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Unit 7. Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Unit 7. Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | APHUG | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.

Ethan Bernick's insight:

Burma's capital city boasts magnificent golf courses and buildings but has almost no one living there. The city is extremely strict and one man was sent to prison for three years for merely photographing it. Its twenty lane highways bear no cars.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:02 PM

this just goes to prove that there needs to be an economic reason for people to move. if you build it, they will not come. they will stay where the money is, and ignore the 'honor' of living in the new capital city.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:46 PM

I strange but not historically unprecedented situation. This kind of reminds me of all the cities China built in compensation for population growth. Historically the only way cities like this succeed is either by enticing immigration with tax cuts, free house etc or it has been forcefully with entire populations being moved (the latter being what the ancients largely did creating cities like Alexandria). Another example of capital moving is Iran however how they got a population in theirs I am not aware.Burma committed to neither and as a result the city is a failure. The cities layout also seems a bit extreme given it was made to suppress rather than entice. What is really bad however is the loss of agricultural land and ancestral villages in the area being destroyed all clearly for nothing. At the very least the country may be slowly moving away from dictatorship but only time will tell. Hopefully this failure will force further concessions making it a more tolerable place to live. Only then true solutions will likely be found to their poverty since the dictatorship has been seemingly incompetent in its actions.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 17, 2018 11:14 PM
Burma is a country that is facing a situation that seems to be pretty unique.  The government is in a constant battle to maintain their reputation in the international community and attempt to paint an image of themselves that doesn’t accurately represent what is occurring domestically.  Aside from the unrecognized genocide that the Rhohingan population is facing that the government barely acknowledges, the country is suffering from extreme poverty and a government that is only concerned with maintaining power.  The move of the capital city exemplifies this problem quite well.  The biggest city in Burma is Rangoon which was previously its capital.  The government decided to move the capital city to Naypyidaw that was built to be a modern, world class city in 2005 and cost about $4 billion to build.  It contains well-maintained infrastructure and landscaping and contains many of the things nice cities have like golf courses and zoos.  The government thought that moving the capital city would draw people out of Rangoon and the city would expand.  However, their thought was very wrong.  Many people couldn’t afford to make the move, didn’t like the jobs they were being offered, and the commute between the two cities is less than ideal.  In fact the highway between the Rangoon and Naypyidaw has been nicknamed the “Death Highway” because so many fatal accidents occur on it, not to mention it takes five hours to make the drive.  Plane tickets are too expensive for most Burmese people as well. This has created a strange emptiness in the capital city that many describe as a ghost town.  The government’s public reasoning for moving the city was to help alleviate the overcrowded conditions of Rangoon and build a more appealing city.  But documents have revealed the government’s real reason for moving was to protect themselves from opposition, which is evidenced by the fact that the parliament building is surrounded by a moat.  Although the government is no longer considered a dictatorship, the old power dynamics are in place.  More than ten years after Naypyidaw was established, it is still virtually empty.  Visitors to the city also have noted that many of the structures in the city are good looking on the outside, but falling apart on the inside.  Residents that work in the city usually do not make enough money to enjoy the luxuries of Naypyidaw either.  
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unit 5. Food Sovereignty & The Food Movement - Roots of Change

unit 5. Food Sovereignty & The Food Movement - Roots of Change | APHUG | Scoop.it
Food fighters from Northern California recently reminded the ROC team that we can also take back our food systems from the ground up in our local communities. In doing so we can improve health, revitalize local economies and heal the land and soil that has been degraded by industrial farming techniques. Having control of our own food sources and choices is called food sovereignty. As the Forum for Food Sovereignty in Sélingué, Mali, stated in 2007, “It puts those who produce, distribute and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies rather than the demands of markets and corporations. It defends the interests and inclusion of the next generation.” Food sovereignty in both the developed and developing world is at the heart of the food movement.

Via ThePlanetaryArchives/BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco
Ethan Bernick's insight:

FOOD SOVEREIGNTY- that's the idea of this article. The local food movement is all about taking back the food sources and ownership.This can also improve soil, health, and reduce fossil fuel use. 

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unit 5. Big Poultry Isn’t Just Terrible for Chickens—It Treats Farmers Poorly Too

unit 5. Big Poultry Isn’t Just Terrible for Chickens—It Treats Farmers Poorly Too | APHUG | Scoop.it
Sunday’s episode of ‘Last Week Tonight’ took an in-depth look at the plight of contract farming.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Modern poultry farming is based on large scale, vertically integrated production. The farmers are usually at a loss of money due to the constant obsolescence of poultry houses.  

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Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 5:07 PM

this article relates to unit 5 because it deals with modern agriculture. In addition it relates to this unit because it talks about the farmers response to this agriculture and how the farmers are treated. This article is about how the raising large chickens is not only bad for the chickens themselves, but for the farmers as well.The article notes that  the farmers own the land and the equipment, but the poultry company owns the birds and feed.  Most farmers who rely on contract poultry farming for their source of income live under the poverty line. Sometimes farmers will speak up about their work, but it requires them to stay within protocols in order for them to receive payment. For example Craig Watts was under scrutiny for allowing people to film the inside of his facilities.. There is a way to help this though, there is a agriculture bill that was previously turned down by the house Committee. It could be up for consideration again and this would give farmers more voice to stand up in legal court.

Barrett Baughn's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:03 PM

This article is about a show that every once and a while talks about animal cruelty in industry farms. However one night he talked more about how poorly the farmers are treated and how inhumane their jobs are. They are payed ridiculously poorly and they have to do things most people wouldn't be able to imagine. The worst part is that they are not allowed to talk about it or they run the risk of being fired and out of a job.

 

This is apart of our Agriculture unit. It describes what these workers have to go through everyday of their lives in poultry factories and how horrendous it really is. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:54 AM

This article talks about how poultry farm are not only treating their chickens bad, but also treating their farmers bad. The article gives two example of how farmers were scrutinized for allowing an animal welfare group to film and many more. 

 

This article relates to Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use because it talks about the cruelty and coldness of the poultry farms owners. It gives you inside on how bad it has gotten, and it promotes awareness of how we are allowing people to be I humane towards chickens and farmers. We should definitely do something because it will only get worse.

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unit 4. 14-Year-Old 'Kid Warrior' Rallies Youth Around the World to Protect the Planet » EcoWatch

unit 4. 14-Year-Old 'Kid Warrior' Rallies Youth Around the World to Protect the Planet » EcoWatch | APHUG | Scoop.it
Watch Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, the 14-year-old director of Earth Guardians, in this Kid Warrior video. He's a youth activist working to stop climate change

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This young environmentalist is not the only one trying to save humans from their own destruction of the Earth. Many others are working diligently alike but this will not be enough. Countries must begin to regulate pollution and resource use.

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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:45 PM

This blog tells the story of Xiuhtezcatl Martinez. He is a 14 year boy who is also an environmental activist. He has presented in front of schools, citizens, and even government councils on behalf of his beliefs, and has been awarded for his work by the president himself. This blog can be related to geography, and agriculture.

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unit 1. Save the Children releases global motherhood rankings - CNN.com

unit 1. Save the Children releases global motherhood rankings - CNN.com | APHUG | Scoop.it
The United States continues to be outpaced by smaller countries in its treatment of its mothers, ranking 33rd on a new list of 179 countries.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

The major North/South divide across the globe also can be helpful to indicate maternal health. The top five were in the north and the bottom five were, of course, largely south.

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Mrs. B's curator insight, May 8, 2015 1:24 PM

Happy Mother's Day!

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, May 9, 2015 8:39 AM

To all the mothers out there...

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 1:30 AM

It is extremely pathetic that the United States, one of the wealthiest countries in the world, ranks relatively poorly when it comes to maternal wellbeing. I think it just shows that even if a country is rich, it doesn't mean that the country is allocating its money and resources toward the right causes, such as providing better maternal healthcare and resources for mothers. The Nordic and Scandinavian continue to be ranked highly in GDI and HDI, which reflect onto their Mother's Index rating. The United States needs to focus on providing better healthcare to mothers. The U.S. also ranks poorly when it comes to infant mortality. More emphasis needs to placed on these issues, for mothers bear the future of society, literally. 

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unit 7. How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This video is applicable to suburbanization in the fact that many of the same factors go into it. Suburbs too need order but sometimes too ordered can be bad. Growth limitations also have to be set.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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unit 7. Austin, then and now

unit 7. Austin, then and now | APHUG | Scoop.it

"Drag or swipe the slider to see how Austin's downtown skyline has changed over time."

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This is an example of the CBD. Outside of the CBD you can see residential areas making this applicable to the concentric and possibly sector model. 

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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:29 PM

This can show how quickly areas can develop if giving the right economic opportunities and a strong government.  

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:21 AM

A wave of New Urbanism has spread through Austin, with downtown growth, especially in high-rises on the rapid increase over the past decade as demand for high-price residences downtown rises with the influx of young and educated people into the city.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:35 AM

Services & Urbanization-CBD

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unit 1. Stephen Hawking Has Dire Prediction For Humanity

unit 1. Stephen Hawking Has Dire Prediction For Humanity | APHUG | Scoop.it
Renowned British physicist and author Stephen Hawking has a dire prediction for humanity: We will not survive another millennium unless we colonize another planet.

"I don't think we will survi

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This scoop shows the concept of space organization and nature in the fact that humans are not being sustainable at all.

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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:51 PM

this blog informs the reader of Stephan Hawking's strong belief in that the human race must look to space to survive. He suggests that with the next millennium humans must colonize other planets in order to keep us alive.

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:55 AM

this scoop was interesting because what makes us think that we should believe in a man whose theories have been proven wrong?   

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unit 3. Namibia: 'the land God made in anger'

unit 3. Namibia: 'the land God made in anger' | APHUG | Scoop.it
Namibia’s haunting landscapes carry Gavin Bell back to the birth of a nation which today celebrates 25 years of independence
Ethan Bernick's insight:

A barren land, Nambia holds only a couple of million people but it three times as large as Britain. There are little resources here and it is very hard to grow anything. This is why they say that God made this land in anger.

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From ice age to digital age, 'Historical Atlas of Maine' complete after 15 ... - Bangor Daily News

From ice age to digital age, 'Historical Atlas of Maine' complete after 15 ... - Bangor Daily News | APHUG | Scoop.it
After 15 years, the creation of nearly 100 maps, countless hours spent pouring over old documents and lots of careful editing, the “Historical Atlas of Maine,” a colorful, fact-packed tome detailing 15,000 years of Maine history, has finally been...
Ethan Bernick's insight:

The University of Maine press published a book detailing the physical and political mapping of Maine over the last 15,000 years. 

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Unit 6. City of Miami dealing with new industrial waste plume - Miami News Record

Unit 6. City of Miami dealing with new industrial waste plume - Miami News Record | APHUG | Scoop.it
MIAMI – The City of Miami may be forced to deal with yet another industrial waste plume beneath an abandoned manufacturing plant within the city.
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Abandon research facility in Miami, FL is currently in the hands of a bankruptcy trust that may go out of business soon. Beneath the facility is two chlorinated solvent plumes. These plumes may contaminate ground water and surrounding area if not handled properly.

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Unit 3. What It Feels Like to Be a 'Demographic Threat' to Israel - The Nation.

Unit 3. What It Feels Like to Be a 'Demographic Threat' to Israel - The Nation. | APHUG | Scoop.it
Yousef Munayyer: What It Feels Like to Be a ‘Demographic Threat’ to Israel
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This article tells of the way it feels to be globally perceived as a threatening stateless nation. The woman in the article wishes for views to change and would like for there to be a better understanding of the Palestinian people.  

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Unit 7. Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia

Unit 7. Burma's bizarre capital: a super-sized slice of post-apocalypse suburbia | APHUG | Scoop.it
The purpose-built city of Naypyidaw – unveiled a decade ago this year – boasts 20-lane highways, golf courses, fast Wi-Fi and reliable electricity. The only thing it doesn’t seem to have is people, report Matt Kennard and Claire Provost

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, urban, urbanism.

Ethan Bernick's insight:

Burma's capital city boasts magnificent golf courses and buildings but has almost no one living there. The city is extremely strict and one man was sent to prison for three years for merely photographing it. Its twenty lane highways bear no cars.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:02 PM

this just goes to prove that there needs to be an economic reason for people to move. if you build it, they will not come. they will stay where the money is, and ignore the 'honor' of living in the new capital city.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 4:46 PM

I strange but not historically unprecedented situation. This kind of reminds me of all the cities China built in compensation for population growth. Historically the only way cities like this succeed is either by enticing immigration with tax cuts, free house etc or it has been forcefully with entire populations being moved (the latter being what the ancients largely did creating cities like Alexandria). Another example of capital moving is Iran however how they got a population in theirs I am not aware.Burma committed to neither and as a result the city is a failure. The cities layout also seems a bit extreme given it was made to suppress rather than entice. What is really bad however is the loss of agricultural land and ancestral villages in the area being destroyed all clearly for nothing. At the very least the country may be slowly moving away from dictatorship but only time will tell. Hopefully this failure will force further concessions making it a more tolerable place to live. Only then true solutions will likely be found to their poverty since the dictatorship has been seemingly incompetent in its actions.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 17, 2018 11:14 PM
Burma is a country that is facing a situation that seems to be pretty unique.  The government is in a constant battle to maintain their reputation in the international community and attempt to paint an image of themselves that doesn’t accurately represent what is occurring domestically.  Aside from the unrecognized genocide that the Rhohingan population is facing that the government barely acknowledges, the country is suffering from extreme poverty and a government that is only concerned with maintaining power.  The move of the capital city exemplifies this problem quite well.  The biggest city in Burma is Rangoon which was previously its capital.  The government decided to move the capital city to Naypyidaw that was built to be a modern, world class city in 2005 and cost about $4 billion to build.  It contains well-maintained infrastructure and landscaping and contains many of the things nice cities have like golf courses and zoos.  The government thought that moving the capital city would draw people out of Rangoon and the city would expand.  However, their thought was very wrong.  Many people couldn’t afford to make the move, didn’t like the jobs they were being offered, and the commute between the two cities is less than ideal.  In fact the highway between the Rangoon and Naypyidaw has been nicknamed the “Death Highway” because so many fatal accidents occur on it, not to mention it takes five hours to make the drive.  Plane tickets are too expensive for most Burmese people as well. This has created a strange emptiness in the capital city that many describe as a ghost town.  The government’s public reasoning for moving the city was to help alleviate the overcrowded conditions of Rangoon and build a more appealing city.  But documents have revealed the government’s real reason for moving was to protect themselves from opposition, which is evidenced by the fact that the parliament building is surrounded by a moat.  Although the government is no longer considered a dictatorship, the old power dynamics are in place.  More than ten years after Naypyidaw was established, it is still virtually empty.  Visitors to the city also have noted that many of the structures in the city are good looking on the outside, but falling apart on the inside.  Residents that work in the city usually do not make enough money to enjoy the luxuries of Naypyidaw either.  
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unit 6. ObamaCare outreach campaigns microtargeting uninsured - The Hill

unit 6. ObamaCare outreach campaigns microtargeting uninsured - The Hill | APHUG | Scoop.it
'Navigators' say they hope to increase health insurance coverage in rural areas.
Ethan Bernick's insight:

New campaign trying to "fill the gaps" of ObamaCare by reaching out to rural areas. They hope to get more people insured in ObamaCares second year by making enrolling more accessible and making sure to not use a one size fits all approach.

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unit 5. Ghana's women farmers resist the G7 plan to grab Africa's seeds

unit 5. Ghana's women farmers resist the G7 plan to grab Africa's seeds | APHUG | Scoop.it
Sharing and saving seed is a crucial part of traditional farming all over Africa, writes Heidi Chow. Maybe that's why governments, backed by multinational seed companies, are imposing oppressive seed laws that attack the continent's main food producers and open the way to industrial agribusiness. But Ghana's women farmers are having none of it.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Women of Ghana rely on exchanging seeds to ensure good producing crop the next season. Corporations want to change the way these farmers get their seeds by making them buy the seeds from the companies instead.

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Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, May 25, 2015 3:17 PM

This article discusses how the sharing and saving of seeds for farming is being threatened by a new law, Monsanto's Law, which would restrict and forbid farmers to keep their seeds for the next year. Trading and saving seeds helps farmers know how the crop will do, and what type of environment is needed to ensure the most produce out of the crop. It also saves the farmers lots of money because they don't have to invest in buying new seeds for the new season. By passing this law, farmers will have to buy new commercialized seeds every season which could be fueled with GMOs, or may not be adapted to Africa's environment, this all threatens the profits and food farmers make. Women in Ghana, apart of the Rural Women's Farmers Association of Ghana, are resisting this law and trying to preserve the tradition of saving and trading seed. 

This article relates to Unit Five, Agriculture and Rural Land Use, because it shows traditional farming methods and how women in agriculture are trying to preserve tradition and prevent commercialized farming and seeds from coming to their communities. 

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unit 4. How the World Celebrates Easter in 15 Spectacular Photos

unit 4. How the World Celebrates Easter in 15 Spectacular Photos | APHUG | Scoop.it
From eggs to bunnies, there are almost as many ways to observe Easter as there are countries.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Easter, being a widespread holiday, can be considered as a centripetal force. The holiday is a time when people come together to celebrate the rising of Christ and brings many together.

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zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 4:54 PM

this blog provides photos to demonstrate the different ways easter is celebrated around the world. It surprisingly fascinating how specific cultures and variations in religion change there celebration.This blog can be classified in the religion unit

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unit 4. Up to 4 Percent of Africa's Rhinos Might Relocate to South Texas

unit 4. Up to 4 Percent of Africa's Rhinos Might Relocate to South Texas | APHUG | Scoop.it
With an endangered population that continues to be poached for its horns, every preventitive measure—even odd ones—should be considered. 

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Africa's iconic animal, the rhino, may take refuge in South Texas due to poaching. This is a drastic measure to protect the animal that transcends national borders.

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Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:30 PM

The rhino population has decreased from 70,000 in 1970 to 25,000. They are often killed by hunters who kill them for there horns. These hunters then sell them on the black market for about 350,000 per horn. In order to save the rhinos from going extinct they have considered relocating 4 percent of Africa;s rhinos to South Texas. This could be an example of historical trends of population and projections for the future, because after seeing the decreasing trends of the population of rhinos, they are predicted to be extinct in the next 25 years. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:54 PM

This article deals with unit 2 because it discusses population and migration of Rhino's. There are only 25,000 African Rhino's left in the wild today. This is significantly lower than in 1970 when there was 70,000. The dwindling of rhino's is due to poaching.Three rhino's are killed every day for their horns. The rhino's horns are worth $90,000 for one once and on average a horn is 4 ounces. On a continent the average income a year is $1,700 killing a rhino for over 350,000 dollars could be worth breaking the law to some of them. An action to preserve the rhino's os moving 1,000 of them to Texas. The organization intends to adopt them into homes. The adoption will require a background check, but it is not easy to raise a rhino either. First it is very expensive and it can grow up to 5,100 pounds 5 times the average cow. This is a plan that is not fully worked out yet but if if could save the rhino's by putting them in Texas the article says it is worth a try. 

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unit 1. With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating

unit 1. With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating | APHUG | Scoop.it

"More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores)."

 

Tags: food distribution, place, food, religion, ethnicity.


Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Each region of the USA varies at different degrees. The distribution of Mormons in Utah greatly increases the amount of candy consumed in the area. This could be a perceived region.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:25 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks about how Utah eats twice the national average in candy. After investigation, Hershey's co. discovered that it is a religious taboo, because without alcohol or tobacco, many Mormons (the predominant religious group in Utah) eat candy instead.

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 3 because it shows how cultural taboos can effect industry. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:15 PM

Me as a mormon completely understand the desire of candy. Yes alcohol, drugs, tobacco, ect is frowned upon but what intrigues me the most is how candy is so dominant in that region.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:08 PM

More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores).

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unit 6. Cover Story

unit 6. Cover Story | APHUG | Scoop.it
An insight into the glamorous world of hijabi fashion and how it reflects social change in Turkey.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Women used to have to cover there whole body in public but it is now becoming more acceptable to show ones face in the places like Turkey. A middle class of women is emerging.

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Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 10:21 AM

I think the change in what Turkish women have been beginning to wear helps them express them self. Being covered in long clothes hides them and their true beauty. They should have the freedom to wear whatever they want. This is an example of popular culture diffusion around the world. 

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unit 1. Zambia lifts big cat hunting ban - Africa Geographic

unit 1. Zambia lifts big cat hunting ban - Africa Geographic | APHUG | Scoop.it
Zambia lifts ban on safari hunting to attract tourists.

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Interactions among different countries are increasing as a result of globalization. Interactions can be a good thing such as tourism.

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unit 5. How your food would look if not genetically modified over millennia | Genetic Literacy Project

unit 5. How your food would look if not genetically modified over millennia | Genetic Literacy Project | APHUG | Scoop.it
How your food would look if not genetically modified over millennia | February 2, 2015 | Genetic Literacy Project

Via Mrs. B
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This article is misinformed and is saying that hybridization is no different than genetic modification. 

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:59 AM

This is a very short yet important article that shows what foods would look like without genetic modification. Where would the world be without genetic modification honestly. We wouldn't have any kind of agribusiness or commercialization of food. With the bringing about of the green revolution food was changed forever. First was the domestication of plants and animals and next was the industrial revolution that made it possible for more food to be produced and processed easier. Maybe GMOs are a good thing because the foods in that picture don't look like they could sustain a thriving world.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:04 PM

Biotechnology, including genetically modified organisms (GMO)-


This article explains how your food would look like without GMO's today, and how they look and seem completely different. Without the agriculture used over millennia, and the constant picking of best crops by farmers, our food would not be as good as it is today.


This article portrays the idea of how our adaptions of agriculture has saved us through GMO's or the picking of best crops. Without these pickings, we would not be able to farm as well as we do today, and would not have the tasty food we have.

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 2015 3:36 PM

This article relating to unit 5 (agriculture) reveals the reality of what our foods would be like without GMO's, as well as noting that a lot of our "organic" foods were chemically created

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unit 3. Complications of Race and Class Fuel Perceptions of UVA Incident

unit 3. Complications of Race and Class Fuel Perceptions of UVA Incident | APHUG | Scoop.it

Last week's assault of U of Virginia student Martese Hill by state Alcoholic Beverage Control agents reflects how history, current events, and town/gown relationships complicate and fuel racially-charged incidents.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Ethan Bernick's insight:

University of Virginia students reflect on how the states Alcoholic Beverage Control appears to be targeting African American students. They say it is like something you would see in the news happening before their eyes. 

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Unit 2. Human Geography - population

This video shows how population has increased over time, and where in the world it has increased? What do you notice? This is an example of Human Geography, can you think of any other examples.
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This video depicts the growing population of the world from 1 AD to a projected growth of 2020. The video shows not much change throughout the Roman Empire rule and steady, but slow, growth throughout the Islamic and Viking Eras with population decreases usually seen around times of famine and disease and empire downfalls. The populations explode after industrialization in the late 1800s.

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Unit 6. Seattle's Nyland skilled at working across school factions - The Seattle Times

Unit 6. Seattle's Nyland skilled at working across school factions - The Seattle Times | APHUG | Scoop.it
In four short months, interim Seattle Public Schools chief Larry Nyland has managed to win the trust of local education groups that have often clashed. The Seattle School Board will vote Wednesday on whether to name him permanent superintendent.
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Larry Nyland is an outstanding Seattle Public Schools chief who has managed to unite a fragmented school district in his short time in office. Many are pushing to keep him in office for two more years. In the past, Larry has helped fix a struggling district in Washington where the teachers had just ended a 49 day strike. 

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Unit 2. Calais in crisis - Illegal immigrants reach port with NO border checks as they start targeting cars and caravans to get into Britain

Unit 2. Calais in crisis - Illegal immigrants reach port with NO border checks as they start targeting cars and caravans to get into Britain | APHUG | Scoop.it
Monday : 23/03/2015
Ethan Bernick's insight:

Illegal immigrants have been entering the EU illegally very easily do to no border checks upon entering. Immigrants have been targeting British civilians and hitching rides on unsuspecting cars and trucks. Travelers are advised to not stop within 120 miles of the border. 

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Unit 3. Unprecedented study: Language and Culture Disappear with Western Development and Globalization

Unit 3. Unprecedented study:  Language and Culture Disappear with Western Development and Globalization | APHUG | Scoop.it

   -▶  BIODIVERSITY AND SUSTAINABILITY ARE CLOSELY LINKED TO SURVIVAL OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. An unprecedented study published by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Loss of global biological and cultural diversity paints a dire picture of the state and future of our species. The world’s animal and plant species are disappearing 1,000 times faster than ever in recorded history. Some areas of the world have lost 60 percent of their languages since the mid-1970’s, and 90 percent of the world’s languages are expected to vanish by the year 2099. Life, in general, has suffered horribly from the runaway spread of European values and the notions of progress that began with the Industrial Revolution. A sharp bit of mathematics finally brings forth the maps that expose the poverty of the world’s major carbon emitters and the wealth that remains in those parts of the world where the indigenous are making their final stand....http://newsjunkiepost.com/2012/10/11/biodiversity-and-sustainability-are-closely-linked-to-language-and-culture/

 

 

The Ecologist, March 1-, 2015
-▶ ANTHROPOLOGY IS SO IMPORTANT, ALL CHILDREN SHOULD LEARN IT http://www.theecologist.org/campaigning/2778425/anthropology_is_so_important_all_children_should_learn_it.html

 

                                                    VIDEO

                                 "LANGUAGE MATTERS" 1:49:18

                    Winner of the Grand Festival Award for Documentary

               at the 23rd Annual Berkeley Video and Film Festival 2014

"Language Matters" asks what we lose when languages die and how we can save them. It was filmed around the world: on a remote island off the coast of Australia, where 400 Aboriginal people speak 10 different languages, all at risk; in Wales, where Welsh, once in danger, is today making a comeback; and in Hawaii, where a group of Hawaiian activists is fighting to save the native tongue. http://video.pbs.org/video/2365391566/


                        WEBSITE "Language Matters" with Bob Holman

What do we lose when a language dies? What does it take to save a language? There are over 6000 languages in the whole world. We lose one every two weeks. Hundreds will be lost within the next generation. By the end of this century, half of the world’s languages will have vanished.

                                http://www.languagemattersfilm.com/

 

Science AAAS, September 02, 2014
-▶ LANGUAGES ARE BEING WIPED OUT BY ECONOMIC GROWTH AND GLOBALIZATION http://news.sciencemag.org/brain-behavior/2014/09/languages-are-being-wiped-out-economic-growth

 

Guardian Environment, June 07, 2014
 ▶  AS FORESTS FALL AND SPECIES VANISH, THERE'S ONE OTHER LOSS:  A WORLD OF LANGUAGE: A new report shows a direct link between disappearing habitats and the loss of languages. One in four of the world's 7,000 spoken tongues is now at risk of falling silent for ever as the threat to cultural biodiversity grows http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/08/why-we-are-losing-a-world-of-languages

VIA... Centre for Environmental Change & Human Resilience, University of Dundee http://www.dundee.ac.uk/centres/cechr/

  @CECHR_UoD

 

Embassy of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela in the U.S. , October 14, -▶ 2014 VENEZUELA TO CREATE INSTITUTE FOR INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES. Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro announced Monday the creation of the Institute for Indigenous Languages in order to rescue the culture of native peoples.  http://venezuela-us.org/2014/10/14/venezuela-to-create-institute-for-indigenous-languages/

 

Peak Prosperity, October 12, 2014
▶ RICHARD GOULD: LEARNING FROM ANCIENT HUMAN CULTURES: Were they happier than we are? http://www.peakprosperity.com/podcast/87967/richard-gould-learning-ancient-human-cultures

 

Mongabay, February 11, 2014
▶ HELPING THE AMAZON'S JAGUAR PEOPLE PROTECT THEIR CULTURE AND TRADITIONAL WISDOM. The process of acculturation transformed once proud cultures into fragmented remnants, their self-sufficiency and social cohesion stripped away, left to struggle in a new world marked by poverty and external dependence. ...
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0211-matses-fleck-interview.html

                                                     VIDEO:

                                          Yale Environment 360

                         INTO THE HEART OF ECUADOR'S YASUNI

                           A PENDING CORPORATE OIL PLUNDER

                                           http://sco.lt/6LRpjN

 

Natural News, March 02, 2015
▶ PARAGUAYAN SMALL FARMERS FIGHT BACK AGAINST MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS DESTROYING THEIR LIVES

 http://www.naturalnews.com/048828_GMO_corporations_small_farmers_Paraguay.html#

 

The Ecologist, February 06, 2015
▶ 'CONSERVATION' IS DESTROYING THOSE WHO'VE NURTURED THEIR SURROUNDINGS FOR TIMELESS GENERATIONS

 http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/2741220/wildlife_conservation_must_support_not_destroy_indigenous_peoples.html

 

June 3, 2013 Culture Collapse Disorder

 ▶  WHAT IS CULTURE COLLAPSE DISORDER? ECOPSYCHOPATHY AND THE END OF CULTURE AS WE KNOW IT http://www.culturecollapsedisorder.com/blog/what-is-culture-collapse-disorder-ecopsychopathy-and-the-end-of-culture-as-we-know-it/

 

                                            ENOUGHNESS: 

               WESTERN THOUGHT vs INDIGENOUS PHILOSOPHY

                                       http://sco.lt/4kcNH7

 

-▶ THE VANISHING CULTURES PROJECT: The Vanishing Cultures Project is devoted to assisting indigenous, traditional groups preserve their culture by documenting their lifestyle through photography and research, assisting local preservation initiatives, and educating the public

In this era of rapid change, indigenous communities with rich cultural heritages urgently need the world’s attention. Anthropologists estimate that every two weeks a tribal elder dies with the last remaining knowledge of his or her people’s language, and along with them dies many other living expressions—the crafts, skills, beliefs, lore—of a unique heritage... http://www.vcproject.org

 

Cultural Survival
▶ ECOCIDE OR GENOCIDE? THE ONGE IN THE ANDAMAN ISLANDS http://www.culturalsurvival.org/ourpublications/csq/article/ecocide-or-genocide-the-onge-andaman-islands

 

The Independent, October 13, 2014
 ▶ CAMPAIGN TO PUT ECOCIDE ON A PAR WITH GENOCIDE IN ATTEMPT TO CURB ENVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION

 http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/green-living/campaign-to-put-ecocide-on-a-par-with-genocide-in-attempt-to-curb-environmental-destruction-9789297.html

 

                                                     VIDEO
                                              Global Alliance
            RIGHTS OF NATURE & INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (22:14)

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPP-X02mdcc

 

National Geographic - Special Report:
▶ BIODIVERSITY AND CULTURAL TRADITION http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/02/110223-biodiversity-moorea-biocode/

 

One Green Planet, February 18, 2015
▶ THE SURPRISING EFFECT BEING DISCONNECTED FROM NATURE HAS ON OUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING  http://www.onegreenplanet.org/environment/natural-world-impact-on-human-health-and-well-being/

 

Vox, February 23, 2015
▶ THE US's CENTURY-LONG DESTRUCTION OF NATIVE AMERICAN LAND, IN ONE ANIMATED MAP  http://www.vox.com/2015/2/23/8090157/native-american-theft

 

HuffPost Arts and Culture, February 18, 2015
▶ PHOTOS OF MONGOLIA'S DESERTIFICATION REVEAL SHOCKING EFFECTS OF CHANGING CLIMATE.  To this day, at least 25% of Mongolia's population lives a nomadic life, and in doing so, they remain fiercely dependent on open land for survival. However, due to the fluctuation in climate in recent years, changes to the landscape have rendered this lifestyle difficult, if not impossible, to maintain. Over the course of the past 30 years, approximately a quarter of the country has turned to desert, with around 850 lakes and 2,000 rivers having dried out. If this pattern persists, the Mongolian tradition that's existed for thousands of years will become extinct.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/10/daesung-lee_n_6648868.html

 

International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA), November 2014
Non-Carbon Benefits in REDD+

▶ NON-CARBON BENEFITS ARE CRITICAL FOR INDIGENOUS PEOPLES CONTINUED SURVIVAL AND FUTURE GENERATIONS, as their identities, livelihoods and cultural heritage are historically rooted in their forests that are part of their traditional territories. It is therefore necessary and imperative to ensure the recognition of indigenous peoples’ collective rights to their forest, land and resources as part of the human rights framework in approaches to Non-Carbon Benefits as well as to the overall design and implementation of REDD+. Likewise, incentivizing Non-Carbon Benefits should take into account the historical role of indigenous peoples and, in particular, indigenous women in forest protection and conservation with a view of providing for their needs and priorities for their overall wellbeing. http://www.iwgia.org/publications/search-pubs?publication_id=700

 

                                                           VIDEOS
                           BETWEEN THE FOREST AND THE SEA

                                                     Mongabay

                                                3-PART SERIES

The island-dwelling Guna people of Panama are one of the most sovereign indigenous communities in the world, being endowed with extensive land tenure and self-governance rights. And like many of the world’s traditional cultures, they have a tiny carbon footprint...

                                                        VIDEO

                                     THE YARSUISUIT PART II

Thanks in part to their exceptional sovereignty and land tenure, the Guna have preserved their primary forests for hundreds of years through their cooperative use of the land and their cultural and spiritual traditions rooted in conservation.
http://news.mongabay.com/2014/1031-sri-guerra-yarsuisuit-video.html

 

Washington Post, November 03, 2014
 -▶ GUARDIANS OF LIFE:  THE INDIGENOUS WOMEN FIGHTING OIL EXPLOITATION IN THE AMAZON  http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/in-sight/wp/2014/11/03/3211/indigenous-women-fighting-oil-amazon/

 

Guardian, May 02, 2014
 -▶ NEANDERTHALS AREN'T THE GRUNTING, CLUB-WIELDING IDIOTS - WE ARE http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/02/neanderthals-arent-grunting-club-wielding-idiots-stereotype

 

OpEd News, August 16, 2014
-▶ SHIFTING FROM A PATRIARCHAL TO AN EARTH CENTRIC PARADIGM http://www.opednews.com/articles/Shifting-from-a-Patriarcha-by-Anthony-J-Gerst-Earth-Policy-Institute_Existentialism_Gaia_Paradigm-Shifts-140816-107.html

 

                                                         VIDEO:

                      Intercontinental Cry Magazine, April 19, 2014
                             RESISTING 'THE FOREIGN TENTACLE'
The story of the last of the Kuna people, and their struggle to maintain its culture in a quickly developing country. http://intercontinentalcry.org/resisting-foreign-tentacle/

 

Care2 Causes, July 18, 2014
-▶ 5 REMOTE CULTURES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE http://www.care2.com/causes/5-remote-cultures-from-around-the-globe.html

 

Intercontinental Cry Magazine, June 27, 2014
▶  NICARAGUA'S MAYAGNA PEOPLE AND THEIR RAINFOREST COULD VANISH – More than 30,000 members of the Mayagna indigenous community are in danger of disappearing, along with the rainforest which is their home in Nicaragua, if the state fails to take immediate action to curb the destruction of the Bosawas Biosphere Reserve, the largest forest reserve in Central America and the third-largest in the world.  http://intercontinentalcry.org/nicaraguas-mayagna-people-rainforest-vanish-24439/

 

InterPress Service, September 08, 2014

 -▶ MEXICO'S COCOPAH PEOPLE REFUSE TO DISAPPEAR http://www.ipsnews.net/2014/09/mexicos-cocopah-people-refuse-to-disappear/

 

The Independent, July 2, 2014
 -▶ "LOST" TRIBE RETURNS TO THE RAINFOREST DESPITE THREAT OF VIOLENCE AND INTRODUCED DISEASES. First-world illness and drug traffickers infiltrate an isolated people  http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/lost-tribe-returns-to-the-rainforest-despite-the-threat-of-violence-and-disease-9616935.html

 

                                                    VIDEO

  THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF MOTHER EARTH

                                            http://sco.lt/7e8Zur

 

Mother Nature Network, January 29, 2015
▶ 7 CULTURAL CONCEPTS WE DON'T HAVE IN THE U.S. Perhaps one of these ideas will inspire you to think differently in your day-to-day life http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/blogs/7-cultural-concepts-we-dont-have-in-the-us

 

The Ecologist, January 31, 2015
 ▶ THE WAY OF THE WHITE CLOUD. In search for alternatives to consumerism and industrialism http://www.theecologist.org/green_green_living/2680647/the_way_of_the_white_cloud.html

 

Guardian, December 30, 2014, John Vidal
 ▶  'PEOPLE IN THE WEST LIVE SQUEEZED TOGETHER, FRENZIED AS WASPS IN THE NEST' An indigenous Yanomami leader and shaman from Brazil shares his views on wealth, the environment and politics

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/dec/30/western-living-yanomami-shaman-brazil

 

Earthblog, August 04, 2014
 -▶  NEW SCIENCE SUGGESTS MORE LAND-BASED ECOSYSTEMS LOST THAN BIOSPHERE CAN BEAR An important scientific journal article published today finds that 66% of Earth’s land area must be maintained as natural and agro-ecological ecosystems to sustain a livable environment. Yet about 50% have already been lost, threatening global biosphere collapse  http://www.ecointernet.org/2014/08/04/biosphere_collapse/

 

 

                       THE NEW CORPORATE COLONIALISM.

DESTRUCTION OF PLANETARY LIFE, INDIGENOUS LAND AND LIVELIHOODS IN THE NAME OF "GROWTH"  http://sco.lt/5nT3OT

 

 

▶ BOLIVIA GIVES LEGAL RIGHT TO THE EARTH. Law of Mother Earth sees Bolivia pilot new social and economic model based on protection of and respect for nature. Bolivia is to become the first country in the world to give nature comprehensive legal rights in an effort to halt climate change and the exploitation of the natural world, and to improve quality of life for the Bolivian people. http://sco.lt/9EV0jZ

 

Mongabay, August 11, 2014
 ▶ INDONESIA'S CHILDREN SEE RAVAGED ENVIRONMENT IN THEIR FUTURE. A generation ago, Borneo was one of the wildest places on the planet, a stronghold for species like orangutan, pygmy elephants, Sumatran rhinos, and clouded leopards among tens-of-thousands of other. But decades of logging and oil palm plantations has changed the landscape of Borneo forever: in fact a recent study found that the island has lost 73 percent of its intact lowland forest and 30 percent of its total forest cover since 1973. In the face of this large-scale environmental destruction, a new study in PLOS ONE finds that Indonesian Borneo's children have a pessimistic view of their future, predicting rising temperatures, wildlife declines, and continued destruction of the island's great rainforests. http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0811-hance-kalimantan-children.html

 

Intercontinental Cry Magazine, July 17, 2014

▶  INDIGENOUS MOUNTAIN FARMERS UNITE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND RIGHT TO THEIR OWN SEED http://intercontinentalcry.org/indigenous-mountain-farmers-unite-climate-change-24793/

 

                                                 PHOTOS

Mother Nature Network, January 28, 2014
-▶ MEET THE WOMAN WHO ELEVATED CONSERVATION/INDIGENOUS PHOTOGRAPHY TO A WHOLE NEW LEVEL  http://www.mnn.com/leaderboard/stories/meet-the-woman-who-elevated-conservation-photography-to-a-whole-new-level

 

 

                                   ==========================

 

-▶ THE 2013 FOREST PEOPLES PROGRAMME - ANNUAL REPORT http://www.forestpeoples.org/sites/fpp/files/publication/2014/07/fppannualreport2013-2.pdf

 

                                     ==========================

 

                               ERADICATING ECOCIDE AND GENOCIDE:

                Why Business Leaders Must Step Up To The Challenge

                                               http://sco.lt/7Z03Un

 

BBC News, June 05, 2014
-▶  U.N. URGES ACTION TO PROTECT FORESTS GENETIC DIVERSITY http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-27715552

 

Vanity Fair, December 2013
 -▶  THE AWA INDIANS OF AMAZONIAN BRAZIL:  THE MOST ENDANGERED TRIBE ON EARTH - Photos by  Sebastião Salgado http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2013/12/awa-indians-endangered-amazon-tribe

 

National Post, March 21, 2014
 -▶  AS BURMA OPENS A PRISTINE 'LOST WORLD; OF 800 ISLANDS IN MERGUI ARCHIPELAGO, ENVIRONMENT, INDIGENOUS CULTURES UNDER THREAT  http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/03/21/as-burma-opens-itself-to-the-world-the-pristine-lost-world-of-800-islands-in-the-mergui-archipelago-is-under-threat/

 

                                              VIDEO EXPOSE: 

                                             "STEALING AFRICA" 

                  WHY POVERTY? HOW MUCH PROFIT IS ENOUGH?

                                           http://sco.lt/6DtaqX

 

Guardian Environment, June 29, 2014
▶  PERU NOW HAS A 'LICENSE TO KILL' ENVIRONMENTAL PROTESTERS http://www.theguardian.com/environment/andes-to-the-amazon/2014/jun/29/peru-licence-to-kill-environmental-protestors

 

 Mongabay, May 14, 2014
▶  NEW REPORT REVEALS HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES BY CORPORATIONS, GOVERNMENTS IN THE AMAZON. The report took over six months to complete and gives an in-depth account of the conflicts activists and indigenous peoples (IPs) are having with corporations and governmental agencies. It relays a situation that does not look good.
The report details everything from physical attacks to “systematic pressure” by corporations and governments. According to the report, conflicts over land and territories have reached a ten-year peak in Brazil. In Peru, social conflicts have tripled since 2008, with two-thirds of the reported cases defined as “socioenvironmental” conflicts. http://news.mongabay.com/2014/0514-dulaney-regnskogfondet.html

 

First Peoples Worldwide
▶  NEW STUDY FINDS 94% OF U.S. EXTRACTIVE COMPANIES IGNORE RURAL AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY IMPACTS…INDIGENOUS RIGHTS RISK REPORT  http://firstpeoples.org/wp/new-study-finds-94-of-us-companies-ignore-rural-community-impacts/

 

 

 The Borgen Project, February 13, 2014

-▶ HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN WEST PAPUA NEW GUINEA:  ONE OF THE MOST UNDER-REPORTED EXPLOITATIONS OF INDIGENOUS GROUPS IN THE 21st CENTURY http://borgenproject.org/human-rights-abuses-west-papua/

 

  -▶  WEST PAPUA : 226 THOUSAND HECTARES OF VIRGIN FORESTS TO BE RAZED FOR CORPORATE PALM OIL, DESTROYING ALL LIFE AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES http://sco.lt/67I9ZJ

 

Intercontinental Cry Magazine, May 12, 2014

 ▶  MASS TRIAL OF INDIGENOUS LEADERS SET TO BEGIN THIS WEEK IN PERU http://intercontinentalcry.org/mass-trial-indigenous-leaders-set-begin-week-23042/

 

                                                       VIDEO:

                                                     ETHOPIA

LOCAL TRIBES UNDER THREAT FROM FOREIGN LAND GRAB "INVESTMENTS"  http://sco.lt/7anisL

 

 

                                    =========================

   -▶  WORLD NEWS FROM INTERCONTINENTAL CRY MAGAZINE

 http://intercontinentalcry.org/category/world-news/

                                    =========================

 

 

 ▶  AMAZON RAINFORESTS: DEFORESTATION, MINING RISES AGAIN IN BRAZIL'S AMAZON IMPACTING ECOSYSTEMS, CLIMATE, DEVASTATING INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES http://sco.lt/9FG1Lt

 

-▶ MEGA MINING, FOREIGN LAND GRABS DESTROYING LOCAL COMMUNITIES, ENVIRONMENT AND ECOSYSTEMS http://sco.lt/8nJQf3

 

                                                       VIDEO

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS DESTROYING ECOSYSTEMS, INDIGENOUS LIVELIHOODS, NULLIFYING LAND RIGHTS, CREATING DEPENDENCY AND POVERTY ON A GLOBAL SCALE http://sco.lt/4l725B

 

                                     IN ONE SHORT VIDEO :

            WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PALM OIL ECOCIDE

                                       http://sco.lt/5moIAT

 

 

▶  LAND GRABS:  HOW FOREIGN  "INVESTMENTS" ARE REDISTRIBUTING WEALTH, LAND AND WATER ACROSS THE GLOBE http://sco.lt/5YJpKb

 

  farmlandgrab.org, May 07, 2014
-▶ WHEN OUR LAND IS FREE, WE'RE ALL FREE. Communities are resisting this corporate takeover of their land and they are winning. All over Africa people are sending a clear message to their governments; stop selling Africa to corporations. The Jogbahn Clan in Liberia is one such community and here is their story. http://farmlandgrab.org/post/view/23469

 

Intercontinental Cry Magazine, December 24, 2013
▶ BOLIVIA'S INDIGENOUS FUTURE:  A BALANCE OF PRESERVATION, PROTECTION AND CONNECTION http://intercontinentalcry.org/bolivias-indigenous-future-a-balance-of-preservation-protection-and-connection-21527/

 

-▶ GROSS NATIONAL HAPPINESS:  THE BIG IDEA FROM TINY STATE THAT COULD CHANGE THE WORLD http://sco.lt/67exkX

 

 March 23, 3012 -  The Ecologist

THICH NHAT HANH

-▶  MAYBE IN 100 YEARS THERE WILL BE NO MORE HUMANS ON THE PLANET   http://www.scoop.it/t/environmental-and-human-health/p/1474669518/thich-nhat-hanh-maybe-in-100-years-there-will-be-no-more-humans-on-the-planet-the-ecologist

 

The Atlantic, April 30, 2014
 ▶ THE PERUVIAN WOMAN WHO BREAKS MEGA-DAMS http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/04/the-woman-who-fights-dams/361352/

 

 

                      -▶  DAMS, ECOCIDE AND WATER RIGHTS -▶ 

                                BIG MONEY DRIVES EXTINCTION

             Indigenous Communities, EcoSystems, Forests Devastated

                                      http://sco.lt/79BRmT

 

 

 -▶  SHELL OIL WRECKS NIGERIA'S OGONILAND WITH OIL SPILLS...AND GET'S AWAY WITH IT: http://sco.lt/4vZqvB

 

Reuters: August 29, 2013

  -▶  COLUMBIA DISPLACEMENT: Thousands die and tens of thousands are displaced every year by a conflict that started in the mid-1960s as a Marxist-inspired uprising about inequality, land redistribution and poverty. It has gradually turned into a seemingly interminable war that has disrupted life in rural villages and remote indigenous and Afro-Colombian communities, creating urban slums. http://www.trust.org/spotlight/Colombia-displacement/?tab=background

 

  -▶  THE NOMADIC HERDERS OF MONGOLIA http://www.vcproject.org/projects/mongolia/

 

                                                         WATCH

                                         "REMEMBERING GREEN"

     Award Winning Documentary on Indonesian Deforestation Ecocide

                                                http://sco.lt/6VGYML

 

-▶ A CULTURE SEPARATED FROM NATURE CANNOT SURVIVE:  BANKRUPTING NATURE http://sco.lt/8EqAwD

 

- ▶ WHY CHOOSING NATURE WILL ONLY ADVANCE HUMAN SOCIETIES http://sco.lt/8BIJP7

 

 

 

- ▶ NO TO BIODIVERSITY OFFSETTING:  CONSERVING OUR BIODIVERSITY IS BECOMING DEPENDENT ON IT'S DESTRUCTION http://sco.lt/6ZjXGr

 

 

 -▶  OUR INDUSTRIAL, WESTERN AGRICULTURAL FOOD SYSTEM IS DESTROYING THE EARTH, OUR CULTURES AND OUR HEALTH http://sco.lt/686Qi1

 

▶ KEEPING NATURE IN OUR FUTURE:  HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS ESSENTIAL FOR PLANETARY SURVIVAL  http://sco.lt/99SfhJ

 

 -▶  ECO-SPIRITUALITY: TOWARDS A VALUES-BASED ECONOMIC STRUCTURE http://sco.lt/7tcgQj

 

                                                      WATCH
                  "INSIDE THE GARBAGE OF THE WORLD" (80 min)
We're living on a beautiful planet and as a human race we've been here for thousands of years. Our planet didn't need to be protected; life was flourishing on its own, with its own agenda. However for the past 100 years we've made a tremendous impact with our footprint due to the growth of world population and the industrialization of our everyday life. Economy, profit and capitalization became more important than respecting our planet and an ancient knowledge to advance a new way of life. http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/inside-garbage-world/

 

                                                -- WATCH --

                                                     "HOME" -

                                  An Exquisite Story of Our World

http://thenaturaleye.wordpress.com/2011/03/26/home-an-exquisite-story-of-our-world/

 

                       THE SIXTH MASS EXTINCTION IS UPON US

                                           http://sco.lt/4ywB3h

 

 

                          AN URGENT MEMO TO THE WORLD

                                       The Natural Eye Project

http://thenaturaleye.wordpress.com/2012/07/12/an-urgent-memo-to-the-world/

 

 

 

 


Via pdjmoo
Ethan Bernick's insight:

This scoop explains the rate at which the worlds languages are disappearing and how many languages have been lost. It compares the languages of the world to endangered species, being found in less and less areas. 

more...
pdjmoo's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:31 AM

                                   ----------RESOURCES-------

 

▶FOREST PEOPLES PROGRAMME http://www.forestpeoples.org/

 ▶INTER PRESS SERVICE - INDIGENOUS RIGHTS http://www.ipsnews.net/news/human-rights/indigenous-rights/

 ▶VIA SURVIVAL INTERNATIONAL http://www.survivalinternational.org/news/8626

 ▶LA VIA CAMPESINA - The International Peasants Voice http://viacampesina.org/en/

 ▶INDIGENOUS PEOPLES ISSUES AND RESOURCES  http://indigenouspeoplesissues.com/

 ▶INTERNATIONAL CRY MAGAZINE - Essential News and Film On World's Indigenous People

http://intercontinentalcry.org/

 ▶INDIGENOUS ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK  http://www.ienearth.org/

 ▶CULTURAL SURVIVAL http://www.culturalsurvival.org/

 ▶SCIDEV.NET

Indigenous for global development news & analysis http://www.scidev.net/global/governance/indigenous/

 

 

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:12 PM

In this scoop i noticed many key points including, acculturation, placelessness, loss of language, and groups of indigenous people. We can see the acculturation since through the years languages, animal species and traditions have started disappearing 1000 times faster.Soon 90% of all languages will be gone. This will lead to loss of uniqueness and inevitably placelessness among the world. The reason why languages are being lost is because these indigenous people want  to take the opportunity to get a higher level education and end up leaving their homes. Also they could be out on reserves and are confined to a certain area with many restrictions. If we continue this pattern we will lose the diverse groups in the world. 

Charline's curator insight, August 10, 2015 9:58 AM

                                   ----------RESOURCES-------

 

▶FOREST PEOPLES PROGRAMME http://www.forestpeoples.org/

 ▶INTER PRESS SERVICE - INDIGENOUS RIGHTS http://www.ipsnews.net/news/human-rights/indigenous-rights/

 ▶VIA SURVIVAL INTERNATIONAL http://www.survivalinternational.org/news/8626

 ▶LA VIA CAMPESINA - The International Peasants Voice http://viacampesina.org/en/

 ▶INDIGENOUS PEOPLES ISSUES AND RESOURCES  http://indigenouspeoplesissues.com/

 ▶INTERNATIONAL CRY MAGAZINE - Essential News and Film On World's Indigenous People

http://intercontinentalcry.org/

 ▶INDIGENOUS ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK  http://www.ienearth.org/

 ▶CULTURAL SURVIVAL http://www.culturalsurvival.org/

 ▶SCIDEV.NET

Indigenous for global development news & analysis http://www.scidev.net/global/governance/indigenous/