AllAboutLean.com
6.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Industry 4.0 – What Works, What Doesn't

Industry 4.0 – What Works, What Doesn't | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/industry-4-0-potentials/: Industry 4.0 is (still) all the rage in manufacturing industry. I've already took A Critical Look at Industry 4.0. A lot of Industry 4.0 is hot air with a return on investment only far into the future. However, there are a few ideas that actually may work soon enough. In this post I would like to give my views of what works in Industry 4.0 and what doesn't.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Ship to Line

Ship to Line | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/ship-to-line/: Ship to Line (STL) is yet another technique in lean to optimize your material flow. The idea's gist is that instead of bringing material to the warehouse, you deliver it directly to the line or to the point of consumption. Like a freshly delivered pizza, you don't put it on the shelf and eat it two days later.  However, for Ship to Line  to work, there are a few things to be aware of and to take care of. Let me explain:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Just in Sequence Part 2 – How to Do It

Just in Sequence Part 2 – How to Do It | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/just-in-sequence-how-to/: In this second post on Just in Sequence, I would like to talk about some details on the actual sequencing of parts: when to use Just in Sequence in the first place, which parts to sequence, and how to define the sequence. These are all organizational details to make Just in Sequence  work. In my next and last post of this series, I will describe how to handle problems with parts being out of sequence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Visual Management

Visual Management | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/visual-management/: Yet another hot topic in lean manufacturing is visual management. This can be very helpful in running a shop floor, but when done wrong it can also be quite wasteful and embarrassing. In this post I would like to show you the basic principles of visual management with a few examples. There is more to visual management than merely putting lines on the shop floor. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 3: Lack of Respect

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 3: Lack of Respect | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/employee-motivation-3/: Motivating employees for change is tricky. What often helps is respect, but in reality the opposite is common. While managers claim that of course they respect their people, the employees feel very differently, and quite often there is a lack of respect. In this post I want to talk about this lack of respect and why it happens, before showing how to do it better in the next post.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 1: Carrot and Stick

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 1: Carrot and Stick | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/employee-motivation-1/: All too often, good ideas for a lean implementation fail because workers won't use the new ideas. They simply stick to their old habits. And, no matter how good the ideas are, if they are not used, then the improvement project is a failure. In this post I want to talk about this common problem in industry. The solution is – in theory – easy: Get your people motivated! Doing this in reality, however, is an extremely challenging task with an often-unknown outcome.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Changeover Sequencing – Part 1

Changeover Sequencing – Part 1 | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/changeover-sequencing-part-1/: The sequence of your changeover can have quite an impact on the duration of the changeover. In this series of posts I will show some approaches on how to improve your changeover durations by carefully sequencing the products. This was initially intended to be one post, but as so often happens, it turned out to be more complex than initially thought, and hence I have split it into two posts. The next post will appear next week.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

The Phases of a Changeover

The Phases of a Changeover | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/changeover-phases/: A changeover is changing the set-up of a process from one product to the next. Reducing changeover times is a common and popular way to decrease inventory or to increase available work time (see SMED). Ideally, the changeover time should be zero, allowing true one-piece flow. In reality, however, it is often not zero. This post looks in more detail at the different phases of a changeover to help you understand the process better and to reduce your changeover times.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Where Lean Went Wrong – A Historical Perspective

Where Lean Went Wrong – A Historical Perspective | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/where-lean-went-wrong/: The Toyota Production System is widely considered to be the best production system for any larger company. Achieving similar performance is the vision (or dream?) of many companies. Pretty much all of lean manufacturing is the attempt to copy the approach of Toyota in the hope of a similar stellar performance. Yet most lean transformations fall way short of the goal. In this blog post I would like to give some insights, from a historical perspective, on why lean so often fails.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Material Flow in the Arsenal of Venice 1797

Material Flow in the Arsenal of Venice 1797 | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/material-flow-arsenal-of-venice/: Whenever I am in Venice, I try to visit the Museo Storico Navale, near the entrance to the Arsenal of Venice. This museum has a set of beautiful detailed maps by Abbot Maffioletti showing the Arsenal of Venice in 1797, 1798, and "After Napoleon." You can see in great detail the different steps needed to build and equip a sailing vessel. In this post, I will explain the material flow of the Arsenal of Venice, which was the largest industrial site in Europe and possibly in the world during its time.  Be warned, this post is rich in images. The material flow is partially based on the master thesis of my student Maren-Linn Janka.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Timing of Flow Lines 2 – Continuously Moving Line

Timing of Flow Lines 2 – Continuously Moving Line | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/timing-of-flow-lines-2/: In my last post I described the timing of pulse and unstructured flow lines. Another common way to structure the timing of flow lines is the continuously moving line. In  this type of line, the parts are always moving, and the processes and workers move along with the part until the process is completed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Lean Is Tough – The Phases of a Lean Transformation

Lean Is Tough – The Phases of a Lean Transformation | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/lean-transformation-phases/: Often, consultants sell lean as a quick and easy way  to success that pays for itself. Unfortunately, this is usually not true, as many companies have found out the hard way. Getting lean in a company is similar to getting a lean body; it is usually neither quick nor easy. Let me show you the different phases of a lean transformation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Organize Your Production Sequence – 2: Job Shop

Organize Your Production Sequence – 2: Job Shop | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
Job shops are a manufacturing system where the machines are not arranged in the sequence of the work steps (as in a flow line). Rather, the flow of the part conforms to the arrangement of the machines. This post looks in more detail at the job shop, its advantages and disadvantages, and where it... http://www.allaboutlean.com/job-shop/
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

How to Deal With Long Delivery Times

How to Deal With Long Delivery Times | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/long-delivery-times/: Lean has a bunch of advanced but good tools for material delivery, like Just in Time, Just in Sequence, and Ship to Line. Using them is much easier on short distances and with short delivery times. Yet, sometimes you just don't have the option of short delivery times. This blog post deals with the issues related to long lead times and delivery times.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Just in Sequence Part 3 – What Can Go Wrong

Just in Sequence Part 3 – What Can Go Wrong | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/just-in-sequence-problems/: This third and last post on Just in Sequence details all the things that can go wrong, and talks about how to fix them. The biggest problem is if the sequence of your Just in Sequence part does not match the main component that it should be sequenced to. This happens especially due to defects and
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Different Ways to Establish a Pull System – Part 1

Different Ways to Establish a Pull System – Part 1 | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/different-ways-to-pull-system-1/: Pull production is one of the most important aspects of lean production. Its key feature is to have an upper limit on inventory that is not to be exceeded. The most well-known way to implement a pull system is by using kanban cards. However, there are many others. In this short series of two posts, I want to give you an overview of the different ways to implement pull systems, and discuss the pros and cons of them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 4: Respect for People

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 4: Respect for People | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/employee-motivation-4/: Motivating employees is not easy. In previous posts I described that the carrot and the stick approaches don't work very well. What in my experience works best to improve the system is Respect for People! This is actually a very important aspect of the Toyota Production System, and Toyota puts in lots of effort to show respect to all people. This includes not only employees (the focus of this post), but also customers, suppliers, neighbors, and pretty much everybody else it comes in contact with. At Toyota, it is actually called Respect for Humanity (人間性尊重, ningenseisoncho). Unfortunately, all too often I find this lacking in Western lean implementations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 2: Money

Employee Motivation and Lean Implementation – Part 2: Money | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/employee-motivation-2/: Lean improvements often fail in implementation, meaning the employees do not follow the new standards. In my last post we already saw that pressure ("the stick") doesn't work very well. The second option is the carrot. In this post I will show different "carrots" that are sometimes used to get employees to follow the new standard. However, most of them won't work very well either. What often works best is actually simply treating people with respect – but I will talk about this in my next post.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Changeover Sequencing – Part 2

Changeover Sequencing – Part 2 | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/changeover-sequencing-part-2/: This second post on changeover sequencing looks at the complexity of changeover options, how to optimize the sequence, and how to communicate it reliably to the shop floor planners. (First post here.)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

On Running Changeovers

On Running Changeovers | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/running-changeovers/: Changeover times and their reduction are popular topics in lean manufacturing. In this post I would like to introduce the idea of running changeovers for production lines. The idea behind it is simple, and probably many of you do it already. Nevertheless, I have found little info on it online. I also would like to go into more detail on the benefits of a running changeover in comparison to the alternatives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

What to Do with SMED: Reduce Lot Size or Increase Work Time?

What to Do with SMED: Reduce Lot Size or Increase Work Time? | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/smed-lot-size-or-work-time/: SMED (Single Minute Exchange of Die) is a very useful tool to reduce changeover time. Reducing changeover time will free up time for other uses. Western management often wants to use this time to produce more goods. However, the rule of thumb at Toyota is to use this newly available time to do more changeovers rather than more products. This increase in changeover has the potential to significantly reduce the lot size, which often has much larger benefits than the additional work time. In this blog post I want to look in more detail at this relation between changeover duration, productivity, and lot size.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Strategies for Mass Customization

Strategies for Mass Customization | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/mass-customization/: Mass customization promises us individually customized products at the price of a mass-produced item. We get something that is customized to our needs but doesn't have the luxury price tag usually associated with custom-made products. While challenging, numerous different companies have managed to achieve customization with only marginally higher prices than standard products. In this post I want to look in more detail at how to achieve mass customization.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

The Arsenal of Venice

The Arsenal of Venice | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/arsenal-of-venice/: The Arsenal of Venice was one of the the largest industrial sites in Europe in the 16th century. This was the hub of Venetian ship building, supporting the power of the Venetian republic. Both warships and merchant vessels were built there. It is also known for the organization of its work. Sometimes it is listed as the world's first assembly line, although in my view this may be a bit of a stretch. While they achieved a lot, there was also a lot of chaos. In this post I present you with a bit about the Arsenal in general, as well as some detailed maps by Abbot Maffioletti from 1797 and 1798. In my next post I will go into much more detail on the material flow based on these maps.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Timing of Flow Lines 1 – Unstructured and Pulse Line

Timing of Flow Lines 1 – Unstructured and Pulse Line | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
http://www.allaboutlean.com/timing-of-flow-lines-1/: Flow lines are often the best and most organized approach to establish a value stream. Hence, for flow lines or flow shops you can organize the processes much more easily than for many other types of production systems. In this post I will look at and compare different ways to time your production processes. Please note that this is not line balancing about the work content for each process, but rather different options on when to start the work for each process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Roser
Scoop.it!

Organize Your Production Sequence – 3: Flow Shop

Organize Your Production Sequence – 3: Flow Shop | AllAboutLean.com | Scoop.it
The flow shop is usually preferred for most lean production systems. In a flow shop, the processes are arranged in the sequence of the production steps.  If you can manage to establish a flow shop, your production will be much more efficient than in a job shop or a project shop. In this post I... http://www.allaboutlean.com/flow-shop/
more...
No comment yet.