Zero Footprint
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We absolutely can reduce our ecological footprint all the way down to zero!
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Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from Cities, urban management and ecosystem services
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This eco-village is designed to be fully self-sufficient, from energy to food to waste

This eco-village is designed to be fully self-sufficient, from energy to food to waste | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it
RegenVillages, which is a spin-off company of Stanford University, is working on a pilot development of 25 homes in Almere, Netherlands, beginning this summer, with the aim of integrating local energy production (using biogas, solar, geothermal, and other modalities), along with intensive food production methods (vertical farming, aquaponics and aeroponics, permaculture, and others) and 'closed-loop' waste-to-resource systems, along with intelligent water and energy management systems. 

"We're really looking at a global scale. We are redefining residential real-estate development by creating these regenerative neighborhoods, looking at first these greenfield pieces of farmland where we can produce more organic food, more clean water, more clean energy, and mitigate more waste than if we just left that land to grow organic food or do permaculture there." - James Ehrlich, CEO of ReGen Villages

Via David Rowing, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Marc Kneepkens, Mário Carmo
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 5, 2016 8:17 AM

Getting ready for the #population boom and working with limited #resources.

Rescooped by Daniel LaLiberte from Agriculture and the Natural World
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Scientists develop CO2 sequestration technique that produces 'supergreen' hydrogen fuel

Scientists develop CO2 sequestration technique that produces 'supergreen' hydrogen fuel | Zero Footprint | Scoop.it

(Phys.org) —Lawrence Livermore scientists have discovered and demonstrated a new technique to remove and store atmospheric carbon dioxide while generating carbon-negative hydrogen and producing alkalinity, which can be used to offset ocean acidification.


The team demonstrated, at a laboratory scale, a system that uses the acidity normally produced in saline water electrolysis to accelerate silicate mineral dissolution while producing hydrogen fuel and other gases. The resulting electrolyte solution was shown to be significantly elevated in hydroxide concentration that in turn proved strongly absorptive and retentive of atmospheric CO2.

 

Further, the researchers suggest that the carbonate and bicarbonate produced in the process could be used to mitigate ongoing ocean acidification, similar to how an Alka Seltzer neutralizes excess acid in the stomach.

 

"When powered by renewable electricity and consuming globally abundant minerals and saline solutions, such systems at scale might provide a relatively efficient, high-capacity means to consume and store excess atmospheric CO2 as environmentally beneficial seawater bicarbonate or carbonate," Rau said. "But the process also would produce a carbon-negative 'super green' fuel or chemical feedstock in the form of hydrogen."


Via Darin Hoagland
Daniel LaLiberte's insight:

Seems natural to build such a process into a large number of offshore wind turbines, maybe combined with wave energy and solar energy systems.  The distribution of acid-neutralizing carbonate and bicarbonate would be as diffuse as the distributed energy generation. 

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Darin Hoagland's curator insight, May 29, 2013 10:03 PM

Interesting renewable fuel possibility and global warming correction.