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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Africa | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."

8A JonathanS's insight:

https://geographyeducation.org/courses/regional-geography-geog-400/modern-slavery/

 

This article describes when people in Africa are victims of modern day slavery. It tells us how people are forced into working long long hours a day with no breaks, barely any food or water and a very unsafe working environment. Some examples of what these poor people are forced into working as are laborers, prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides. Many people are also forced into marriages and illegal mining and smuggling of goods across borders . There are currently about 30 million modern day slaves all over the world. Their mostly in large parts of Africa and most of India. There's also some in Europe and in the U.S. One of the most unsafe working environment these slaves are forced into working in are the illegal mining projects. Their forced to work long hours in a mine that could collapse any second with nothing but a cheap flashlight tied to their head and a shovel or spade. 

 

I think this article connects to what were working on in class about modern slavery and Africa. I think this is very sad because I think everybody has the right to do what they feel like and deserve their freedom just like most people. This is extremely unfair and I think that more people should try and do something about it. Of course there are already loads of people trying to prevent this issue from spreading and I think it's a very kind and respectful thing to do. I did learn a lot from this article tho and the TED talk. One thing I learned was that this problem mostly appears in Africa. I honestly though that Asia and more parts of South America would have this issue as well. So yes, I learned quite a lot from this and I think that it was a good article with lots of useful information and I got a lot of emotional feelings from seeing the video.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .

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'Glencore sells two Africa zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali' @investorseurope #mining 

'Glencore sells two Africa zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali' @investorseurope #mining  | Africa | Scoop.it
The $400 million-deal will make of Trevali the first pure zinc company with operations in North and South America as well as Africa.

Via Igor Espanhol
8A JonathanS's insight:
This article is about how mining and commodities trader Glencore is selling its stakes in two zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali in a deal worth about $400 million that will make the later the first pure zinc company with operations in North and South America as well as Africa.With this sale, Glencore gives Trevali its 80% and 90% stakes respectively in the Namibia-based Rosh Pinah and the Perkoa mine located in Burkina Faso, while it also increases its direct holding in the Vancouver-based miner from 4% to 25%, getting two seats on the Trevali’s board. This also opens the door for the creation of a “multi-asset, low-cost global zinc producer,” whose output will double to approximately 410 million pounds per year, placing the company among the world’s top 10 zinc producers. Rosh Pinah opened in 1969 and is expected to have a further 14 years of operating life, while Perkoa is set to produce for another six years. Trevali, which already has operations in Canada and Peru, said the transaction is subject to regulatory approvals and is expected to close by July.

I think this wasn't really an interesting article but I surely learned a lot from it. It was quite fun to hear about all the improvements made to these mining companies and how successful they became. I think this connects to what we've learned in social studies because of all the illegal and unsafe mining going on. So it's nice to hear that some of these mining companies actually compromised and came up with a goof and fair solution and how all mining in Africa doesn't have to end with conflicts and wars. It's also nice to hear that these mines are actually well taken care of and that they are in safe conditions and that it;s all well sorted out.
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Igor Espanhol's curator insight, March 15, 2017 9:47 AM

"Mining and commodities trader Glencore (LON:GLEN) is selling its stakes in two zinc mines to Canada’s Trevali (TSX:TV) in a deal worth about $400 million that will make the later the first pure zinc company with operations in North and South America as well as Africa."

8A BenB's curator insight, March 17, 2017 9:43 AM
This article was about the sale of stakes of two zinc mines. The company known as Glencore, a mining company in Burkina Faso, Africa. They sold the mines to a mining company called Trevali Mining Corporation. The Trevali Mining Corporation is a mining company that digs up over 3,000 tons of zinc a day. The company however works in places like South America and Africa but was actually founded in Vancouver, British Columbia. (The town right next to where I was born) They intend on using the zinc for types of medicine with treating wounds. Zinc is also needed for human health and some people living with a deficiency of it prevents things in children like diarrhea and stunted growth. This helps us to connect and understand Africa by giving a more insight on how Africa's connection to other countries and allies are helping(?) the rest of the world. In class we also learned about how other African countries had relied heavily on mining. For example South Africa is the world leader of gold and diamonds. In conclusion this article was pretty cool. It made it interesting to hear about since I have a kind of connection with this article.
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Protecting South Africa's macadamia nut crop - BBC News

Protecting South Africa's macadamia nut crop - BBC News | Africa | Scoop.it

Macadamia nut farming is increasingly popular across the developing world and especially in Africa. Kenya and Malawi have sizeable plantations of the valuable nut and South Africa was the world's largest producer in 2015. But the 2016 crop may be much lower because of the drought that continues to grip much of southern Africa.

8A JonathanS's insight:
This article and short movie clip is talking about how drought is effecting macadamia nut farming in Kenya, Malawi and South Africa. South Africa was the worlds largest producer in 2015. But the 2016 crop may be much lower because of the drought that continues to grip much of southern Africa. Some analysts say that demand for the nut from China and the US remains strong, which will mean prices will rise. But others say the fall in production threatens jobs. The documentary is about this guy starting a macadamia nut farm and factory and how his success has increased and increased over the past few years, but now his whole company is begging on their knees cause more and more people are ordering macadamia nuts and their running out.

I think this connects a lot to what we've been reading about in the text book with farming problems and how the heating up of our world damages it a lot. This was an interesting article but it sucks that people may be loosing their jobs because of whats happening to the world. I really think we should be doing some big changes about this and try to fight global warming the best we can.
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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    

8A JonathanS's insight:
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
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Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:13 PM

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

Ping Ping W's curator insight, February 15, 2018 11:33 PM

“Although slavery is no longer legal, there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa…”  Even though cocoa drinks are very delicious, have you ever stop to consider where how and who collected them? Here’s how they do it: slavery. It is still very common on cocoa plantations in West Africa. Children are smuggled from all over Africa (Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso, etc), then, they are placed on remote, isolated plantations. Also, thirty-five percent of world’s chocolate is produced by slave labour.

 

This helped me better understand Africa by informing me about how children were kidnapped and force to work...some children work at such a young age too. Before doing this research, I didn’t know how Cocoa even came to be! However, now that I know that children slavery was how cocoa was produced, it made me wonder if the factory knew? All the factory that bought their cocoa from Africa, do they know this is how they’re getting their products? And if they do, why don’t they do anything to stop children slavery or pay the workers at least? I think that cocoa factories in Africa must have really low budgets, or else they wouldn’t be kidnapping kids or adults to do the work in the form of modern slavery (without paying them too). 

K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s curator insight, June 23, 2018 11:32 AM

The youth are not the only ones that have history and could improve or do things better or just in different way but the older generation also have our cross to bare. As this article i must admit put the fact that not everything that is seen as good come from good reasonings as chacolate is not seen as sinful when we purchase it from the store but to know that atleast some of it got its original origin from thd blood sweat and tears of others thru and by the means of slavery. Just because a thing is not counted as a sin in the eyesight of man it does not make it right to God. Just because slavery is no longer legal does not make it not done and even to the point we can become enslaved in the mindset.  Which is more crippling than the chains of bondage by being physically enslaved by others. 

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Poachers kill one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephants

Poachers kill one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephants | Africa | Scoop.it
Satao II, about 50 years old, is believed to have been shot with a poisoned arrow in Tsavo national park, Kenya

Via Wildlife Defence
8A JonathanS's insight:
This article is about how poachers recently have killed one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephants. "Satao II, about 50 years old, is believed to have been shot with a poisoned arrow in Tsavo national park, Kenya." One of the oldest and largest elephants has been killed by poachers and according to a conservation group that protects a dwindling group of “big tuskers” estimated to be as few as 25. The elephant was found dead and was believed to have been shot with a poisoned arrow. Two poachers believed to be responsible for the killing and were apprehended not long after his carcass was spotted in routine aerial reconnaissance of the Tsavo national park. These 'big tuskers' really are magnificent mammals. About 15 of them were believed to have tusks long enough to scrape the ground. One of Satao II’s tusks weighed 51.5kg and the other 50.5kg. The number of African elephants has fallen by about 111,000 to 415,000 over the past decade. Approximately 30,000 elephants are being killed for their ivory every year, mainly to satisfy demand in the Asian market for products coveted as a traditional medicine or as status symbols. The Tsavo covers about 16,000 sq miles (42,000 sq km) and is a major challenge for rangers to patrol.

I think this is a huge problem and I know that people are trying to do their best to protect these elephants but there are just to many greedy poachers that are always one step ahead. I think that killing animals that are basically endangered already just to gain money of it is such a stupid and greedy thing to do and I cant believe these people don't feel any regret or emotion for doing this and just keep on going instead. As I've said I fell really bad for these animals and I think that between these soulless people there are people with guts that actually try to do things for these animals to keep them safe and protected. This article is connected to what we've leaned in class about poaching and what problems are caused by these people's behavior. I think this was an interesting article that of course delivered very sad news and I think that people are doing their best to protect these animals and that there's not a lot more that they can do but that what they're doing now is good but sadly still not good enough.
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TomT 8A's curator insight, March 15, 2017 12:44 AM
The article, "Poachers kill one of Africa's last remaining 'big tusker' elephant," reported by 'TheGuardian' tells about the loss of one of the endangered elephants. The elephant was named Satao and is a 50 year-old elephant. In Kenya a poacher has recently killed one of the endangered 'big tusker' , Satao, causing the Kenya wildlife Service to become more aware. It was said that Satao was killed by a poison arrow. Luckily, not longer after this tragedy happened, the culprits were caught. It is said that about 30,000 elephants are killed each year for their ivory annually. After this incident the organizations that are in charge of protecting the elephants from poachers have started to take more actions to prevent future misfortune such as this.

This article relates to our Social Studies class as we had studied about poaching in Africa before and its consequences. After reading this article, it helped further my knowledge about poaching and African wildlife. I think that the poaching of elephant for ivory is terrible and it should not be done as it is killing animals that are endangered just for ivory. This article was interesting because it created a question in my head: Even if people know the consequences of killing endangered animals for ivory. Why do they still do it? I hope that poaching could be completely stopped, but I also appreciate the effort that the organizations are putting in to lessen the poaching of ivory.
8A ArnonP's curator insight, March 17, 2017 10:00 AM
This article is about one of Africa's oldest and largest elephants has been killed by poachers in Kenya, according to a conservation group that protected a dwindling group of "big tuskers" estimated that there are about 25 "big tuskers" left. The elephant that was killed is called Satao II, about 50 years old, was found dead on Monday and was believed to have been shot by poisoned arrow. The killing shows no sign of abating, with approximately 30,000 elephants slaughtered for their ivory every year, mainly to satisfy demand in the Asian market for products coveted as a traditional medicine or as status symbols.
This article helps me understand more about Africa because poaching is a major problems for African's animals. Elephants are important animal for Africans because they are symbols for some African countries. I think that this topic is very sad because an elephant was killed because of poachers in Kenya, additionally, the elephant is also a big tusker which make this topic worse.
8A AndrewS's curator insight, March 23, 2017 10:22 PM
Poachers kill one of the African last remaining, elephants. One of the African oldest and largest elephants has been killed by poachers in Kenya. They were able to find the carcass before the poaches could recover the ivory. About 30,000 elephants are killed for their ivory each each year. The number of African elephants has fallen by about 111,000 to 415,000 over the past decade. This shows that a lot of African elephants are dying and that we should not be supporting the people who kills the elephants. An elephant named Satao II, about 50 years old was killed for it tusks. Satao’s tusks weighed 51.5kg and 50.5kg. The Tsavo Trust helps monitor the elephants through aerial and ground reconnaissance. I can relate this to my science class because we are in the age of extinction. It is believed that we are in the biggest mass extinction ever to exist and this is all happening because of human. We are the one who kills these animals. We should stop before it’ll be too late. We are doing this for ourself. So many animals have become extinct because of us. We need to starting thinking about other animals and we should stop killing animals such as elephants.
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Rhinos Airlifted to Safety in South Africa (PHOTOS) - Ecorazzi

Rhinos Airlifted to Safety in South Africa (PHOTOS) - Ecorazzi | Africa | Scoop.it
In the continuous effort to save rhinoceros from poachers, conservationists in South Africa are now airlifting rhinos to safer areas.

Via Wildlife Defence
8A JonathanS's insight:
This article is talking about how people have found a good but quite complicated solution on saving and transporting rhinos to safer places where their protected from poachers. The process requires the animals to be drugged first so they don’t react as the people taking care of them tie their ankles together and hook it to a helicopter that flies them to a safer area away from poachers. It may sound quite terrible but its better having them go through a short period of flying upside down about 500-1000 feet up in the air than getting killed by some poachers who'll just take away their lives for money. Airlifting rhinos has been the adopted method for saving rhinos since the World Wildlife Fund’s Black Rhino Range Expansion Project went into effect in 2003. With poachers killing over 1,000 rhinos last year alone for their ivory horns, the endangered creatures don’t have much of a choice anymore for survival unless they’re moved away from their killers. 

This article relates a lot to what we've been talking about and the "Kenya Poaching Sheet" we've read in class. I think this is a good solution but it seems a bit horrible to send rhinos flying like that. On the other side its a way better solution than just letting them all die. I think its really good that between all those evil people there are people that actually care about these innocent animals and do their very best to try and help them and keep them safe. This article was really interesting and I learned a lot from it and it made me see more on whats actually going on and how big this poaching crisis really is. 
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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Africa | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."

8A JonathanS's insight:

https://geographyeducation.org/courses/regional-geography-geog-400/modern-slavery/

 

This article describes when people in Africa are victims of modern day slavery. It tells us how people are forced into working long long hours a day with no breaks, barely any food or water and a very unsafe working environment. Some examples of what these poor people are forced into working as are laborers, prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides. Many people are also forced into marriages and illegal mining and smuggling of goods across borders . There are currently about 30 million modern day slaves all over the world. Their mostly in large parts of Africa and most of India. There's also some in Europe and in the U.S. One of the most unsafe working environment these slaves are forced into working in are the illegal mining projects. Their forced to work long hours in a mine that could collapse any second with nothing but a cheap flashlight tied to their head and a shovel or spade. 

 

I think this article connects to what were working on in class about modern slavery and Africa. I think this is very sad because I think everybody has the right to do what they feel like and deserve their freedom just like most people. This is extremely unfair and I think that more people should try and do something about it. Of course there are already loads of people trying to prevent this issue from spreading and I think it's a very kind and respectful thing to do. I did learn a lot from this article tho and the TED talk. One thing I learned was that this problem mostly appears in Africa. I honestly though that Asia and more parts of South America would have this issue as well. So yes, I learned quite a lot from this and I think that it was a good article with lots of useful information and I got a lot of emotional feelings from seeing the video.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .