Yellow Journalism
282 views | +0 today
Follow
Yellow Journalism
Kid with yellow sleepwear
Curated by Ayele Lankford
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

Office of the Historian - Milestones - 1866-1898 - U.S. Diplomacy and Yellow Journalism

Office of the Historian - Milestones - 1866-1898 - U.S. Diplomacy and Yellow Journalism | Yellow Journalism | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

R. F. Outcault, The Father of the American Sunday Comics

R. F. Outcault, The Father of the American Sunday Comics | Yellow Journalism | Scoop.it

Annotation:The yellow kids was the foirst to demonstrate that a comic strip character could be merchandised profitably. R.f. was the comic genius who took advantage of the zeitgeist. He was the first to have the intellect and artistic ability to see and depict New York City. Richard was born in Lancaster, Ohio On January 14, 1863. I can tell school was not hard for him because he was born smart.

Who is the Yellow Kid and why is everybody making a fuss over him? The answer is that he was the first successful comic strip character to achieve a popularity so great that he not only increased the sales of newspapers carrying him, but he was also the first to demonstrate that a comic strip character could be merchandised profitably. In fact, for these two reasons, the Yellow Kid and his creator, R. F. Outcault, are generally credited with permanently establishing the comic strip and making it a part of American society. Now let's take a closer look at how this historical milestone actually occurred.

Richard Felton Outcault, known to all who know his work as R. F. Outcault, was the comic genius who took advantage of the Zeitgeist. Others had tried but failed--Outcault was the first to have the intellect and artistic ability to see and depict New York City as many of its residents did, and to be able to present it to them in a manner that made them laugh. And for being in the right place at the right time, and for possessing unusual innate and learned talent, R. F. Outcault became the anointed father of the American comic strip.

Outcault was born in Lancaster, Ohio, on 14 January 1863, the son of Jesse and Catherine Outcault, and died at his Madison Avenue residence/studio in New York City on 25 September 1928. Even as a child it was apparent that he had artistic talent, and he developed that talent with training in the community. He later entered the McMicken University's School of Design in Cincinnati in 1878 and continued his studies for three years. When he left in 1881, he took a job as a painter of pastoral scenes for the Hall Safe and Lock Company. In 1888, the Centennial Exposition of the Ohio Valley and Middle Atlantic States was held in Cincinnati. The Edison Laboratories electric light display needed some sophisticated illustrations and hired Outcault to do the work. His drawings were superlative, and he soon moved to Edison's West Orange, New Jersey, headquarters as a full-time employee. In 1889, Edison named him the official artist for his travelling exhibit and sent him to Paris for the World's Fair, where he also continued his art studies in the Latin Quarter. While in Paris, he developed what was to become a life-long preference for berets and capes.

Outcault returned to New York City in 1890 and joined the staff of Electrical World magazine, which was owned by one of Edison's friends. He also freelanced jokes and cartoons to some of the weekly humor magazines like Truth. His humor and art were well received, and his work appeared more and more frequently, typically focusing on Blacks living in the imaginary town of Possumville or Irish tenement street children living in New York City. Let there be no mistake about it, these cartoons were created for adults, not children. Adults bought the magazines, not children, and the humor was aimed at adults, not children.

2 June 1894, p. 4: Feudal Pride in Hogan's Alley

Feudal Pride in Hogan's Alley

Little Rosilla McGraw -- No; we won't come and play with you, Delia Costigan. Our rejuced means may temporary necessitate our residin' in a rear tenement, but we're jist as exclusive as when we lived on the first floor front and papa had charge of the pound in the Department of Canine Captivity!

Interestingly, virtually no one realizes that the Yellow Kid first appeared in Truth magazine four times before his initial appearance in the newspaper, and at least once more after that date. It is my pleasure to be able to list those four seminal appearances and provide pictures of those cartoons.

1. 2 June 1894, p. 4: Feudal Pride in Hogan's Alley
2. 15 July 1894, p. 14: A Fair Champion
3. 15 September 1894, p. 11: Going by Precept
4. 9 February 1895, p. 10: Fourth Ward Brownies
It must be noted that the last cartoon, "Fourth Ward Brownies," was reprinted eight days later in The New York World and thus also became the first newspaper appearance of the Yellow Kid. The practice of newspapers reprinting cartoons from magazines was not uncommon during that era.

15 July 1894, p. 14

A Fair Champion.

Lorreena Lafferty (as a parting shot)--Remember dis, Issy Silberman may be a motzer. But de day will come as a millionaire banker, an' me his bride, de dust his carriage wheels makes t'roo Forsythe street will not be able den to build youz to his good qualities.

By late 1894, Outcault began submitting work to The New York World, the publication with the largest circulation in America. Morrill Goddard, the Sunday editor, hired him to do popular scientific drawings. His first technical illustration for The New York World was published in September, 1894. Outcault also continued to submit work to Truth and other humor magazines through the end of the 1890's.

15 September 1894, p. 11

Going By Precept

Mr. Dugan (watching the dinner preparations)--Sure, that's too much cabbage for such a little bit of corn bafe! Mrs. Dugan (authoritatively)--Arrah! doesn't everybody say that two heads are better than wan?

Exactly when the Yellow Kid first appeared in the newspaper seems to vary according to the sources that a given author uses, thus perpetuating existing errors. To avoid this problem, I have personally reviewed the microfilm of The New York World for 1894 and 1895, and the Yellow Kid's appearances are very clear. I am now going to list the first ten appearances of the Yellow Kid in the newspaper.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

pulitzerprize.com - pulitzer prize

Get pulitzer prize information, online stores information, ecommerce information at pulitzerprize.com, including related links and much much more...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary List

1)Freelanced- A person who works as a writer. Ralph lauren is a freelanced designer.

2)Sensationalism-The use of or interest in this subject matter. The cheap tabloids relied on sensationalism to increase their circulation. 

3)Peculiar-Strage,queer or odd. The pastor was acting very peculiar today.

4)Sensationalist- Style producing or designed to produce startling or thrilling impressions or to excite and please vulgar taste. 

5)Aforementioned- cited earlier or previsouly.

6)Skeptical- Showing doubt. She is a skeptical young women.

7)Perpetuating-To preserve from extinction or oblivion. To Perpetuate someones name.

8)Sensationalized-To make sensational. 

9)Ironically- The nature of, exhibiting, or characterized. An Ironical compliment.

10)Inadequate-ineffectual in response to emotional.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

Yellow journalism in 19th Century Biddeford | SeacoastOnline.com

Yellow journalism in 19th Century Biddeford | SeacoastOnline.com | Yellow Journalism | Scoop.it
The term "yellow journalism" was coined to describe a sensationalistic style of reporting that was typically unfettered by facts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

Bring back yellow journalism.

Bring back yellow journalism. | Yellow Journalism | Scoop.it
How many times while plowing through a New York Times or Washington Post news story have you muttered to yourself, "I haven't had this much fun since the last time I read a GAO report." That's not to deny the importance of GAO reports or of...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

The 19th century Journalism

The 19th century Journalism | Yellow Journalism | Scoop.it

Annotation: The Industrial Revolution affected the newspaper industry, allowing newspapers access to machines that could easily print thousands of papers in a single night. This was the endless drive for circulation. The remedy to yellow journalism is double and triple checking ones sources and reading between the lines. News papers may some times be reliable sources of information. 1880-1890 the term was coined base on a series of occurrences.

Yellow Journalism
Yellow journalism, in short, is biased opinion masquerading as objective fact. Moreover, the practice of yellow journalism involved sensationalism, distorted stories, and misleading images for the sole purpose of boosting newspaper sales and exciting public opinion. It was particularly indicative of two papers founded and popularized in the late 19th century- The New York World, run by Joseph Pulitzer and The New York Journal, run by William Randolph Hearst.

It all started, some historians believe, with the onset of the rapid industrialization that was happening all around the world. The Industrial Revolution eventually affected the newspaper industry, allowing newspapers access to machines that could easily print thousands of papers in a single night. This is believed to have brought into play one of the most important characteristics of yellow journalism - the endless drive for circulation. And unfortunately, the publisher's greed was very often put before ethics.

Although the actual practice of what would later become known as yellow journalism came into being during a more extended time period (between 1880-1890), the term was first coined based on a series of occurrences in and following the year of 1895. This was the year in which Hearst purchased the New York Journal, quickly becoming a key rival of Pulitzer's. The term was derived, through a series of peculiar circumstances, from a cartoon by the famous 19th century cartoonist, Robert Outcault called "The Yellow Kid" (see second from top). The cartoon was first published in The World, until Hearst hired him away to produce the strip in his newspaper. Pulitzer then hired another artist to produce the same strip in his newspaper. This comic strip happened to use a new special, non-smear yellow ink, and because of the significance of the comic strip, the term "yellow journalism" was coined by critics.

Sadly though, this period of sensationalist news delivery (where the so-called yellow press routinely outsold the more honest, truthful, unbiased newspapers) does stand out as a particularly dark era in journalistic history. The demand of the United States people for absolutely free press allowed such aforementioned newspapers, which often appealed to the shorter attention spans and interests of the lower class, to print whatever they so desired. This means that they could easily steal a headline and story directly from another paper, or simply fabricate a story to fit their particular agenda.

One of the more disturbing features involved with the former practice of yellow journalism, and the period in which it was most active in is that there is no definite line between this period of yellow journalism and the period afterwards. There only exists evidence that such practices were frowned upon by the general public - by 1910, circulation had dropped off very rapidly for such papers. But regardless, does this mean that yellow journalism simply faded away, never to return? Or did it absorb itself into the very heart of our newspapers, where it will remain forever? One thing is for certain - after the late 1800s, newspapers changed drastically, and still show no sign of changing back. The modernly present newspaper appearances of catchy headlines, humorous comic strips, special interest sections, intrusive investigative reporting, et cetera serve as a constant reminder that one must always stay skeptical when examining our news sources.

What is the remedy to yellow journalism? Simply double- and triple-checking one's sources and reading between the lines. If one disregards the obvious marketing that is used to hook readers, newspapers may actually prove to be reliable sources of information.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ayele Lankford
Scoop.it!

The "Yellow Fever" of Journalism

The "Yellow Fever" of Journalism | Yellow Journalism | Scoop.it

Annotation:The yellow fever was created by r.f. outcault and  hearst and pulitzer always fought over it. After hearst offerd pulitzer a salary to use the yellow kid and pulitzer published another version of the cartoon. Their was so much competition between the newspapers that the news was over-dramatized. The yellow kid was used to to sway public opinion on important issues. I think that this is a really good idea, i saw if it makes you money then it doesnt hurt.

The "Yellow Fever" of Journalism

Yellow Journalism is a term first coined during the famous newspaper wars between William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer II.

Pulitzer's paper the New York World and Hearst's New York Journal changed the content of newspapers adding more sensationalized stories and increasing the use of drawings and cartoons.

As more cartoons were being published in newspapers, Pulitzer began to publish a cartoon of his own that he titled "The Yellow Kid" in 1896. The cartoon was created by R.F. Outcault and became one of many objects fought over between Hearst and Pulitzer during their rivalry. Hearst later took Outcault and his cartoon from Pulitzer by offering him an outrageous salary. Pulitzer published another version of the cartoon very similar to "The Yellow Kid" to continue competing with Hearst.

With so much competition between the newspapers, the news was over-dramatized and altered to fit story ideas that publishers and editors thought would sell the most papers and stir the most interest for the public so that news boys could sell more papers on street corners.

They often used the "Yellow Kid" to sensationalize stories and discredit the stories of other newspapers. The "Yellow Kid" was also used to sway public opinion on important issues such as the Spanish-American war. Newspapers of the era did not practice the objectivity that newspapers today strive for.

Many historians believe that Hearst in particular played a major role in the American involvement with Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Hearst saw the war as a prime opportunity to boost his newspaper sales. He was the first newspaper to station a team of reporters in Cuba to monitor the events happening there. Hearst published articles of brutality, cruelty and inadequate care to sway public opinion regarding America's involvement in the war.

Two reporters, Richard Harding Davis and Frederick Remington, were the highest paid reporters for Hearst stationed in Cuba. When Remington sent a telegram telling Hearst that there was not much going on there, Hearst replied with his famous telegram,"You furnish the pictures and I'll furnish the war." This is just a small example of Hearst sensationalized practices(Book # 1 and 2)

Hearst also became very involved with the war itself, after much public swaying through the dramatized stories of his paper, he eventually pushed the President to sign a bill officially entering America into the war.

Ironically, the term "Yellow Journalism" is partly credited to Pulitzer's involvement in the conflict with Hearst. As we are all aware, Pulitzer is now famous for his awards of outstanding journalistic achievement with the Pulitzer Prize.

more...
No comment yet.