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Music and Emotion —

Music and Emotion — | Audio Production | Scoop.it
Most of us also listen to music in order to experience emotions. The specific mechanisms through which music evokes emotions is a rich field of research, with a great number of unanswered questions. Why does sound talk to our emotional brain? Why do we perceive emotional information in musical featu

Via the first club™
Charles Rhodes's insight:
To be a great audio producer is to find what pulls on the audiences emotion. Do you want them to feel sad, happy, excited, etc. This article pulls together ideas from a vast authority on the subject. I giant list of references is towards the bottom of the article making this a very credible source. A great read for someone searching for the understanding of the audio/music field.
the first club™'s curator insight, December 18, 2019 6:05 AM

Why Music is such a good tool to connect emotionally to your consumers.

#LoyaltyProgram #RewardProgram

Heena's comment, February 4, 6:10 AM
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Rescooped by Charles Rhodes from Loyalty Marketing & Rewards
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Music and Emotion —

Music and Emotion — | Audio Production | Scoop.it
Most of us also listen to music in order to experience emotions. The specific mechanisms through which music evokes emotions is a rich field of research, with a great number of unanswered questions. Why does sound talk to our emotional brain? Why do we perceive emotional information in musical featu

Via the first club™
Charles Rhodes's insight:
To be a great audio producer is to find what pulls on the audiences emotion. Do you want them to feel sad, happy, excited, etc. This article pulls together ideas from a vast authority on the subject. I giant list of references is towards the bottom of the article making this a very credible source. A great read for someone searching for the understanding of the audio/music field.
the first club™'s curator insight, December 18, 2019 6:05 AM

Why Music is such a good tool to connect emotionally to your consumers.

#LoyaltyProgram #RewardProgram

Heena's comment, February 4, 6:10 AM
http://bit.ly/39DeTo
http://bit.ly/39DeTo
http://bit.ly/39DeTo
Rescooped by Charles Rhodes from Raspberry Pi
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Nothing Sounds Quite Like An 808 in the TECnology Hall of Fame #MusicMonday « Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers!

Nothing Sounds Quite Like An 808 in the TECnology Hall of Fame #MusicMonday « Adafruit Industries – Makers, hackers, artists, designers and engineers! | Audio Production | Scoop.it
via SonicState The TECnology Hall of Fame, presented by the NAMM Museum of Making Music, honors audio products and innovations that have made a significant contribution to the advancement of audio …...

Via F. Thunus
Charles Rhodes's insight:
Interesting article on an old piece of audio technology. I defiantly need to give this a listen. Well read article even not the most credible piece. It does leave you wanting to go buy yourself this drum tool. A great piece of history in the audio field.
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Rescooped by Charles Rhodes from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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8 Great iPad Audio Recording Apps for Teachers and Students - Educators Technology

8 Great iPad Audio Recording Apps for Teachers and Students - Educators Technology | Audio Production | Scoop.it
For those of you asking about audio recording apps to use on iPad, here is a list of some of the best options out there.  Whether you want to record a lecture, an audio note, a memo, or simply capture ideas and thoughts as they happen, the apps below provide you with the necessary technology to do so, and in the easiest and most effective way.

Via John Evans
Charles Rhodes's insight:
Great starting place when searching for a recording app for your Ipad. This article will give you a nice summary of each app. The information seems credible, but it did not include references. I would also keep a look out for an updated version, since they are always coming out with something new. Great starting place for those looking into audio technology.
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Rescooped by Charles Rhodes from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Music is the language we all share

Music is the language we all share | Audio Production | Scoop.it
Harvard's Music Lab has spent five years compiling a large database of thousands of songs from all over the world — with some striking similarities.

Via Charles Tiayon
Charles Rhodes's insight:
Very well thought out piece on the world of music. Audio and music come hand and hand, and this article truly tells the great work music has accomplished. Very credible piece with great quotes from the source material. Audio may not always be about music, but music will always be about audio.
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 29, 2019 11:45 PM

Versions of the Tower of Babel origin myth exist in many cultures as a way to explain why we humans speak so many different languages around the globe. While there's still no common tongue to unite us all, there might, perhaps, be another way to communicate with our fellow Earthlings: music.

Along with his colleagues, Samuel Mehr of Harvard University set out to discover if music really is universal across all languages. Harkening back to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's 1835 declaration that "music is the universal language of mankind," the team wanted hard evidence of this conventional wisdom.

 

Gathering the music of the world, both ancient and modern, both love songs and mournful ballads, was no small task.

For the past five years, Mehr and his team have been hunting down hundreds of recordings, from public libraries to obscure private collections. Their project, dubbed The Natural History of Song, is a database of almost 5,000 descriptions of songs and song performances from 60 human societies.

"We are so used to being able to find any piece of music that we like on the internet," said Mehr, who is now a principal investigator at Harvard's Music Lab. "But there are thousands and thousands of recordings buried in archives that are not accessible online. We didn't know what we would find: at one point we found an odd-looking call number, asked a Harvard librarian for help, and twenty minutes later she wheeled out a cart of about 20 cases of reel-to-reel recordings of traditional Celtic music."

Sing us a song

An Australian brass band in 1906. (Photo: Unknown [public domain]/Wikimedia Commons)

This is the team's largest and most ambitious study to date, with the full results recently published in Science.

The study was truly universal, with musicians, data scientists, psychologists, linguists and political scientists all participating in this international collaboration.

More than just music, the scientists drilled down, sorting the songs and song performances into 60 variables for easy cross-referencing. The variables included the demographics of singers and audience members; the presence of instruments and special costumes; the duration of the song; and the time of day. Keywords were also assigned to events leading up to a song performance, as well as its behavioral context, function and lyrics.

A second database focused solely on four categories of songs: lullabies, love songs, healing songs and dance songs. Despite their differences, songs in each category shared underlying structural concepts, which could be considered the "grammar" or building blocks of music.

"As a graduate student, I was working on studies of infant music perception and I started to see all these studies that made claims about music being universal," Mehr explains. "How is it that every paper on music starts out with this big claim but there's never a citation backing that up ... Now we can back that up."

Test your ears

A screenshot of Harvard's Music Lab world music quiz. (Photo: Harvard Music Lab)

If you'd like to test your own musical acumen, the folks at Harvard's Music Lab have kindly put together some interactive quizzes for your listening pleasure (and that link takes a few seconds to build, so be patient). The world music quiz plays snippets of songs in one of the four aforementioned categories, then asks you to guess if the crooning is for a baby, a sickly person, a lover or those just wanting to dance.

From a lullaby sung by the Native American Hopi tribe to a dance song from the Maasai people of Tanzania to a healing song performed by a member of the Anggor people of Papua New Guinea, you might be surprised to see how many songs you can correctly categorize.

Mehr, who began his academic studies in music education, looks forward to further studies on "musical grammar," and breaking down age-old assumptions.

"In music theory, tonality is often assumed to be an invention of Western music, but our data raise the controversial possibility that this could be a universal feature of music," Mehr adds. "That raises pressing questions about structure that underlies music everywhere — and whether and how our minds are designed to make music."

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Timeline: Which Came First, Language Or Music? | Vermont Public Radio

Timeline: Which Came First, Language Or Music? | Vermont Public Radio | Audio Production | Scoop.it
Which came first, language or music? It’s not just a “chicken or the egg” type of question. Many linguists and theorists have debated this subject. For a

Via Charles Tiayon
Charles Rhodes's insight:
Great article on the lineage of sound. I never would even imagine a question as deep as this. Outstanding credibility when it comes to references of a higher learning. Very little to do with audio production, but a very interesting article to read.
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, February 18, 2:02 AM

Which came first, language or music? It’s not just a “chicken or the egg” type of question. Many linguists and theorists have debated this subject. For a long time the accepted norm stated that music appears “to be derived from language,” meaning that music is a subset of verbal communication. Howver, modern research is painting a different picture. There’s an earlier episode of Timeline called “Baby Talk” that dives into that research regarding the development of human communication. 

I’m still stuck on the question, language or music? It just seems to spark a thousand more questions. When did we, as humans, first start creating music? Can we define what we even mean by the word “music”? When did the grunts and growls of humanity become tones and pitch? Could there songs that predate language? Has a mother always sung minor thirds over her child as she cradles them? Have lovers always cooed to each other to express their affection?

BERNSTEIN: But where do these notes come from? Why do our ears select certain notes and not others?

JAMES: In 1973, Leonard Bernstein gave a set of six lectures at Harvard called “The Unanswered Question” in which he attempts to answer “wither music?” Where does music come from?  Throughout the course of his lectures he lays out evidence of music’s source in linguistics, aesthetics and philosophy. He speaks to music as a natural expression of humanity.

BERNSTEIN: Again, we must ask why just those notes in that particular order?

JAMES: In the first of these lectures, Bernstein draws a connection between linguistic phonemes, the vocal sounds that make up words, and the motives of music, the germs of musical ideas. The building blocks of language are the vocal sounds that come naturally to the human species. A good example is the sound made as you hum and then open your mouth. In most languages, in fact almost all, the syllable “ma” means mother, the source of life for every infant. Babies soon learn to call for “ma” when they’re in need.

Let’s take a moment to analyze that little word, “Ma.” It begins with an attack, the letter M, and then a vowel sound. The vowel can be short or it can be sustained.

BERNSTEIN: MA! And low and behold, we are singing. Music is born. The syllable has become a note.

JAMES: Bernstein’s point is that even this simple word is musical and relies on musical sensibilities to convey meaning. There is rhythm and pitch involved in simply stating the word in context. The “Ah” of “Ma” can go down, like you are calling your mother, or it can go up as if you are asking her a question. The emotion you feel as you say the word will dictate the volume, pitch and duration of how you say it. This is a musical way of looking at all spoken language.

As we stated in the previous episode “Baby Talk,” the latest research is pointing to the idea that music and language were developed in tandem, evolving together as humans evolved. Our words convey meaning based on the musicality of our speech.

Find out how and when music changed the world and follow the Timeline.

Zechariah Thomas V's curator insight, February 23, 4:42 PM
(opinion)
I personally think that language came first. It just doesn't make sense that music would come first.


 I think that to create music you have to incorporate some type of language. Like for example Hispanics tend to speak Espanol, which is incorporated into their  music, their own sound. Hispanic Music.

this source could be resourceful for audio industry professional. 
For people who desire to understand music from different countries. They will have to learn about the language first to get some type of understanding of the music.