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How Being Bilingual Can Get You Hired - Idealist

How Being Bilingual Can Get You Hired - Idealist | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

Linguistic fluency comes in many varieties. If you learned a second language in school, you’ve probably mastered reading, speaking, and listening. But if you spoke two languages at home or learned a second language specific to your ethnic background, you may also be bicultural—someone with insider knowledge of two different cultures. This includes the dominant culture of the country you’re in; for example, the English-speaking culture in many areas of the United States.

Each culture has its own rituals, values, and behaviors that go far beyond language. A bicultural candidate will be able to navigate between the complex aspects of both cultures. While this perspective is key when working with diverse cultural groups, it also gives you a skill you can apply in any job—the ability to understand and combine multiple perspectives at once, known as integrative complexity. Your aptitudes count as a bonus in many ways, from interpersonal skills like mediation and conflict resolution to brainstorming big ideas for an organizational mission.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Thanks Jo Sgro for recommending this article!

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Advocate for Languages!
Collection of articles that discuss the cognitive and social benefits of learning a second/foreign language and the preferred approaches to teaching/learning.
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The contemporary challenges facing plurilingual societies

The contemporary challenges facing plurilingual societies | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
All societies are fundamentally plurilingual.  Accepting and working with this fact is more productive than ignoring or trying to suppress linguistic plurality; and in the long run it can have a transformative effect on both societies and individuals.

The term plurilingual is often used in educational contexts, but it is also useful for thinking about the interface between education and society, and about society more widely. It is also a more flexible term than, say, multilingual, which can imply many discrete languages used separately on different occasions or by different people.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

An excellent article.  Thanks Marisa Schiavi for the recommendation. Click the title to read the full article.

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Languages education in Australia: make it about communication –

Languages education in Australia: make it about communication – | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
The current system of languages education that prioritises language accuracy over fluency is doing students few favours. Fluency relates more to real-life interactions where errors are often made, but speakers’ confidence in their ability to communicate grows. What's needed is a stronger commitment to communication. Read more at Monash Lens.
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Australia needs to make languages compulsory

Australia needs to make languages compulsory | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
If Australia really wants to increase its literacy in Asian and other languages it needs to make language learning compulsory in Australian schools.

 

Over many decades, governments and others have made commitments to increasing Australia’s ‘Asia literacy’. But is this goal being met? Has the growth in investment in language programs and language study seen in the 1980s resulted in lasting change, or is Australia still largely complacent about Asian language education?

Professor Joe Lo Bianco, one of Australia’s most respected experts in language education, says if Australia really wants to increase its language literary—in Asian and other languages—it needs to make language learning compulsory in Australian schools.

Professor Lo Bianco speaks here with Melbourne Asia Review’s Managing Editor, Cathy Harper.

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What did the PISA 2018 global competence test assess, and why is it important?

Today’s students live in an interconnected, diverse and rapidly changing world. In this complex environment, a student’s ability to understand the world and appreciate the multiple different perspectives they are likely to encounter is key to their success.

In 2018, the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) conducted its first evaluation of students’ capacity to live in an interconnected world. The assessment focused on students’ knowledge of issues of local and global significance, including public health, economic and environmental issues, as well as their intercultural knowledge, skills and attitudes. The results of this assessment – PISA 2018 Volume VI – will be launched on 22 October.

Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills, and students from around the world explain why these skills are important in today’s interconnected world.

#StudentsThriveTogether #OECDPISA

Read more about PISA: https://www.oecd.org/pisa/

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How learning another language shapes the new you

How learning another language shapes the new you | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

Language educator Associate Professor Andy GaoUNSW School of Education, says there are many benefits to language learning. But aside from being a great hobby or addition to your resume, perhaps the most important is that it opens our perspectives. In his words, it fundamentally changes who we are.

“Learning languages is an enriching and rewarding experience, and there are many tangible benefits in terms of opening up different career options,” A/Prof. Gao says. “But more importantly, learning a different language is an opportunity to expand your understanding of other people and their culture, including your own people and culture, and create a more enriching life.”

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French leave - Language not taught at Belconnen High

French leave - Language not taught at Belconnen High | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
A petition to the ACT Legislative Assembly calls for French - not taught since 2017 - to recommence at Belconnen High School.
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Don't be afraid to pass your first language, and accent, to your kids. It could be their superpower

Don't be afraid to pass your first language, and accent, to your kids. It could be their superpower | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Many migrant parents are hesitant to pass their language accent onto their children. They fear this may lead them to experience discrimination. But speaking two languages has many advantages.
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Thousands of migrant teachers are struggling to get their skills recognised in Australia

Thousands of migrant teachers are struggling to get their skills recognised in Australia | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Employing a more diverse range of teachers should also be front of mind, he says.

"Our problem here is that although something like 20 per cent of our students have a language other than English at home, only about 10 per cent of teachers do.

“We need teachers in the schools who are bilingual and are bicultural. That's the benefits."
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Why we should learn German | Languages | The Guardian

Why we should learn German | Languages | The Guardian | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
The decision to learn a foreign language is to me an act of friendship. It is indeed a holding out of the hand. It’s not just a route to negotiation. It’s also to get to know you better, to draw closer to you and your culture, your social manners and your way of thinking. And the decision to teach a foreign language is an act of commitment, generosity and mediation.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Relevant to the learning of any language. A beautiful piece written by the late John Le Carré.

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Housing a sense of self: for migrant communities, bilingual school programs are about more than learning

Housing a sense of self: for migrant communities, bilingual school programs are about more than learning | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Bilingual language programs are not the only way to maintain local community languages, and in fact few bilingual programs across the country explicitly serve this purpose. But they present a powerful, and rare, opportunity to support such languages, while still offering benefits to the rest of the school community.

As language and literacy experts have recognised, bi- or multilingual children in Australia are chronically underestimated and undervalued in our education system; the system “kills off” languages already existing in their community during early school years, only to encourage new languages in the final years of schooling, when it is least effective.
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Going on a grammar hunt? Forget it, says author Michael Rosen

Going on a grammar hunt? Forget it, says author Michael Rosen | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

Know your gerund from your genitive? Your imperative from your indicative? Your perfect from your past continuous?

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt author Michael Rosen says you shouldn’t get hung up on such minutiae after joining a debate about grammar sparked by a tweet from writer Siri Kale. He takes issue with the teaching of grammar, saying it is an “illusion” that there is one agreed set of rules that does the job.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Nice article to spark discussion about the teaching of grammar/systems of language, languages as dynamic, and acquisition vs learning.

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Actively speaking two languages delays the onset of mild cognitive impairment

Actively speaking two languages delays the onset of mild cognitive impairment | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
As well as allowing us to communicate with other people, languages are the tool we use to convey our thoughts, identity, knowledge, and the way we see and understand the world.

As well as allowing us to communicate with other people, languages are the tool we use to convey our thoughts, identity, knowledge, and the way we see and understand the world. Mastering more than one language enriches us, provides a gateway to other cultures and, according to a team of researchers led by scientists from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), actively using them also brings us neurological benefits and protects us from cognitive impairment associated with ageing.

In a paper published in Neuropsychologia, the researchers conclude that speaking two languages on a regular basis - and having done so all one's life - enhances cognitive reserve and delays the appearance of symptoms associated with cognitive decline and dementia.

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Government coronavirus messages left 'nonsensical' after being translated into other languages - ABC News

Government coronavirus messages left 'nonsensical' after being translated into other languages - ABC News | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
"Nonsensical" and "laughable" language translations of COVID-19 public health messages are being distributed to multicultural communities, prompting fears migrants and refugees will lose trust in the Federal Government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Translating and interpreting are the highest level language skills.  There is a message in this for schools and other institutions that to convey communication correctly and to respect the listener/reader, use a skilled and NAATI qualified translator/interpreter. Reliance on apps and electronic translators doesn't cut it when the information being communicated is life threatening, sensitive or highly confidential. To access a T/I visit https://www.tisnational.gov.au/

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Australian students say they understand global issues, but few are learning another language compared to the OECD average

Australian students say they understand global issues, but few are learning another language compared to the OECD average | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Learning a foreign language is hard. It teaches valuable lessons about vulnerability, compassion for those who struggle to be understood and differences in cultural norms.

Language learning has been shown to enhance cognitive abilities and support improved reading and maths achievement. To achieve mastery, language learning requires determination and resilience — attributes students will need to thrive as adults.
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Teaching young children in the language they speak at home is essential to eliminate Learning Poverty

Teaching young children in the language they speak at home is essential to eliminate Learning Poverty | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Children learn more and are more likely to stay in school if they are first taught in a language that they speak and understand. Yet, an estimated 37 percent of students in low- and middle-income countries are required to learn in a different language, putting them at a significant disadvantage throughout their school life and limiting their learning potential.
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Is It Still Relevant To Learn Languages In 2020? (5 reasons why)

LEARN LANGUAGES with OUINO: http://www.OUINO.com

Translation technology is improving by the minute. English is increasingly becoming a global language. It's no wonder some people doubt that it's still worth learning a new language in this day and age. We believe that it's getting increasingly important to learn other languages in this connected world. In this post, we’ll take a look at 5 reasons why you should seriously consider learning a new language.
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What matters for language learning?: The questionnaire framework for the PISA 2025 Foreign Language Assessment | en | OECD

What matters for language learning?: The questionnaire framework for the PISA 2025 Foreign Language Assessment | en | OECD | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

For the first time, PISA 2025 will assess foreign language skills on a global scale. This paper provides a framework for collecting policy and contextual information on foreign language learning from students, parents, teachers, school principals and government officials. The framework will be used to guide the PISA 2025 Foreign Language Assessment questionnaire development, and to interpret and to produce policy-relevant analyses based on the data on 15-year-old students’ proficiency in foreign languages. For academics and practitioners, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of the factors influencing foreign language learning, based on an in-depth review of the international literature and past assessments in this area, and on discussions with experts in the field and OECD countries. The framework is centred around four policy domains: Government and school policies, Students and learning, Teachers’ training and profile, and Teaching practices. In addition, the framework addresses two transversal topics that overlap these four policy domains: Information and communication technologies, and the Use of the target language for instruction in other subjects.

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Is your kid studying a second language at school? How much they learn will depend on where you live

Is your kid studying a second language at school? How much they learn will depend on where you live | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Learning a language to speak adequately requires a minimum of around 870 hours. Some Australian states mandate around 1,000 hours through secondary school, but others require less than half that time.
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Native language classes in Sydney's south-west leap in popularity as kids aim to keep their mother tongue - ABC News

Native language classes in Sydney's south-west leap in popularity as kids aim to keep their mother tongue - ABC News | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

Dr Mahboob said parents who saw language as an inheritance, rather than just a tool for communication, were more likely to raise multilingual children.

"Language is a tool for communication, but not the same as communication. We learn it from our caregivers, parents and ancestors. It has come down across generations," he said.

"Instead of seeing it as inheritance, we always see it as communication, degrading the value of the language itself, of the mother tongue.

"If we look at what it actually captures it helps us make sense of the world around us."

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Development of L1 is crucial in development of additional languages. Community language classes play a really important role in helping learners build on the language of the home and develop and broaden language and contexts.

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Media statements - New languages for Western Australian schools

Media statements - New languages for Western Australian schools | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

Education and Training Minister Sue Ellery today announced the development of three new languages for WA schools.

Pre-primary to Year 10 syllabuses for both Hindi and Korean will be adapted from the curriculum developed by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA).

Year 11 and 12 syllabuses for these two languages will be developed in Western Australia.

Tamil will be fully developed in WA for Pre-primary to Year 12.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Click the title to read the full media release.

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Why are we learning languages in a closed world? - BBC Worklife

Why are we learning languages in a closed world? - BBC Worklife | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
As Covid-19 swept the globe and shattered old certainties, some took stock and decided it was time to tackle long-neglected life goals. A recent British Council survey on lockdown language-learning suggests that for many UK adults, a lack of foreign language skills is a cause of regret. Only 9% of respondents said they had kept up the foreign language they learned at school, but 64% wished they had done so. The pandemic may have tapped into that pent-up interest.
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Federal Government used Google Translate for COVID-19 messaging aimed at multicultural communities - ABC News

Federal Government used Google Translate for COVID-19 messaging aimed at multicultural communities - ABC News | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it
Mohammad Al-Khafaji, the chief executive of peak multicultural body the Federation of Ethnic Community Councils Australia (FECCA), said using Google Translate on an official Government website was never acceptable.

"We know the automated translated services are not accurate sometimes and they can be very dangerous — the slightest change can completely change the meaning," he said.

"There are many different languages where omitting the smallest letter or space will give the exact opposite meaning — so instead of saying 'stay at home' it might say 'do not stay at home'."
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Stop telling students to study STEM instead of humanities for the post-coronavirus world

Stop telling students to study STEM instead of humanities for the post-coronavirus world | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

According to the OECD, “globally competent individuals can examine local, global and intercultural issues, understand and appreciate different perspectives and world views, interact successfully and respectfully with others, and take responsible action toward sustainability and collective well-being.”

The OECD believes “educating for global competence can boost employability,” and also believes that all subjects can introduce global competence.

It seems to us learning history and other humanities disciplines are effective ways to foster the elements of global competence outlined in their description.

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What’s in a name?

Australian kids talk about how it feels to have their names mispronounced.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

I can relate to this. From an early age I used to dread roll call... the anxiety used to build until the teacher got to "R".

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Politics making a tricky subject harder- ABC News

Politics making a tricky subject harder- ABC News | Advocate for Languages! | Scoop.it

With a career in Australia-China relations spanning decades, Professor Chey has watched this trend play out and says although things have changed from when she began studying China, young Australians learning Mandarin today face a new set of challenges.

"It's like pushing a great weight uphill, very slowly, and it keeps rolling back again," she said.

"Understanding China is so important to Australia's future, but it also helps you to develop as a person, you're not just studying a language, you're learning to look at the world in a different way."

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