sight and out of mind.” 

 Rick Wartzman's conclusion: "If business leaders are sincere about meeting the needs of all stakeholders, they need to take into account the stakeholder metrics—whether the Drucker Institute company rankings or another broad-gauge measure—just as they do earnings and share price." 
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

PBS Radio: Created in Cleveland, Appreciative Inquiry Has Transformed the World of Management | WKSU

PBS Radio: Created in Cleveland, Appreciative Inquiry Has Transformed the World of Management | WKSU | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cleveland’s greatest export may not be world-class healthcare, auto parts, or even LeBron James, it might be a management philosophy. Appreciative Inquiry
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
It was great to be interviewed by a local PBS news station WKSU and humbling to be part of what's being called "Cleveland Rising"...The PBS journalist  spoke with Fowler Center colleague Ron Fry and myself and carefully looked into what we've been cultivating for nearly 40 years--the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry. The journalist writes:  "Cleveland’s greatest export may not be world-class healthcare, auto parts, or even LeBron James, it might be a management philosophy. Appreciative Inquiry was invented at Case Western Reserve University three decades ago and has become a transformative tool for companies and organizations around the world." 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian from Amazement and Achievement: Leading By Seeing What Works
Scoop.it!

A business reformation: a time for lighting the flame 

A business reformation: a time for lighting the flame  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A business reformation: lighting the flame
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The business philosopher Charles Handy, a little more than a year ago, called for a business reformation--a revolution really. He used to think that the answer to building more fully human organizations--businesses that also nurture life and nature--might be a charter for humanity to be used as a guide to organization. 

But what we really need he argued is a transformational business reformation. We need to rethink how organizations, particularly businesses, are actually run, why they are run, and what their purpose and role are in society. We need to figure out how to keep human values intact inside the corporation and how business enriches, nourishes, and replenishes society and ecosystems . And if that seems ambitious, consider, says Handy, the achievement of Martin Luther – one person on his own. And not just Luther. In 1970 Milton Friedman took it on himself to announce that the only purpose of a business was to make a profit. 

That’s how, argues Handy, we arrived at shareholder value (a phrase previously unknown), followed by agency theory, the idea of a corporation as a nexus of contracts, and stock options, eventually legalized by Congress. And now, a swamp of buyback shares, trillions of dollars going into the private equities of some of the senior managers. This too was a revolution – an unwelcome one, but a revolution nonetheless.. So where do we find another leader? One who will lead our reformation? Well, says Handy: "Let me follow another Martin Luther and share a dream. Couldn’t the modern Wittenberg be the Peter Drucker Global Forum? And the Luther of our time be Peter Drucker? 

With his words from the grave magnified … by all of us. And exemplified by putting our words into practice. If people criticize, we have to be bold, like Luther, and say: here I stand, I can do no other, because this is the right way to behave. So don’t ask for leaders. It’s up to us to start small fires in the darkness, until they spread and the whole world is alight with a better vision of what we could do with our businesses. If not us, then who? if not now, then when?"
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's curator insight, November 27, 2019 3:37 PM
The great business philosopher Charles Handy, a little more than a year ago, called for a business reformation--a revolution really. He used to think that the answer to building more fully human organizations--businesses that also nurture life and nature--might be a charter for humanity to be used as a guide to organization. But what we really need he argued is a transformational business reformation. 

We need to rethink how organizations, particularly businesses, are actually run, why they are run, and what their purpose and role are in society. We need to figure out how to keep human values intact inside the corporation and how business enriches, nourishes, and replenishes society and ecosystems . And if that seems ambitious, consider the achievement of Martin Luther – one person on his own. And not just Luther. In 1970 Milton Friedman took it on himself to announce that the only purpose of a business was to make a profit. That’s how, argues Handy,  we arrived at shareholder value (a phrase previously unknown), followed by agency theory, the idea of a corporation as a nexus of contracts, and stock options, eventually legalized by Congress. And now, a swamp of buyback shares, trillions of dollars going into the private equities of some of the senior managers. This too was a revolution – an unwelcome one, but a revolution nonetheless.. So where do we find another leader? One who will lead our reformation? 

Well, says Handy:

"Let me follow another Martin Luther and share a dream. Couldn’t the modern Wittenberg be the Peter Drucker Global Forum? And the Luther of our time be Peter Drucker? With his words from the grave magnified … by all of us. And exemplified by putting our words into practice. If people criticize, we have to be bold, like Luther, and say: here I stand, I can do no other, because this is the right way to behave. So don’t ask for leaders. It’s up to us to start small fires in the darkness, until they spread and the whole world is alight with a better vision of what we could do with our businesses. If not us, then who? if not now, then when?"
Mercy Dantas's curator insight, November 29, 2019 5:38 PM

https://www.livestockanimalexchange.com/en/product/alpine-goats-for-sale/

Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Three Executive-Branding Lessons We Can Learn From Elon Musk: The Corporation as a Cause 

Three Executive-Branding Lessons We Can Learn From Elon Musk: The Corporation as a Cause  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Love him or hate him, here are three branding lessons every executive can learn from Elon Musk.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Like him or not, the polarizing founder of Tesla has successfully demonstrated what we call "the corporation as a cause" and an agent of change--in this case industry and world change. Purpose driven companies are magnets: they are magnets for investors; they are able to rally employees; they are able to grab new business opportunities and even react to crises more efficiently. If you want to look at how tomorrow's companies organize, strategize, and compete just look at companies that summon extraordinary contribution from their people and win the hearts and minds of whole communities of stakeholders ready to join a mass movement. One of Elon Musk's leadership qualities is that he knows that big brands are magnets too for critics--and instead of running away he runs toward them. This article shares one moment where Musk made a widely publicized apology and the headlines range loud saying "this was the most valuable apology ever made." But what's most defining about Musk's leadership is that he knows the corporation of the future is not a dispassionate engine of commerce. For him the corporation as a cause fires people's imaginations and allows him to define success on a very big scale. Musk justifies nearly every  business decision by referencing his "mission of accelerating the advent of sustainable transport and energy, which is important for all life on Earth." Even if it's in the form of a memo discussing employee cuts sent in the middle of the night, Musk is always reiterating that his primary focus is the relentless pursuit of developing technology that best serves humanity. Let's call it purpose with an attitude. Others call it strategy as advocacy. Today it's not enough to be different--a company needs to be different by making a difference, championing betterment, transformation, and breaking the mold. Love him or hate him" says this article "there are three branding lessons every executive can learn from Elon Musk." 
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

How Brands Have Expanded their Business Purpose in 2019 and are Rapidly Becoming Part of the Solution Revolution

How Brands Have Expanded their Business Purpose in 2019 and are Rapidly Becoming Part of the Solution Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In 2019, brands were expected to take stands on issues central to their business. With this becoming the new normal, how a brand break through the noise? Take a page from Timberland's book. The outdoor lifestyle brand launched its largest-ever global campaign, "Nature Needs Heroes," which aims to plant 50 million trees around the world by 2025 and calls on consumers to join the movement by taking small, simple actions for a healthier planet. Harnessing the brand’s passion for nature and the energy of the fashion world, the campaign celebrates 12 eco-heroes who are making lasting change for the environment and their communities.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Let's call it the "rising 20's"--for that's what leading businesses are doing. More and more businesses have chosen to lead with purpose by aligning with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)--the largest, most urgent world-wide project humankind has ever undertaken.  With only a decade left to meet the serious targets laid out in the SDGs, businesses have to do their work by becoming part of the solution revolution, and share their progress. Procter & Gamble has done just that. In October, P&G announced it had already reached its 2020 goal of purchasing 100% renewable electricity in the U.S. and Canada. This accomplishment signifies a strong start as P&G looks toward its ultimate goal of purchasing 100% renewable electricity globally by 2030. This article explores what all of this means for brands, branding, and becoming "future fit."
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

How Disruptive Technologies Can Reunite America

How Disruptive Technologies Can Reunite America | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Tesla’s stock price hit a record high of $400 per share on the day President Donald Trump was impeached and climbed to $420 on the Monday after. However uncorrelated these events are, they encapsulate the American divide. Is going back to coal going to make us economically better--and make consumers feel better, be better, and feel part of a movement they will be proud to share with their grandchildren? 

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Cost less, mean more is the formula for economic success.  Profit more from less-economic harm is the result. 

Taken together we are seeing the future of 21st century business advantage. It's about economic wellness--business as an agent of not only world benefit but personal, community, and ecosystems benefit--while also helping every consumer experience themselves as being an agent and partner, a change champion, for world benefit.

This economic formula is the driving force behind the mass-market emergence of significantly disruptive product solutions like competitively priced, meatless hamburgers that are increasingly healthy, tasty and lower in environmental impacts—or electric cars and forthcoming cyber trucks that are faster, cheaper to operate and maintain, come with zero emissions, and can be powered by sunlight. To elaborate on this "cost-less + mean more" formula we have to realize that the future is about more than products; way more. It's about meanings--dematerialized but powerful personalized meaning. It's about significance. It's about providing consumer experiences that not only delights but betters their lives and invites them onto a pathway to better the lives of others and our world. As we move from goods to betterment ( "goods to betters" for short) we can foresee how it will be the company of the future that provides an easy on-ramp for people to be part of some positive revolution; that's where today's vanguards are taking us. Corporations such as Beyond Meat, with soaring post IPO stock prices, are inviting fans and investors ("social movement partners") into an on-ramp or pathway to be a force for good. The sale and rapid growth of plant-based meat technology in our fast-food restaurants is not a weak but a strong signal toward a food revolution that can perhaps help solve our national obesity epidemic while also reducing the environmental footprint of the agriculture sector. 



 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

100% Wind, Water, & Solar Energy Can & Should Be The Goal, Costs Less

100% Wind, Water, & Solar Energy Can & Should Be The Goal, Costs Less | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
But let’s say you’re a skeptic. Okay, cut those estimates in half. You still wind up with more than $400 trillion in savings over a decade on an investment of $76 trillion — more than a 500% return on your investment. What person wouldn’t jump at that deal?
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
This short article in CleanTechnica summarizes the financials of of recent research project led by Mark Jacobson at Stanford University. Mark is an amazing researcher and shows how pragmatically and Non-Utopian it is to move to a world of 100% clean, renewable and massive job creating energy. The numbers are astonishing--and all the technologies we need are mostly here already.  And so are the positive pathway plans for 139 countries.

The Stanford team figures about $73 trillion will be needed to get it done worldwide. But that’s hardly the end of the financial discussion. They say the world can get to 80% renewable energy by 2030 and complete the transition by 2050. And doing so will pay hefty dividends — money that can be used to offset the cost. Global energy needs would be reduced by 57% because of (energy) loss advantages in the transition. That in turn would reduce the amount of money the world spends on energy each year from $17.7 trillion to $6.6 trillion, a savings of $12.1 trillion a year. But it’s also the social and health cost savings that are truly staggering — you know, things like death and disease caused by pollution from burning fossil fuels. The team pegs those costs globally at $76 trillion a year now but demonstrates how those will be reduced to $6.8 trillion annually by transitioning to 100% clean energy. Add those two together and you get $80 trillion a year in benefits. 

Now, multiply that by the 10 years between now and 2030 and the transition to clean energy could save the world $800 trillion in avoidable costs. And, of course, all the energy generated by renewables won’t be given away. It will be sold at market prices, bringing in trillions more dollars.

But let’s say you’re a skeptic. Okay, cut those estimates in half. You still wind up with more than $400 trillion in savings over a decade on an investment of $76 trillion — more than a 500% return on your investment. What person wouldn’t jump at that deal? Oh, you can’t put an accurate price on social costs, you say?  Ready for more? Jacobson and company acknowledge there will be job losses as the result of the transition to 100% zero-emission energy, but their research suggests the transition will lead to the net positive creation of 26.8 million more well paying jobs than the jobs that are lost. In other words, renewable energy will replace those existing jobs and add 26.8 million more worldwide.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Corporate Longevity Update: Creative Destruction Rides High

Corporate Longevity Update: Creative Destruction Rides High | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Our longer-term forecast expects the longevity rate to plunge during the next decade—dropping down to a 12-year average lifespan by 2027."  Much needed is a new theory of the business because when society changes its mind, business must shift--and not delay.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Recent studies show that the typical firm in the S&P 500 can expect the gale of creative destruction to accelerate; by 2027 the average lifespan of a corporation will be about 12 years old. Obviously there is no biological basis for this, like a human body with its evolutionary biological makeup. 

The largest reason for the corporate malaise: The assumptions on which the organization has been built  no longer fit reality. They are what Peter Drucker called a company’s "theory of the business." 

Every organization, whether a business or not, has a theory of the business, argued Drucker, and when the theory no longer fits reality all shallower change attempts will fail, even if successfully deployed. Think of all of the piecemeal patches--the perennial back and forth pendulum swing between decentralization and centralization; reengineering the corporation; outsourcing; sprints and agile designs; etc. Given the superior scope and power of the emerging theory of the business, we might expect it to prevail, rather quickly. But that never happens, because like a gestalt switch, is often has to happen all at once--exactly what happens, said  Thomas Kuhn, in great scientific revolutions. 

 A theory of the business has three pillars. First, there are assumptions about the environment of the organization: society and its structure, the market, the customer, and technology. Second, there are assumptions about the specific mission of the organization. The assumptions about mission and purpose define what an organization considers to be meaningful results; in other words, they point to how it envisions itself making a difference in the economy and in the society and our world at large. Finally, the assumptions about core competencies define where an organization must excel in order to maintain leadership. 

The theory of the business must fit--and keep up with or shape reality itself--and it must be embedded throughout the business, always tested and renewed, and abandoned if necessary. Patchwork rarely works. And the biggest shock is when society changes its mind. 

And thats whats happening today. We are witnessing the birth of not just a global mind change of historic proportions but a World Project unprecedented in scope, scale, and acceleration. Whether it's symbolized by the 17 global goals, or literally every company going green in some way, or the birth of what's now being called the 5th Industrial Revolution--the macroshift is calling not just for a new theory of THE business, but all of business. An irreversible revolution in expectations is under way. Millions of citizens, consumers, and caring people are challenging the shortsighted and self-limiting, and in many cases destructive, assumptions of the industrial age. 

There is a new theory of business emerging for building the sort of 21st century company that are agents of world benefit.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Menu For Year’s End Dinner: Hope

Menu For Year’s End Dinner: Hope | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Menu For Year’s End Dinner: Hope
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
What's for dinner on New Year's Eve? How about images and stories of hope--all grounded in reality? 
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

30 visions for a better world in 2030

30 visions for a better world in 2030 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
We asked members of our Global Future Councils - academics, business leaders and members of civil society - to imagine a better world in 2030. Only by thinking about where we want to be tomorrow can we prompt the action we need today.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Only by thinking about where we want to be tomorrow can we prompt the action we need today. What's your vision of a better world through the lens of better business? How might you improve this one--this vision of the future as shared by the past two Global Forums for Business as an Agent of World Benefit:

"It’s a bright-green restorative economy that purifies the air we breathe; it has eliminated the concept of waste and toxic byproduct; extreme poverty has been eradicated worldwide; it is powered through clean renewable energy innovations; it offers large increases in prosperity for everyone in the world; it is supported through market signals that generate positive incentives aligned with the long-term social good (it has virtually eliminated “perverse incentives”); the economy’s industry-leading stars are celebrated as solution finders and creators of sustainable value; the corporate citizenship movement has united sustainable design and business strategy into a positive race to the top; it is a globally inclusive system that respects and replenishes the health of people, diverse communities and the wealth of nature; and it is all built on an economy of institutions that are widely trusted as positive institutions—workplaces that elevate, magnify, and refract our highest human strengths into the world. While it’s been called many things—the “purpose economy” or “conscious capitalism” or “the sustainability frontier”—there is one thing that is emerging as the new normal: it’s the idea that business, as a noble profession, is perhaps the most positive force for building a better future."
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

ESG Leaders Create New Sources of Value According to McKinsey Research

ESG Leaders Create New Sources of Value According to McKinsey Research | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Your business, like every business, is deeply intertwined with environmental, social, and governance (ESG) concerns. It makes sense, therefore, that a strong ESG proposition can create value—and in this article, we provide a framework for understanding the five key ways it can do so.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Global sustainable investment now tops $30 trillion—up 68 percent since 2014 and tenfold since 2004. And the business case keep mounting. 

The acceleration has been driven by heightened social, governmental, and consumer attention on the broader impact of corporations, as well as by the investors and executives who realize that a strong ESG proposition can safeguard a company’s long-term success. 

The magnitude of investment flow suggests that ESG is much more than a fad or a feel-good exercise. So does the level of business performance. The overwhelming weight of accumulated research finds that companies that pay attention to environmental, social, and governance concerns do not experience a drag on value creation—in fact, quite the opposite (see the article's Exhibit 1). 

A strong ESG proposition correlates with higher equity returns, from both a tilt and momentum perspective. Better performance in ESG also corresponds with a reduction in downside risk, as evidenced, among other ways, by lower loan and credit default swap spreads and higher credit ratings.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Corporate exploitation isn’t just bad, it has no place in our future

Corporate exploitation isn’t just bad, it has no place in our future | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A business can be anything its founders, board, or employees want. But in 2020 the only thing it can’t be is exploitative: there will be no more excuses for overlooking exploitation. We all know how rife exploitation is, particularly in long complicated supply chains in the food or fashion industries. We know what modern slavery is. We know which activities result in biodiversity loss. And we know emissions contribute to climate change.

Acting in a regenerative way shouldn’t even require legislation or wrist slapping. It will require only a moderate amount of creativity.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
In 2020, regenerative businesses – with regenerative environmental and social goals embedded in their DNA – will start to take center stage both in terms of profit and long-term reputation. By 2030 the “new theory of business” will become the new normal. 

The trends, all of them are turning into a trajectory, are pointing what it takes to lead, to win the hearts and minds of stakeholders, and to attract everything from investment to superstar employee talent. The fact is global sustainable investment in environmental and social impact business, now tops $30 trillion—up 68 percent since 2014 and tenfold since 2004. 

 So is it a surprise that in January 2019, Larry Fink, CEO of one of the world’s largest investment banks, BlackRock, declared that clients must “contribute to society, or risk losing our support." Is it surprise that a few months later the Business Roundtable modified a 20-year-old mission statement on the purpose of business, moving away from outdated thinking that businesses only exist to maximize shareholder wealth and asserting that they must also exist to benefit their employees, supply chain, and the communities and societies where they operate. The 180 CEOs that signed the Business Roundtable's new purpose statement—including from Amazon and PepsiCo—realize they no longer have a choice. The 1,000s of employees of Amazon are demanding the company commit to zero emissions decades before Amazon's strategy calls for. And everywhere we see consumers are starting to demand B-Corp or Social Enterprise Certification and national laws in most G20 countries will start to reflect the obligations of businesses to end exploitation and extraction in favor of regeneration – meaning restoring nature, drawing down carbon, rebuilding communities and delivering multiple net-positive objectives. 

The fact is this: when society changes its mind business has to keep up, if not lead. And all of this dynamism in favor of business as an agent of world benefit is never going to slow down again. For in the big picture the macro shift is almost beyond human comprehension: we live in a geologic period of time where the impact of human activities is so remarkable that scientists have pointed out that we are living in the new geological age of the Anthropocene (the Greek word for “the recent age of man”)…
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

 Time to Advance From the "Separate Stakeholder" Perspective to "Systems Stakeholder" View of the Firm

 Time to Advance From the "Separate Stakeholder" Perspective to "Systems Stakeholder" View of the Firm | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

All organizational stakeholders, not just shareholders, should matter to the organization. The key stakeholders are customers, suppliers, and the community, but there may be numerous others who have a stake in the company’s actions.

The stakeholder perspective is often used in describing corporate social responsibility (CSR), the social license to operate, shared value, and corporate citizenship.  

As I learn more about systems thinking, I see a better alternative to the stakeholder perspective. A systems perspective is not only at the heart of sustainability, but doesn’t force managers to choose favorite stakeholders.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Tima Bansal, one of the academy's leading sustainability researchers, is calling for all of us to advance the stakeholder view of the firm. A systems perspective asks companies to consider the broader system in decision making, not just stakeholder groups in a reductionist or separationist way. It asks executives to shift their gaze from the parts (the stakeholders) to the whole (society). When executives see society in its entirety, new options for innovation and win-win-win combinations come into view. Executives either see new win-wins or they see the necessary trade-offs to benefit the entire system. This might mean that no single stakeholder is happy, but that all stakeholders will gain in the long run. 
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Top CEO group Business Roundtable drops shareholder primacy in favor of sustainable value creation, and their letter deserves action

Top CEO group Business Roundtable drops shareholder primacy in favor of sustainable value creation, and their letter deserves action | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In a monumental step toward setting broader standards for corporate leadership, the lobbying group Business Roundtable is endorsing stakeholder capitalism. Is it achievable?
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Rick Wartzman, an scholar and advocate of Peter Drucker's management philosophy, thinks every management student should read last August's letter from the Business Roundtable. He believes this might represent a monumental step toward the "future fit" business--one where stakeholder value creation and shareholder value creation are united, integral, and win-win-win synergistically related to help advance the kind of innovation that benefits the world and benefits business. Here is the letter in full:  

 WASHINGTON – Business Roundtable announced the release of a new Statement on the Purpose of a Corporation signed by 181 CEOs who commit to lead their companies for the benefit of all stakeholders – customers, employees, suppliers, communities and shareholders. 

 Since 1978, Business Roundtable has periodically issued Principles of Corporate Governance. Each version of the document issued since 1997 has endorsed principles of shareholder primacy – that corporations exist principally to serve shareholders. With today’s announcement, the new Statement supersedes previous statements and outlines a modern standard for corporate responsibility. 

 “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, Chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Chairman of Business Roundtable. “Major employers are investing in their workers and communities because they know it is the only way to be successful over the long term. These modernized principles reflect the business community’s unwavering commitment to continue to push for an economy that serves all Americans.” 

 “This new statement better reflects the way corporations can and should operate today,” added Alex Gorsky, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Johnson & Johnson and Chair of the Business Roundtable Corporate Governance Committee. “It affirms the essential role corporations can play in improving our society when CEOs are truly committed to meeting the needs of all stakeholders.” Industry leaders also lent their support for the updated Business Roundtable Statement, citing the positive impact this commitment will have on long-term value creation: “I welcome this thoughtful statement by Business Roundtable CEOs on the Purpose of a Corporation. By taking a broader, more complete view of corporate purpose, boards can focus on creating long-term value, better serving everyone – investors, employees, communities, suppliers and customers,” said Bill McNabb, former CEO of Vanguard. “CEOs work to generate profits and return value to shareholders, but the best-run companies do more. They put the customer first and invest in their employees and communities. In the end, it’s the most promising way to build long-term value,” said Tricia Griffith, President and CEO of Progressive Corporation. “

This is tremendous news because it is more critical than ever that businesses in the 21st century are focused on generating long-term value for all stakeholders and addressing the challenges we face, which will result in shared prosperity and sustainability for both business and society,” said Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation. The Business Roundtable Statement on the Purpose of a Corporation is below and the full list of signatories is available here. Statement on the Purpose of a Corporation Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through hard work and creativity and to lead a life of meaning and dignity. We believe the free-market system is the best means of generating good jobs, a strong and sustainable economy, innovation, a healthy environment and economic opportunity for all. 

 Businesses play a vital role in the economy by creating jobs, fostering innovation and providing essential goods and services. Businesses make and sell consumer products; manufacture equipment and vehicles; support the national defense; grow and produce food; provide health care; generate and deliver energy; and offer financial, communications and other services that underpin economic growth. While each of our individual companies serves its own corporate purpose, we share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders. We commit to: Delivering value to our customers. We will further the tradition of American companies leading the way in meeting or exceeding customer expectations. Investing in our employees. This starts with compensating them fairly and providing important benefits. It also includes supporting them through training and education that help develop new skills for a rapidly changing world. We foster diversity and inclusion, dignity and respect. Dealing fairly and ethically with our suppliers. We are dedicated to serving as good partners to the other companies, large and small, that help us meet our missions. Supporting the communities in which we work. We respect the people in our communities and protect the environment by embracing sustainable practices across our businesses. 

Generating long-term value for shareholders, who provide the capital that allows companies to invest, grow and innovate. We are committed to transparency and effective engagement with shareholders. Each of our stakeholders is essential. We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Why Walmart and Other Companies Are Sticking With the Paris Climate Deal --And are Pursuing Stakeholder Value Putting Business on a Trajectory to Be Part of the Solution Revolution

Why Walmart and Other Companies Are Sticking With the Paris Climate Deal --And are Pursuing Stakeholder Value Putting Business on a Trajectory to Be Part of the Solution Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

President Trump’s decision to actually  pull out of the Paris Agreement will hurt the economy, business, people, and the planet.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Walmart is one of over 3,800 American businesses, states, cities and other entities that have joined together in the coalition "We Are Still In" to continue our efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to meet the social, ecological, and economic empowerment goals of the Paris Agreement. These companies believe that Trump's decision to actually pull out of the Paris Agreement will severely hurt the economy, the planet, and the future value-creation and innovation potentials of these companies. And it is an impressive group.  Together, these entities represent nearly 70 percent of the USA's gross domestic product and two-thirds of its population.  If this group--these businesses, cities, and states-- were a country, it would be the world’s second-largest economy — behind the United States but ahead of China. 

These are fast-changing times. Old certainties are collapsing around us and people are scrambling for new ways of being in the world. Especially in business, leaders increasingly want to be part of the solution revolution--and not be caught in the old Friedman doctrine "that the only business of business is business."  Pitting high purpose business as something quite the opposite of profit, and government collaboration as something antithetical to economic innovation--and where only binary choices areas offered between capitalism and socialism--causes standoffs instead of creativity. These old ‘isms soon’ lurk in the shadows of any discussion on capitalism --and make it hard to fully appreciate why a WalMart would be proud and public in its' "We are still in" the Paris agreement stance. The author William Gibson has a term for this effect: “semiotic ghosts”; one concept that haunts another, regardless of any useful or intended connection. Indeed a recent Fast Company article argues for the need for imagination: "instead of fixating on a fight between capitalism and socialism, imagine innovating a future economy that transcends old binaries." 
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian
Scoop.it!

Tech’s woke CEO takes the stage

Tech’s woke CEO takes the stage | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“That’s what I’m doing every day,” Benioff says. “Leading with those values.”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
What drives Salesforce CEO Benioff? To hear him tell it, as a young, disillusioned Oracle executive on an obligatory trip to an Indian ashram, he came to see that success in the business world was worthwhile only if married to improving the world, and he’s since dedicated his enormous fortune — some $6.9 billion by one recent count — to proving the point.
No comment yet.