Yr 7-10 Geography
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The Root Causes of Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 5:07 PM

This video is an excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues. This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.

 

Scoop.it Tags: food, poverty, economic, political, food desert, agriculture, food production.

WordPress TAGS: food, poverty, economic, Political, food desert, agriculture, food production.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 12, 10:21 AM
Unit 5 Ag 
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Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Our new “Country of the Week” feature will introduce students to a country via a recent video or photograph, ask them to find that place on a map, and more.
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Marine Critical Issues: Case Studies

Marine Critical Issues: Case Studies | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Students use case studies to examine human impacts on marine ecosystems. They evaluate case studies in terms of an area's history, geography, habitats, species, stakeholders, human uses and impacts, and management goals.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 24, 2017 9:28 PM

Option topic: Marine environments 

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How the first city got started 12,000 years ago

"In this animated video, Jonathan F. P. Rose explains how the first city was started in Turkey, 12,000 years ago."


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Angel Peeples's curator insight, May 11, 2017 2:41 PM
  This article is related to world cultural by being about urbanization. My opinion on this article is that I cant believe that it was that long ago the first city started. Turkey was the first place of the first city because it was were agriculture started. I think it is pretty cool it all started with a structure that people just started building around. 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:03 PM

What led to the first urban settlements? We know that the beginnings of agriculture are closely connected to the first forays into agriculture and the domestication of animals.  This brief video puts some archeological specificity on the though exercise, "what would you need to start the first city in a world without cities?" 

 

Tags: urban, placehistorical.

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How to make awesome interactive map using Google Sheets in under 1 minute? - Geoawesomeness

How to make awesome interactive map using Google Sheets in under 1 minute? - Geoawesomeness | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Tweet Share on Facebook Share Share Email Pin Pocket Flipboard From time to time you need to very quickly make a choropleth map based on a spreadsheet. There are a lot of different ways to do it but most of them require registering in one of the mapping services, having Excel plugin or a GIS software installed. …
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As Climate Change Accelerates, Floating Cities Look Like Less of a Pipe Dream

As Climate Change Accelerates, Floating Cities Look Like Less of a Pipe Dream | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
A costly plan to build floating islands shows how climate change is pushing the search for innovative solutions, but some critics ask who will ultimately benefit.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 3, 2017 3:59 PM

As coastal communities are considering what the tangible impacts of climate change might be, things that were once considered science fiction could be a part of how people adapt to the modifications we've collectively made to our global environment that we depend on to sustain life.  

 

Tags: physicaltechnologysustainability, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastal, environment dependenvironment adapt, environment modify.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 14, 2017 7:49 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective.
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PlayGround -The world’s biggest urban green project

PlayGround -The world’s biggest urban green project | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
#MostViewed2016 The world’s biggest urban nature project is in Mexico and is called VIA VERDE.
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Mapping the World's Migration Flows

Mapping the World's Migration Flows | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Visualizing the flow of the world's migrants from country to country.

 

Based on data from the U.N. Population Division, this map shows the estimated net migration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015.

Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people.

Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. Click a circle to view only the migration flows in and out of that country.

For more info about this map, read the article, All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map.

 

Tags: migration, USA, mapping, population, unit 2 population.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, December 13, 2016 8:33 PM
Geography Concept Focus: Patterns and Trends
Leah Goyer's curator insight, December 14, 2016 1:30 PM
What a fascinating view.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:46 PM

Migration at a global scale changes places 

 

Syllabus

Students investigate reasons for and effects of internal migration in Australia and another country, for example: 

  • analysis of trends in temporary and permanent internal migration
  • discussion of economic, social or environmental consequences of internal migration on places of origin and destination

Students investigate the reasons for and effects of international migration to Australia, for example: 

  • analysis of international migration patterns 
  • explanation of where and why international migrants settle within Australia 
  • examination of characteristics and spatial patterns of Australia’s cultural diversity 

Geoworld 9 NSW
Chapter 8: Migration changes Australia and the USA

8.1 Migration: people own the move

8.2 Australia: destination nation

8.3 Where do immigrants settle

8.4 Culturally diverse australia: trends in migration

 

8.8 Australians are mobile people

8.9 Mobile indigenous populations

8.19 Lifestyle migration

8.11 The power of resources: the Pilbara

8.12 Migration changes the USA

Geothink 

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​11 of our Planet’s Most Jaw-Dropping Landscapes

​11 of our Planet’s Most Jaw-Dropping Landscapes | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 10, 2016 4:49 AM

The images are beautiful - it's about the landforms and landscapes not the travel promotion

 

Introduce this topic using stunning photos or short video clips such as this.
Have students recognise and distinguish between landforms and landscape - do not give them a definition. Work out out.

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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 2016 9:14 AM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  ESRI has share a "Maps we love" page with excellent examples of Story Maps and carefully explains WHY these maps work and HOW they were made.  Are you new to using the Analysis tool in ArcGIS Online?  Try this exercise on analyzing flood risk to guide you through some of the steps to learn what is possible for a project of your own.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 

 

Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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An exciting lesson exploring GPS and geo-tagging.

An exciting lesson exploring GPS and geo-tagging. | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
As part of our ICT curriculum, we cover the global positioning system (GPS) and geo-tagging. In simple terms, these are markers of the coordinates (latitude and longitude) of where you are in the world.
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Earth Temperature Timeline

Earth Temperature Timeline | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2016 2:03 PM

This infographic is a fascinating way to put into context the very recent trend of rising global temperatures.  This is worth scrolling all the way through to make the ending all the more meaningful.  Oh yeah, and August 2016 was the hottest month in recorded history...only 11 months of record-breaking temperatures.  

 

TagsXKCD, artinfographic, physicalhistorical, environment, climate change.

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Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography

Bangladesh's Hazardous Geography | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Bangladesh is exposed to threat of hazards resulting from a number of natural disasters and remains classified as one the most vulnerable countries. Majority of the country is affected by cyclone, drought and floods.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2016 4:53 PM

Bangladesh is regularly hit with different types of natural disasters. The impact of these natural disasters costs the country millions making it dependent on foreign aid.  Disaster clean-up and relief aid after major floods, droughts, and hurricanes.  

 

Tagsdisasters, environmentBangladeshSouth Asia, development.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:47 PM

Multiple challenges already face residents of Dhaka and Bangladesh in its entirety, but add into the mix climate change and the situation becomes even worse. How does this human induced phenomenon impact upon the population of the developing country and its ever-growing Mega City?

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 22, 10:53 AM
These maps help show all of the natural disasters that Bangladesh is accustomed to. As one look through all of the maps that shows such things such as flood zone, cyclone zones, and drought zones we can tell that this country is ripe with geographical issues that will effect its problems both politically and economically.  With this many geographical problems with natural disasters one can only imagine how much money the country spends simply on just rebuilding itself. It is hard to continue to move forward as a country when you need to constantly rebuild. Also you become dependent on other countries with a need for foreign aid for these problems. By needing foreign aid Bangladesh becomes dependent on these countries thus making it harder for them to make good deals for their economy. If you were setting up the perfect location for a country, Bangladesh probably would not be the first place selected. However, we must look at the history of the people that live there and see why this location was chosen?  Also we must look at the future and with a changing climate how will it effect Bangladesh geography, and will we eventually see people moving out of the country and how will that effect the surrounding areas and their population. 
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Too Many Men

Too Many Men | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

"Nothing like this has happened in human history. A combination of cultural preferences, government decree and modern medical technology in the world’s two largest countries has created a gender imbalance on a continental scale. Men outnumber women by 70 million in China and India."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 26, 3:46 PM

There are far-reaching consequences to the gender imbalances in India and China.  The fantastically rich article covers four major impacts: 

Village life and mental health. Among men, loneliness and depression are widespread. Villages are emptying out. Men are learning to cook and perform other chores long relegated to women.

Housing prices and savings rates. Bachelors are furiously building houses in China to attract wives, and prices are soaring. But otherwise they are not spending, and that in turn fuels China’s huge trade surplus. In India, there is the opposite effect: Because brides are scarce, families are under less pressure to save for expensive dowries. 

Human trafficking. Trafficking of brides is on the rise. Foreign women are being recruited and lured to China, effectively creating similar imbalances in China’s neighbors.

Public safety. With the increase in men has come a surge in sexual crime in India and concerns about a rise in other crimes in both countries. Harassment of schoolgirls in India has in some towns sparked an effort to push back — but at a cost of restricting them to more protected lives.

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

Kami Romeike's curator insight, July 4, 3:21 AM

There are far-reaching consequences to the gender imbalances in India and China.  The fantastically rich article covers four major impacts: 

Village life and mental health. Among men, loneliness and depression are widespread. Villages are emptying out. Men are learning to cook and perform other chores long relegated to women.

Housing prices and savings rates. Bachelors are furiously building houses in China to attract wives, and prices are soaring. But otherwise they are not spending, and that in turn fuels China’s huge trade surplus. In India, there is the opposite effect: Because brides are scarce, families are under less pressure to save for expensive dowries. 

Human trafficking. Trafficking of brides is on the rise. Foreign women are being recruited and lured to China, effectively creating similar imbalances in China’s neighbors.

Public safety. With the increase in men has come a surge in sexual crime in India and concerns about a rise in other crimes in both countries. Harassment of schoolgirls in India has in some towns sparked an effort to push back — but at a cost of restricting them to more protected lives.

 

Tags: gender, ChinaIndia, culture, population.

Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:19 PM
population

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What the World Will Look Like 4°C Warmer

What the World Will Look Like 4°C Warmer | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Will your grandchildren live in cities on Antarctica?
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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 2017 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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Nat Geo Launched a Free Website for Printing Detailed Topographical Maps

Nat Geo Launched a Free Website for Printing Detailed Topographical Maps | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
The folks at National Geographic just did a solid favor for all the adventurous outdoor photographers out there. They put every US Geological Survey (USGS)
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 21, 2017 5:58 PM
A great resource for integrating tool maps into a landscape study using USA landscapes and landforms
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Google Maps Smarty Pins

Google Maps Smarty Pins | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Smarty Pins is a Google Maps based geography and trivia game.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2017 2:05 PM

As stated in a review of Smarty Pins on Mashable, "Google unveiled a fun new game this week that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  Called 'Smarty Pins' the game starts players off with 1,000 miles (or 1,609 kilometers if they're not based in the United States), and asks them to drop a pin on the city that corresponds with the correct answer to a given question." 

 

This game is wonderfully addictive...I haven't enjoyed a mapping trivia platform this much since I discovered GeoGuessr.  How far can you get before you run out of miles?  

 

Tagsgoogle, fun, mapping, place, trivia.

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The Sargasso Sea

"The Sargasso Sea occupies almost two thirds of the North Atlantic Ocean. Within this sea, circling ocean currents accumulate mats of Sargassum seaweed that shelter a surprising variety of fishes, snails, crabs, and other small animals. The animal community today is much less diverse than it was in the early 1970s, when the last detailed studies were completed in this region. This study shows that animal communities in the Sargasso Sea are definitely changing. The next step is to find out why."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2017 9:58 AM

Often, we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their defining characteristics (this is one reason why many don't know about the Southern Ocean as a distinct body of water or consider it an ocean). The Sargasso Sea is defined by ocean currents; it is surrounded by great currents but is itself without a strong current, making it perilous for early seafarers.  These oceanic doldrums became shrouded in superstition as stories of the fabled Bermuda Triangle spread, but the truth is all in the ocean currents.   

 

Tags: water, biogeography, environment, physical.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 22, 2017 7:38 PM
Geography Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships
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How to Integrate Green Screens Into Any Classroom

Green screens, once a staple of any special effects film studio, are now becoming an exciting and realistic addition for any digital classroom. But where to begin?With a digital camera,
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27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness

27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

"The images come from the amazing book called “Overview: A New Perspective of Earth”. that just hit the stores around the world. The book is a stunning and unique collection of satellite images of Earth that offer an unexpected look at humanity, derived from the wildly popular Daily Overview Instagram account followed by almost 0.5 million people."

 

Hagadera, seen here on the right, is the largest section of the Dadaab Refugee Camp in Northern Kenya and is home to 100,000 refugees. To cope with the growing number of displaced Somalis arriving at Dadaab, the UN has begun moving people into a new area called the LFO extension, seen here on the left. Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with an estimated total population of 400,000.


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The Environmental Cost of Consumption

The Environmental Cost of Consumption | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

Environmental artist J Henry Fair captures the beauty and destruction of industrial sites to illustrate the hidden impacts of the things we buy – the polluted air, destroyed habitats and the invisible carbon heating the planet


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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:28 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impacts of human use of resources. The beautiful images illustrate the extreme impact on the environment.
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:30 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impact of human activity on environments.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:37 PM

Production and consumption - interconnections and consequences 

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'Reimagined' Sydney must be three cities: Lucy Turnbull

'Reimagined' Sydney must be three cities: Lucy Turnbull | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it
Sydney has to become three 30-minute cities, the Eastern Harbour City, the Central Parramatta River City, and the Western City, to successfully deal with population growth, Greater Sydney Commission chief Lucy Turnbull says.
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 20, 2016 12:52 AM
Australia's urban future - a focus on liveability and sustainability
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Climate Comparison Maps

Climate Comparison Maps | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

"Triton1982 makes maps by comparing each of the city's highest and lowest average temperatures against the Koppen classification system."


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Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 2, 5:47 PM
This map is a great visual representation of the large temperature variations in Australia. I should also point out that this connects to the article I shared earlier about the distribution of Australia's population: notice how the climates of the perimeter of the country are relatively comfortable (with the possible exception of the northern portion that is similar to India). This puts Australia's climates into perspective, explaining why no one in their right mind would want to live in the interior, unless they enjoy slowly roasting to death.
Taylor Doonan's curator insight, May 3, 12:44 PM
This images shows how diverse Australia really is, they have climates similar to different cities all over the world. The southern coasts are similar to California, but the interior of the country is a desert, for such a small continent it has some of the most varying climates. 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 10:23 PM
This is an interesting map that compares Australia's climate to that of other regions. By doing this, the artist clearly explains how vast Australia's climate truly is. Because of its size, it is possible to think that Australia would not have such a diverse climate. However, its regions are comparable to deserts, the tropics, and temperate zones.
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The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | Yr 7-10 Geography | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:29 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...