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How Morocco tapped into Africa's renewable energy potential. #investorseurope #culture

How Morocco tapped into Africa's renewable energy potential. #investorseurope #culture | Africa | Scoop.it
We look to Morocco's success story for lessons on getting clean energy to 600 million people in Africa.

Via AGNES-SENGA TUPPER
8B AlexL's insight:
This article is about providing reliable, affordable and sustainable access to energy in Morocco. Around 1.2 billion people are energy poor. Energy poor means that they do not have access to electricity. More than 2.7 billion people rely on fuel-wood and other traditional biomass sources for cooking. Electricity plays an important role in moving forward with social and economic goals. Areas that lack electricity access often struggle to reach and contact doctors and nurses. Modern energy access also provides important benefits such as public lighting and security. With reliable access to electricity positively can affect education. Morocco went from 71.1 percent electricity access in 2000 to 98 percent access in 2010 and 100 percent access in 2012. In 2015, 34 percent of the country’s energy supply was provided by renewable energy. It may not be possible to scale Morocco’s successes to the continent at large because of financial problems.

This helps me understand Africa because I knew that a lot or most countries in Africa was energy poor, but the fact that Morocco brought 71.1 percent of electricity access to 100 percent was very impressive. I didn't know that renewable energy would impact this much. I think that other countries in Africa should attempt to have solar panels and other renewable energy sources. It might cause an impact. It might not be a big impact or might not even be successful. I still they they should try it.
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AGNES-SENGA TUPPER's curator insight, March 15, 2017 1:21 PM

"Morocco’s experience with solar power offers key lessons for policymakers elsewhere in Africa who are seeking a robust pathway for addressing energy access challenges."

TomT 8A's curator insight, March 23, 2017 9:38 AM
The article, "How Morocco tapped into Africa's renewable energy potential", written by Emmanuel Awofadeju talks about how Morocco has found a way to efficiently supply renewable energy to its citizens and across Africa. Since less than half of the population in Africa have no access to electricity and energy they have to find an easy way to supply the African population with energy. Morocco is placing an investment in their renewable energy source, solar power, in order to supply solar power to the people across the country. Many other countries are also being inspired to try and invest in renewable energy sources to allow their citizens to have access to energy and electricity. Although the location and physical feature of many African countries are different they are trying to come up with ways to introduce renewable energy as a source of energy. 

This article relates to our Science class as we were learning about renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Since we learned about the pros and cons of each, I found it very interesting for Morocco to change to solar energy as it would be very beneficial for them. This change will allow them to prosper and advance technology wise much faster with more people being introduced to electricity and modern technology. This article was especially interesting as it would be nice for Africa to gain more access to energy supplies helping them catch up (technology wise) to more developed countries in Europe and the Americas.
8A RyoS's curator insight, March 24, 2017 1:25 AM
Africa is really rich in energy resources but very poor in energy supply. Even though energy use in Africa has increased by 45 percent between 2000 - 2012, 600 million people in Africa are still energy poor, meaning they don't have access to energy and some even cooks with fuel-wood and other biomass sources. Since Africa has potential because their energy resources are tremendous, UN decides to help Africa establish clean energy such as  hydroelectricity and solar energy.

I feel really sad for people who doesn't have electricity at their homes, I cannot imagine living after the sun sets. I wouldn't be able to do homework or watch TV. I think this important because I think that Africa has the least energy but has the most potential, 30 percent of oil  is imported from Africa. It is important to class because people aren't able to cook or study without electricity, and having electricity will somewhat help Africa have a more stable economic.
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World Bank Paying Ethiopia $68M For Carbon Trading, Green Business Development #Investorseurope #Ethiopia

World Bank Paying Ethiopia $68M For Carbon Trading, Green Business Development #Investorseurope #Ethiopia | Africa | Scoop.it
World Bank paying Ethiopia $68M for carbon trading, green business development. Revenue earned by carbon trading goes to the local community, officials say.

Via Moses O. Ogutu
8B AlexL's insight:
This article is about two World Banks donating $68 million. They aimed at restoring carbon.The Washington, D.C. World Bank said that their goal is to reduce poverty. These must be guided by foreign investment. Environmentally-friendly businesses which includes forest tourism are under the program. One fund is $18 million and is aimed for restoring forests on land. The other is a $50 million fund for a program for carbon. An additional $18 million is focused on developing approaches that enable sustainable land use and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Ethiopia wants to change while gaining financial benefit. Ethiopia’s goal is to become net carbon neutral by 2025. It aims to accomplish this through efforts that include carbon trading. 

This helps me understand Africa because I had an idea of poverty in Ethiopia. I knew that they were very poor. I think that the two World Banks are doing the right thing, trying to reduce Ethiopia's poverty. By 2025 I think that the net carbon can be neutral by 2025.
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Moses O. Ogutu's curator insight, March 17, 2017 8:16 AM

"Two World Bank projects totaling $68 million are scheduled to begin this year in Ethiopia, aimed at restoring forests and sequestering carbon in the much fought-over Oromio region."

8A JessicaL's curator insight, March 24, 2017 6:32 AM
This article is about two world banks totaling $68 million are to be established this year in Ethiopia. The two banks are aiming to restoring forests and remove carbon in the Oromio region. The Washington D.C based World Bank says that its goal is to reduce poverty, but all its decisions must be guided by commitment to promote foreign investment and international trade and facilitate capital investment. Ethiopia's Oromia region constitutes 34.3 percent of the country's landmass, largely in the southwest, and holds more that a third of the country's 100 million residents. It is also know to be Ethiopia's largest concentration of biodiversity. The $69 million Oromia Forested Landscape Program project was established through two world bank funds. One fund is for $18 million and is aimed at the restoration of forests  on degraded land. The other $50 million fund aims at carbon sequestrating assessment and performance enhancement. The program is designed to build on existing landscape protection and the project approaches to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degrading in an effort to finance improved land use across Oromia. The country's current forest is about 1,150 acres. Ethiopia's goal is to become net carbon neutral by 2025. They will do this through efforts that include carbon trading. This would involve the country doubling its forests cover to around 30 percent of its landmass. 

This is related to what we are learning because according to the textbook on page.28, "Hardwood trees grow in all four regions of Africa. People can earn money by cutting down the trees and selling them." This is known as carbon trading. Thousands of trees have been cut in Ethiopia and shipped to other countries for profit. Even though the country is making profit, cutting down trees is bad for the environment because it can lead to extinction of vulnerable species. Deforestation results in larger amounts of greenhouse gases reaching in the atmosphere because trees can not absorb carbon dioxide when they are cut down. This is also related  to Chiang Mai because we are being trapped in pollution. Also, many forests in Chiang Mai are being burned down.
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South Africa plans to fight obesity with a sugar tax

South Africa plans to fight obesity with a sugar tax | Africa | Scoop.it
The South African government has followed in the footsteps of Mexico, France and Hungary to implement a sugar tax to curb the country's obesity epidemic.

Via Enzo Calamo
8B AlexL's insight:
The South African government is planning to implement a sugar tax. The problem reflects the global increase in obesity and overweight rates across developing countries, South Africa plans to have a 20% tax on soft drinks. South Africa has one of the highest rates of obesity in the continent. Over the past 50 years the consumption of soft drinks in Africa increased.They said that sugar tax may work but are still not sure yet. The sugar tax is a plan by South African government to prevent obesity and diabetes over the next five years. 

This helps me understand Africa better because before I read this article I didn't know South Africa had such a big problem with soft drinks. I never thought the government would add sugar tax to prevent obesity and diabetes. I think that the government is doing the right thing. I think that they should try this and see if it works, or this might cause even a bigger problem.
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African migrants died of asphyxia inside shipping container en route to beach | The Libya Observer

African migrants died of asphyxia inside shipping container en route to beach | The Libya Observer | Africa | Scoop.it
A dozen migrants died on Tuesday and others were hospitalized in the city of Al-Khums, 115 km to the east of Tripoli, due to suffocation and crush after being locked inside a shipping container, in a new human tragedy in Libya.

A local source said a human smuggler stuffed a shipping container with more than 50 African migrants in order

Via Luc Van Aken
8B AlexL's insight:
This article is about human smugglers stuffing 50 African migrants in a container. They were being taken to a beach where the sea journey to Europe start. On the way to the beach there was a security check. When the security guards opened the container the African migrants were pushing each other, trying to jump out of the container. Some of the African migrants were found dead due to suffocation. The survivors were taken to the nearest hospital for treatment. 13 migrants were dead and 56 survivors were given special treatments.

This article helps me understand Africa because I have seen a lot of articles about the people from Syria trying to escape the country because of the war. I think that people should stop moving around illegally unless this is the only choice to live. 
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8A LeonardC's curator insight, February 23, 2017 7:33 AM
Dozens of migrants died in a shipping container, suffocated and crushed. They died at Libya. A human smuggler stuffed a shipping container with more than 50 African migrants in order. They were headed for Europe but were stopped midway by security and the security found this tragedy. This is a major problem and connects to our lessons because Migrating is a big problem in Africa. For example, in slavery Africans were exported out of their country against their will. Today Africans are trying to go to other countries to find work however the traveling conditions are still very bad. 
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Fall armyworm 'threatens African farmers' livelihoods' - BBC News

Fall armyworm 'threatens African farmers' livelihoods' - BBC News | Africa | Scoop.it
Scientists say a pest that destroys maize is spreading rapidly across Africa and could reach Asia and the Mediterranean in the next few years.
8B AlexL's insight:

This article is about a fall armyworm destroying crops in parts of Africa. Scientists think that these worms or eggs might have been imported. The farmers told the BBC that these worms were possibly here for a while ,but now the farmers are actually taking lots of damage from it. There is also a possibility that it would reach Asia. These worms are a huge threat to trade in the region. Also they say there are confusion between the fall armyworm and other types of armyworm because they are really similar. These worms are found in Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, etc.

 

This article helps me understand Africa because I know that a lot of people in Africa are farmers. The only way they earn money. While reasearching this article I actually figured out that a lot of people are farmers. This helped me understand what situation Africa is in economically.

 

I think this is a serious problem in Africa right now because if these worms are keep on destroying the crops the farmers won't make any money. Also in the article it mentioned how the fall armyworm might spread to Asia and that will cause even more problems.

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TomT 8A's curator insight, February 9, 2017 8:23 AM

The article, "Fall armyworm threatens African farmers' livelihoods", by BBC new is about a new worm that is rapidly spreading in Africa and eating out most of the vegetation. There are suggestions that this worm, the armyworm, originated in the Americas and was brought to Africa through a crate ship. The armyworm is currently causing a lot of damage and may spread to parts of Europe and Asia. The army worm can turn into an adult moth and fly across the continent causing a rapid spread and may eventually find its way to parts of rural Asia. This helps me understand a big more about when the Africans were having a problem with the tsetse fly killing the cattles. I can start to see how these two are similar as this would lower the vegetation in that area and decades ago there would be less cow and the produce would become much more slower. 

 

I think that this article is really interesting as I would like to see how The Food and Agriculture Organization plan to deal with this issue. On the other hand I feel terrible for the farmers who have to deal with this situation as they would be producing less. This could also be harmful to the consumer as they would have to use more pesticide control and we as humans could be affected by that. I hope that The Food and Agriculture Organization find a way to control the armyworm as soon as possible. 

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How Morocco tapped into Africa's renewable energy potential. #investorseurope #culture

How Morocco tapped into Africa's renewable energy potential. #investorseurope #culture | Africa | Scoop.it
We look to Morocco's success story for lessons on getting clean energy to 600 million people in Africa.

Via AGNES-SENGA TUPPER
8B AlexL's insight:
This article is about providing reliable, affordable and sustainable access to energy in Morocco. Around 1.2 billion people are energy poor. Energy poor means that they do not have access to electricity. More than 2.7 billion people rely on fuel-wood and other traditional biomass sources for cooking. Electricity plays an important role in moving forward with social and economic goals. Areas that lack electricity access often struggle to reach and contact doctors and nurses. Modern energy access also provides important benefits such as public lighting and security. With reliable access to electricity positively can affect education. Morocco went from 71.1 percent electricity access in 2000 to 98 percent access in 2010 and 100 percent access in 2012. In 2015, 34 percent of the country’s energy supply was provided by renewable energy. It may not be possible to scale Morocco’s successes to the continent at large because of financial problems.

This helps me understand Africa because I knew that a lot or most countries in Africa was energy poor, but the fact that Morocco brought 71.1 percent of electricity access to 100 percent was very impressive. I didn't know that renewable energy would impact this much. I think that other countries in Africa should attempt to have solar panels and other renewable energy sources. It might cause an impact. It might not be a big impact or might not even be successful. I still they they should try it.
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AGNES-SENGA TUPPER's curator insight, March 15, 2017 1:21 PM

"Morocco’s experience with solar power offers key lessons for policymakers elsewhere in Africa who are seeking a robust pathway for addressing energy access challenges."

TomT 8A's curator insight, March 23, 2017 9:38 AM
The article, "How Morocco tapped into Africa's renewable energy potential", written by Emmanuel Awofadeju talks about how Morocco has found a way to efficiently supply renewable energy to its citizens and across Africa. Since less than half of the population in Africa have no access to electricity and energy they have to find an easy way to supply the African population with energy. Morocco is placing an investment in their renewable energy source, solar power, in order to supply solar power to the people across the country. Many other countries are also being inspired to try and invest in renewable energy sources to allow their citizens to have access to energy and electricity. Although the location and physical feature of many African countries are different they are trying to come up with ways to introduce renewable energy as a source of energy. 

This article relates to our Science class as we were learning about renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Since we learned about the pros and cons of each, I found it very interesting for Morocco to change to solar energy as it would be very beneficial for them. This change will allow them to prosper and advance technology wise much faster with more people being introduced to electricity and modern technology. This article was especially interesting as it would be nice for Africa to gain more access to energy supplies helping them catch up (technology wise) to more developed countries in Europe and the Americas.
8A RyoS's curator insight, March 24, 2017 1:25 AM
Africa is really rich in energy resources but very poor in energy supply. Even though energy use in Africa has increased by 45 percent between 2000 - 2012, 600 million people in Africa are still energy poor, meaning they don't have access to energy and some even cooks with fuel-wood and other biomass sources. Since Africa has potential because their energy resources are tremendous, UN decides to help Africa establish clean energy such as  hydroelectricity and solar energy.

I feel really sad for people who doesn't have electricity at their homes, I cannot imagine living after the sun sets. I wouldn't be able to do homework or watch TV. I think this important because I think that Africa has the least energy but has the most potential, 30 percent of oil  is imported from Africa. It is important to class because people aren't able to cook or study without electricity, and having electricity will somewhat help Africa have a more stable economic.
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'Good vibration' hand pumps boost Africa's water security

'Good vibration' hand pumps boost Africa's water security | Africa | Scoop.it
The simple up-and-down motion of hand pumps could help scientists secure a key water source for 200 million people in Africa.

Via NERC Press Office
8B AlexL's insight:
        This article is about how the simple up-and-down motion of hand pumps could help secure water source for 200 million people in Africa. Demand for groundwater is putting pressure on the resource while researchers struggle to accurately estimate the future supply. Oxford University says that the pumps can solve the problem. Their study show that the pump can reach great depth of water. It is estimated to be 100 times greater than the annual renewable fresh resource. They discovered that when the water is being drawn from a deep rock, it produces different vibrations than when the liquid comes from a shallow one. 

         This article helps me understand Africa because now have a better understanding of how desperate Africans needed fresh water. I am grateful that there are hand pumps that can help secure water source for 200 million people in Africa. I think that there should be more hand pumps because Oxford University already proved to us that this method works.


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8A TrevorM's curator insight, February 28, 2017 6:05 AM
This article talks about how some African countries are in droughts even though they have many rivers and lakes. It is estimated that there is a hundred times more ground water than there is on the surface in Africa. This has lead to them using pumps and "low-cost mobile sensors" to track how much water a well will produce. In 2012 60 villages in Kenya were given these mobile censors and set them up with pumps. The censors helped them find out if the well was out of water of if there was a problem with it, reducing the repair time for these wells greatly. They have now installed over 300 hundred of these all across Kenya and they help many people have access to water without having to walk all the way to a river.

This relates to what we are doing in class because we have learned about how many African countries are not nearly as developed as western ones, some even lacking easy access to something as basic as water, and this can help solve that. I think that it is very good that people are trying to help others by setting up ways for them to get the basic necessities of life.
8A NoemieP.'s curator insight, March 1, 2017 5:48 AM
This article is about how some low cost mobile sensors attached to a pump can help Africa's water security, for example help record the real depth of the water from the well. This helps me understand that Africa needs a lot of help with their water security. This makes me feel sad for many African people that doesn't have enough water and have to drink and use water that are unclean. Since unclean water can be dangerous for your health because of the bacteria inside of it, it also makes me feel lucky that I have enough clean water to drink everyday and not have to work hard to get water like many people in Africa. 
8B YuminM's curator insight, March 2, 2017 10:31 AM
  The growing demands for groundwater is pressuring our resources, and scientists are trying to find out how much resources we have left for the future. In Africa, many people use pumps in order to get usable water. In 2012, the Oxford research team put on data transmitters on the water pumps, so they were able to get information about the amount of water extracted on a hourly basis. Also, if the pump didn't work, they were able to get to the pump quickly and fix it right away, instead of people having to wait like 3 days until the pump was fixed. Now, these scientists have found out that when the water is being drawn from a deep aquifer, it produces different vibrations than when the liquid comes from a shallow one.
   This can relate to what we are learning because we have learned about how much basic resources African people are lacking and how they're living in such bad conditions. This article is showing one tiny help for the Africans. If a pump suddenly didn't work, they couldn't get water supply from it for about 3 days, but now they are able to get water pretty soon since the pump is fixed in a few hours. I was glad reading this article that there are people out there really trying to help the Africans who are living in such terrible conditions, and I thought that I should really try to think of a way to help them too.
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Trade in African Lion Bones for Asian Market Faces Scrutiny - News of Africa - Online African News - Daily Newspaper - Breaking News

Trade in African Lion Bones for Asian Market Faces Scrutiny - News of Africa - Online African News - Daily Newspaper - Breaking News | Africa | Scoop.it
Wildlife traffickers in a major African park have been offering rewards for a full lion carcass, raising concerns that poachers are increasingly targeting a vulnerable species because of demand in some Asian countries for lion bones used in traditional medicine. The report from Mozambique’s Niassa National Reserve comes amid debate about whether the legal, annual …
8B AlexL's insight:
This article is about the poachers are targeting rare species like lions because some Asian countries demands for lion bones which are used in traditional medicine. From the national reserve debated about if it is legal or not to export bones from hundreds of lions in South Africa to China. These lions also faces other threats , like humans invading the habitats, poachers trying to capture and hunting other animals for food. The number of African lions in the wild has dropped by more than 40 percent. Some people say if we ban on the trade in captive-breed lion bones, the poachers might poach wild animals more. 

This helps me understand Africa because today we read about poachers poaching wild animals in Kenya. From this article I knew this was a serious problem. It says that more than 40 percent of African lions in the wild has dropped. This shocked me.

I think that it should be banned to the trade in captive-breed lion bones. I think they should make the punishments more harsh for poaching so that the poachers would realize they shouldn't do it. I also think that China and other countries should stop demanding for lion bones just for the traditional medicine.I think medicine nowadays are good enough.
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8B Kittyz's curator insight, February 16, 2017 7:50 AM
This article tells us about many animals are in danger in Africa. People are trafficking them to make money. In this article, it explain to us mostly about the endangered lions. People are killing then for their teeth and claws which mainly have trinket value, then migrates to bones and carcasses once a market is established. Sometimes, lion teeth and claws are used as talismans and lion paw bones feature in healers’ divination sets, but some people think it’s because the Chinese needed a lot, not longtime use of lion parts in some traditional cultures in Africa. The number of African lions in the wild has dropped by more than 40 percent to about 20,000 in the past two decades, according to estimates. It surprises me the animal traffickers get $1,500 for a full lion carcass! 
 This is related to what we’ve studying because we have read about the animal trafficking in class and think gives me a deeper understanding about why they does that and why so many people are trafficking animals.
8A JessicaL's curator insight, February 16, 2017 9:03 AM
"Trade in African Lion Bones for Asian Market Faces Scrutiny" is an article about wildlife traffickers in a major African park have been offering rewards for a full lion body, raising concerns that poachers are increasingly targeting vulnerable species because of demand in some Asian countries for lion bones used in traditional medicine. Hundreds of captive-bred lions in South Africa have been exported to China and Southeast Asia. Lions are facing other threats including human trespass on habitats and the poaching of antelopes and other animals for food. The number of African lions has dropped more than 40 percent to about 20,000 in the past two decades.The Niassa wildlife park has at least a third of Mozambique’s population of 2,700 lions. People are paying $1,500 for a full lion body. Last year, Mozambican police seized a haul of rhino horn as well as six kilograms (13 pounds) of lion claws and teeth in suitcases at Maputo International Airport. In January, poachers cut through the fences at an animal park is South Africa and decapitated and chopped off the paws of three male lions. 

This is related to what we have been learning because we recently read an article about fighting wildlife trade in Kenya. The article was about poaching being a global problem and the international demand for ivory and rhino horn which is causing decreasing elephant and rhino populations in Kenya. This article helps me understand Africa because it taught me that people are killing lions for their bones to be used in traditional medicine. People are also paying a lot of money for this which I think isn't beneficial to both humans or lions. African lion bones are a relatively recent substitute for the bones of Asian tigers. These traditional medicines are popular in China. I think the topic discussed in the article is interesting because I once went to a China black market that sold tiger bone wine and tiger bone medicine. Even though tiger trade is illegal in China, people still continue this trade and are even adding other endangered animals to this process.
8B PorjaiP's curator insight, February 23, 2017 10:00 AM
In a major park in Africa, Wildlife Traffickers have been offering rewards for a full lion carcass. This had caused concerns to rise because the amount of poachers targeting vulnerable species in order to make traditional medicine (using lion bones) in some Asian countries, are constantly growing. African lion bones are used as a substitute for Asian tiger bones, whose number were decreased by the poachers. Not only do the lions face the problem of poaching, they are also being threatened by human encroachment and the poaching of other animals for food, which leads the predators to be deprived of prey. According to recent studies, it is shown that the number of African lions living in the wild have decreased by more than 40% to about 20,000 in the past two decades. South Africa's environmental affairs department worries that if they ban the trade of captive-bred lion bones could cause more poaching of wild lions. 

The reason why I chose to do this article is because again, like in my previous article, we are currently learning about poaching in the Africa Unit. This helped me understand Africa better because it tells me how difficult the situation is in Africa. Like for example, if they don't ban it, people will continue to keep doing it, but if they ban it, more people will do it also. This proves how difficult the situation is like in Africa. In my opinion, I think that it is very sad that people are doing this to such innocent and beautiful creatures. I hope that someday they will find a solution to end this poaching problem in Africa.