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Video Tutorials for Teachers on Using Augmented Reality App Aurasma ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Video Tutorials for Teachers on Using Augmented Reality App Aurasma ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Zombies | Scoop.it

"Talking about augmented reality technology in teaching and learning the first thing that comes to mind is this wonderful app called Aurasma. Since its release a few years ago, Aurasma gained so much in popularity and several teachers have already embraced it within their classrooms. For those of you who are not yet familiar with how Aurasma works and how to use in it in your class, the video tutorials below will help you out."


Via John Evans
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Gary Harwell's curator insight, July 7, 2014 1:55 AM

Students really love Aurasma.

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Why Teachers Should Play Minecraft In Class (EdSurge News)

Why Teachers Should Play Minecraft  In Class (EdSurge News) | Zombies | Scoop.it

'Minecraft Teacher' Joel Levin shares his tips for getting on the game in class.

 

Interview with Joel Levin

 

“What’s interesting about Minecraft is that it’s been taken up by teachers in all subject areas and used in radically different ways” from math and science to cyberbullying. “There’s a quality of Minecraft [in that] because it’s so simple in some ways...that teachers could immediately project into that space a sense of what they could do with it, rather than ‘this game comes to me wholly packaged in terms of what it wants to do for me and what it is going to do for our kids.’”


Via Jim Lerman
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Teaching and Learning with Minecraft: Liam O’Donnell | DMLcentral

Teaching and Learning with Minecraft: Liam O’Donnell | DMLcentral | Zombies | Scoop.it

Just as blocks have no inherent curricular power other than experience in making big things by stacking smaller things in the right order, the ability of computer-controlled pixels to convey important knowledge depends entirely on what (and how) they are used. That’s where teachers come in…and why some are beginning to use an inexpensive online game to teach everything from philosophy to biology: Minecraft.

 


Via Nik Peachey, Cynthia Alvarado
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Peter Fruhmann's curator insight, July 11, 2013 3:42 AM

An appealing concept: a game that could help teachers and pupils / students with not only conveying knowledge but also with the development of social skills and collaborative storytelling. Interesting article, there is also the mentioning of the developmet of a wiki for educational purposes.

Tracy Bodzioch Feighery's curator insight, July 11, 2013 10:17 PM

I am interested in learning more about integrating gaming into curriculum to teach 21st Century Skills.

Maryanne Burgos's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:27 AM

Worth trying out.

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Random Acts Of Kindness Can Make Kids More Popular

Random Acts Of Kindness Can Make Kids More Popular | Zombies | Scoop.it

In the aftermath of Christmas, a parent could be forgiven for thinking that materialism has trumped human kindness.

 

Take heart. Children can easily become kinder and more helpful. And that behavior makes them more positive, more accepting and more popular.

 

At least that's how it worked for fourth- and fifth-graders in Vancouver, Canada. Researchers there have been studying empathy and altruism in schoolchildren for decades.

 

"How do we decrease bullying, increase empathy and caring for others?" says Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, an applied developmental psychologist at the University of British Columbia who helped lead the experiment.

 

They wanted to see how performing random acts of kindness would influence that. But one measurement thrown into the mix almost as an afterthought — being liked by peers — was the quality most improved by helpful acts.

 

The researchers asked 9- to 11-year-olds in 19 classrooms to either perform three acts of kindness or visit three places each week (the tourists were the control group).

 

The acts of kindness were simple. The children gave mom a hug when she was stressed out, shared their lunches, or vacuumed the floor.

 

After four weeks, the researchers tested the kids and compared the results with tests they'd taken before. All the children had more positive emotions, and were slightly happier.


Via Ashish Umre
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D.j. Burrough's curator insight, October 10, 2013 4:01 PM

Probably works just as well for adults.