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Deal provides South African maize farmers with innovative grain storage solution

Deal provides South African maize farmers with innovative grain storage solution | Africa | Scoop.it
Come harvest time, South African maize farmers are set to have their hands full after planting almost a third more hectares thi

Via CIMMYT, Int.
8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about South Africa. When harvest time comes, South African maize farmers are set to have their hands full after planting almost a third more hectares this season. An increase on competitive global market continues to pressure South African producers to find new ways to cut costs on grain and silage storage. One method to use as a storage is the use of massive grain bags on sites around the country. This result in a new deal between South African agriculture specialists Rhino Plastics and Greece’s Plastika Kritis, one of the top global producers of master-batches and agricultural films. According to Brendan Kelly, of Rhino Plastics, the bags are a solution for storing grains such as wheat, barley, maize, sorghum, soybean, rice, rye, and legumes.
This article help me understand more about Africa because it shows me how maize and other crops are important in African's economy. If these crops failed, the economy will probably crash unless they diversify their economy. It's nice to hear that the South Africans' groups are making a deal for the farmers to store their maizes and other crops. If there's no space for the maizes in the facility, there would be a lot of leftovers, and the price might drop down a lot because they need to make space by selling their maizes. 
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The gold Chinese get from donkeys

The gold Chinese get from donkeys | Africa | Scoop.it
Discover why these beasts of burden are the 'new ivory' in the Asian tiger.
8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about people in China wanted donkey's body parts, just like rhinos for their horns and elephants for their ivories. These donkeys are being targeted for the gelatin in their skins. This gelatin are being shipped to China for uses in medicine. It said in this article that donkeys were use to roam free in the nature but now they are force to stay in one place so they will not be kill in the nature. It is also mention that donkeys population had decrease from 11 million to 6 million since 1990. Police said that if nothing is done to protect donkeys in Africa, it might end up just like rhinos and elephants and they need to be protect carefully,
This is related to us because in class, Miss Abby didn't believed that there are donkey poaching. This is also related to our topics because we learnt about poaching and how it badly decrease the population of an animal. I feel bad when I read this article because donkeys are amazing animal and it should be protected, not sold to China for gelatin in their skins.
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Subsistence mosaics, forager-farmer interactions, and the transition to food production in eastern Africa

Subsistence mosaics, forager-farmer interactions, and the transition to food production in eastern Africa | Africa | Scoop.it
The spread of agriculture across sub-Saharan Africa has long been attributed to the large-scale migration of Bantu-speaking groups out of their west Central African homeland from about 4000 years ago. These groups are seen as having expanded rapidly across the sub-continent, carrying an ‘Iron Age’ package of farming, metal-working, and pottery, and largely replacing pre-existing hunter-gatherers along the way. While elements of the ‘traditional’ Bantu model have been deconstructed in recent years, one of the main constraints on developing a more nuanced understanding of the local processes involved in the spread of farming has been the lack of detailed archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological sequences, particularly from key regions such as eastern Africa. Situated at a crossroads between continental Africa and the Indian Ocean, eastern Africa was not only a major corridor on one of the proposed Bantu routes to southern Africa, but also the recipient of several migrations of pastoral groups from the north. In addition, eastern Africa saw the introduction of a range of domesticates from India, Southeast Asia, and other areas of the Indian Ocean sphere through long-distance maritime connections. The possibility that some Asian crops, such as the vegecultural ‘tropical trio’ (banana, taro, and yam), arrived before the Bantu expansion has in particular raised many questions about the role of eastern Africa's nonagricultural communities in the adoption and subsequent diffusion of crops across the continent. Drawing on new botanical and faunal evidence from recent excavations at a range of hunter-gatherer and early farming sites on eastern Africa's coast and offshore islands, and with comparison to inland sites, this paper will examine the timing and tempo of the agricultural transition, the nature of forager-farmerpastoralist interactions, and the varying roles that elements of the ‘Bantu package’, pastoralism, and nonAfrican domesticates played in local economies. This paper highlights the complex pathways and transitions that unfolded, as well as how eastern Africa links into a broader global picture of heterogeneous, dynamic, and extended transformations from forager to farmer that challenge our fundamental understanding of pre-modern Holocene societies

Via Dorian Q Fuller, Eve Emshwiller
8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about the spread of argiculture in Africa. The spread of agriculture across sub-Saharan Africa was cause by the large-scale migration of Bantu-speaking groups out of their homeland in west Central Africa about 4,000 years ago, this is called the Bantu expansion. The Bantus explaned rapidly across the sub-continent, carrying packages for farming, metal-working, and potter, and largely replacing pre-exxisting hunter-gatheres along the way. While the elements of the Bantu model have been analyzed in recent years, one of the main problem the limit the developing a better understanding of the spread of farming. Situated at a corssroads between continental Africa and the Indian Ocean, eastern Africa was not only a major corridor on of the proposed Bantu routes to southern Africa, it was also a recipient of several migrations of groups of farmer from the north.
This article help me understand about Africa by telling me about the Bantu expansion that caused a large group of farmers to migrate from West Africa to southern Africa. This also help me understand African was advanced because 4,000 years ago, they had stuff for farming, metal-working, and pottery. I think that this topic is still a mystery because know one exactly know what caused the Bantu to migrate to souther Africa.  
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Poachers kill an elephant illegally every 25 minutes

Poachers kill an elephant illegally every 25 minutes | Africa | Scoop.it

An elephant is being illegally killed every 25 minutes in Africa’s poaching crisis, conservationists have warned as they called for an urgent end to the UK’s domestic ivory market.


Via Wildlife Defence
8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about 1 elephant is being illegally killed every 25 minutes in Africa's poaching crisis. The poaching of African elephants become a target for poaching because of their ivories. Some of the ivories shipment are destined for Asia. The UK government has pledged to make the current ivory trade laws tighter, the WWF want the trading with ivories be completely ban.

This is related to what we have learned because it's about ivoris poaching that we studied last week. I feel bad from reading this story because elephants are being killed for their ivories which is bad. 
8B Kittyz's curator insight, February 23, 2017 6:15 AM
This article tell us about the poaching of elephant in Africa. An elephant is being killed every 25 minutes by the poachers. The poaching of African elephants is driven by global demand for ivory, and the UK’s legal market is being used as a cover for illegal trade. African elephants have seen numbers tumble by more than one hundred thousand in the last decade as a result of a surge in poaching to supply the illegal global trade in ivory meeting demand in countries such as China, Thailand and Vietnam. Action has been taken in recent months to clamp down on ivory, with China – home to the world’s biggest legal and illegal markets – announcing it will ban domestic trade by the end of 2017. The US has introduced a near-total ban and Hong Kong has committed to closing its domestic market. In UK people are calling for the UK’s domestic market to be shut down. Maria Mossman, of Action for Elephants, she said: “The UK government must do what it has been promising for seven years and bring an end once and for all to this shameful trade.” 

 This is related to what we’ve been studying because we're talking and studying about wildlife poaching in Africa. I was really shocked that the poaching amount of elephants were so high, but I’m glad many countries are shutting down markets and quitting the trade.

8B HongB's curator insight, March 2, 2017 10:05 AM
       This article talks about how every 25 minutes an elephant is illegally killed due to Africa’s poaching crisis. The global demand for ivory drives the poaching of the African elephants, with the United Kingdom’s legal market being used to cover the illegal trade heading towards countries in Asia. Due to this, the United Kingdom government has promised to stiffen and make the current ivory trade laws more strict. However, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) wants to set an example for other countries by being more stiff with the ban on the trade of both antique ivory and modern ivory items. Under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, the commercial international trades in the ivory of African elephants is prohibited. However, even so, the population of the African elephants has decreased by more than 100,000 in the last decade. Many countries including China, the United States, and Hong Kong, have decided to take action by banning or closing the domestic market in their country. Conservationists believe that it is necessary for the United Kingdom to “stand for elephants, continue to demonstrate global leadership and implement a ban without delay “ and do what they have been promising for seven years to bring an end to this trade.
       This article gave me a better understand of the problem of the poaching of African elephants. We learned a little about poaching in Social Studies, though I never thought about the more complex system behind the trade which may include legal markets covering up the illegal trade. The poaching of African elephant doesn’t only involve countries in Asia, it involves countries in other areas of the world too. The United Kingdom’s legal market being used to cover the illegal trade heading towards countries in Asia. The trade is a whole system and the population of African elephants is decreasing a lot. Therefore, the WWF want the United Kingdom to set an example for other countries by being more stiff with the ban on the trade of both antique ivory and modern ivory items. After reading this article I had a mix of emotions. I felt sad and sort of mad at the same time that people are willing to kill innocent animals for just their ivory, without even thinking of the effect they have on Africa and its ecosystems. However, I feel happy that many countries notice this crisis and are banning the domestic market in their country.I hope that the banning will be successful and the numbers of elephant poaching decrease.
8B EmilyL's curator insight, March 24, 2017 10:10 AM
       This article is about in Africa, every 25 minutes an elephant is being illegally killed in Africa’s poaching crisis, conservationists have warned as they called for an urgent end to the UK’s domestic ivory market. Therefore the UK government must do what it has been promising for seven years and bring an end once and for all to this shameful trade. 

       This article help me understand that Africa have a lot of poaching going on, and most of them are for their own good. I think the topic discussed in the article is very sad and important, because I like elephants, and other animals. Even if they don't have human rights, they shouldn’t be killed like this just because selfish people
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Africa beckons Gujarat farmers, offers 90,000 hectares land on long-term lease

Africa beckons Gujarat farmers, offers 90,000 hectares land on long-term lease | Africa | Scoop.it

Farmers from Gujarat have a bright chance to explore money-spinning farming opportunities being offered by African countries.

Ahead of the five-day international trade show to be held in Rajkot, several participating African countries have already made an offer of 90,000 hectares land on a longterm lease to agriculturists from Gujarat.

As many as 500 delegates, including ministerial groups, from 30 African nations are expected to participate in the trade show beginning February 11 organized by the Saurashtra Vepar Udhyog Mahamandal (SVUM), the apex body of industries of Saurashtra and Kutch.


Via In-Gujarat.Info
8A ArnonPs insight:

This article is about farmers from Gujarat that could possibly have a chance to explore money-spinning farming opportunities. There will be five-day international trade held in Rajkot, several African countries have already made an offer of 90,000 hectares land on a longterm lease to farmers in Gujarat. The Africans countries that made the offer are Sudan, Togo, Mali, Botswana, Congo, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Tanzania and Gabon. They offered farmers from Gujarat to work at their countries.


This article helps me understand Africa because African is a continent that has farming as their main source of income. The African countries are also recruiting for more farmers to plant their crops so this is a good chance to find farmers. I think that the topic discussed in this article is good because farmers from Gujarat can get a job in Africa which is good for both sides, Africans and Indian from Gujarat.

8A RyoS's curator insight, February 9, 2017 8:50 PM
This article is about farmers receiving business opportunity from African countries. This helps me understand Africa more because they are developing countries and requires resource, land, food to keep the country growing. Lending out 90,000 hectares of land can be a huge opportunity for growing food, cash crops. I can also see that Africa is willing to take a huge step in order for their country to move forward. I think that it's nice to give farmers business opportunity, it is something I don't see everyday.  In a job as unrewarding as farming, I am happy to see that people are being even rewarded a little is abit heartwarming.
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Poachers kill one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephants

Poachers kill one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephants | Africa | Scoop.it
Satao II, about 50 years old, is believed to have been shot with a poisoned arrow in Tsavo national park, Kenya

Via Wildlife Defence
8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about one of Africa's oldest and largest elephants has been killed by poachers in Kenya, according to a conservation group that protected a dwindling group of "big tuskers" estimated that there are about 25 "big tuskers" left. The elephant that was killed is called Satao II, about 50 years old, was found dead on Monday and was believed to have been shot by poisoned arrow. The killing shows no sign of abating, with approximately 30,000 elephants slaughtered for their ivory every year, mainly to satisfy demand in the Asian market for products coveted as a traditional medicine or as status symbols.
This article helps me understand more about Africa because poaching is a major problems for African's animals. Elephants are important animal for Africans because they are symbols for some African countries. I think that this topic is very sad because an elephant was killed because of poachers in Kenya, additionally, the elephant is also a big tusker which make this topic worse.
TomT 8A's curator insight, March 15, 2017 12:44 AM
The article, "Poachers kill one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephant," reported by 'TheGuardian' tells about the loss of one of the endangered elephants. The elephant was named Satao and is a 50 year-old elephant. In Kenya a poacher has recently killed one of the endangered 'big tusker' , Satao, causing the Kenya wildlife Service to become more aware. It was said that Satao was killed by a poison arrow. Luckily, not longer after this tragedy happened, the culprits were caught. It is said that about 30,000 elephants are killed each year for their ivory annually. After this incident the organizations that are in charge of protecting the elephants from poachers have started to take more actions to prevent future misfortune such as this.

This article relates to our Social Studies class as we had studied about poaching in Africa before and its consequences. After reading this article, it helped further my knowledge about poaching and African wildlife. I think that the poaching of elephant for ivory is terrible and it should not be done as it is killing animals that are endangered just for ivory. This article was interesting because it created a question in my head: Even if people know the consequences of killing endangered animals for ivory. Why do they still do it? I hope that poaching could be completely stopped, but I also appreciate the effort that the organizations are putting in to lessen the poaching of ivory.
8A JonathanS's curator insight, March 17, 2017 11:18 AM
This article is about how poachers recently have killed one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephants. "Satao II, about 50 years old, is believed to have been shot with a poisoned arrow in Tsavo national park, Kenya." One of the oldest and largest elephants has been killed by poachers and according to a conservation group that protects a dwindling group of “big tuskers” estimated to be as few as 25. The elephant was found dead and was believed to have been shot with a poisoned arrow. Two poachers believed to be responsible for the killing and were apprehended not long after his carcass was spotted in routine aerial reconnaissance of the Tsavo national park. These 'big tuskers' really are magnificent mammals. About 15 of them were believed to have tusks long enough to scrape the ground. One of Satao II’s tusks weighed 51.5kg and the other 50.5kg. The number of African elephants has fallen by about 111,000 to 415,000 over the past decade. Approximately 30,000 elephants are being killed for their ivory every year, mainly to satisfy demand in the Asian market for products coveted as a traditional medicine or as status symbols. The Tsavo covers about 16,000 sq miles (42,000 sq km) and is a major challenge for rangers to patrol.

I think this is a huge problem and I know that people are trying to do their best to protect these elephants but there are just to many greedy poachers that are always one step ahead. I think that killing animals that are basically endangered already just to gain money of it is such a stupid and greedy thing to do and I cant believe these people don't feel any regret or emotion for doing this and just keep on going instead. As I've said I fell really bad for these animals and I think that between these soulless people there are people with guts that actually try to do things for these animals to keep them safe and protected. This article is connected to what we've leaned in class about poaching and what problems are caused by these people's behavior. I think this was an interesting article that of course delivered very sad news and I think that people are doing their best to protect these animals and that there's not a lot more that they can do but that what they're doing now is good but sadly still not good enough.
8A AndrewS's curator insight, March 23, 2017 10:22 PM
Poachers kill one of the African last remaining, elephants. One of the African oldest and largest elephants has been killed by poachers in Kenya. They were able to find the carcass before the poaches could recover the ivory. About 30,000 elephants are killed for their ivory each each year. The number of African elephants has fallen by about 111,000 to 415,000 over the past decade. This shows that a lot of African elephants are dying and that we should not be supporting the people who kills the elephants. An elephant named Satao II, about 50 years old was killed for it tusks. Satao’s tusks weighed 51.5kg and 50.5kg. The Tsavo Trust helps monitor the elephants through aerial and ground reconnaissance. I can relate this to my science class because we are in the age of extinction. It is believed that we are in the biggest mass extinction ever to exist and this is all happening because of human. We are the one who kills these animals. We should stop before it’ll be too late. We are doing this for ourself. So many animals have become extinct because of us. We need to starting thinking about other animals and we should stop killing animals such as elephants.
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Deal provides South African maize farmers with innovative grain storage solution

Deal provides South African maize farmers with innovative grain storage solution | Africa | Scoop.it
Come harvest time, South African maize farmers are set to have their hands full after planting almost a third more hectares thi

Via CIMMYT, Int.
8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about South Africa. When harvest time comes, South African maize farmers are set to have their hands full after planting almost a third more hectares this season. An increase on competitive global market continues to pressure South African producers to find new ways to cut costs on grain and silage storage. One method to use as a storage is the use of massive grain bags on sites around the country. This result in a new deal between South African agriculture specialists Rhino Plastics and Greece’s Plastika Kritis, one of the top global producers of master-batches and agricultural films. According to Brendan Kelly, of Rhino Plastics, the bags are a solution for storing grains such as wheat, barley, maize, sorghum, soybean, rice, rye, and legumes.
This article help me understand more about Africa because it shows me how maize and other crops are important in African's economy. If these crops failed, the economy will probably crash unless they diversify their economy. It's nice to hear that the South Africans' groups are making a deal for the farmers to store their maizes and other crops. If there's no space for the maizes in the facility, there would be a lot of leftovers, and the price might drop down a lot because they need to make space by selling their maizes. 
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South African Olive Farmers Feel the Heat as Wildfires Take Their Toll

South African Olive Farmers Feel the Heat as Wildfires Take Their Toll | Africa | Scoop.it
The Western Cape is home to over more than 90 percent of the estimated 1.6 million olive trees in South Africa, with many of the country’s 140 producers setting up shop in the region to taking advantage of the area’s Mediterranean climate of cold and wet winters and hot, dry summers.

8A ArnonPs insight:
This article is about the olive farms in Western Cape, South Africa which wildfires are buring down the trees. 90% of olive trees in Southern Africa are found in the Western Cape. The wildfires are also burning down those olive trees.
This article helps me understand Africa because in Africa, they planted a lot of crops, not just maize and tobacco, they also plant olives. There are also wildfires in Africa which would cause a lot of money to fix what heppen after the fire. I think this is a sad topic because of the lost African farmers need to face, their crops are buring down and that would effect the economy also.
8B DavidO's curator insight, February 16, 2017 7:40 AM
This article is about Palm Oil in Africa. It showed how much of the world's palm oil came from Africa. About 49.3% of all palm oil is made in Africa. And a huge amount of Palm Oil got set on fire putting tons of smoke in the sky. I think that it relates to what we are studying because we are talking about the problems of water shortages and this happened because there was a three year drought and almost no water around to put out the fire.
8A LeonardC's curator insight, February 16, 2017 9:11 AM
The article talks about how since the climate is getting hotter, the water in the dams are going to be finished in about a few months. Most of the water is used to irrigate the land which will cause a lot of problems if a drought hits. Fires are a big problem during a hot season. The olive oil industry in Africa will be affected by even a single company not producing. The article makes me understand that in Africa, every single drought or bad climate change can result into a major drawback to the people. This is because in the article it shows how a little fire can destroy lost of animals and trees. This is a major problem and more anti fire support should be given in Africa and fire protection to the farms. I feel bad for the people who lost their jobs and land from the fire.