Year 9 journal pe
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ADHD linked to mobile use during pregnancy

http://health.ninemsn.com.au/healthnews/8563533/adhd-linked-to-mobile-phone-use-during-pregnancy

Use of mobile phones during pregnancy could be responsible for attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to new research.

 

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Drop a drink, drop a dress size

http://health.ninemsn.com.au/family/goodhealthandmedicine/8563641/drop-a-drink-drop-a-size

Think that nightly glass (or two) of wine won’t expand your waistline? Think again! Alcohol's impact on weight is off the scale

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Ben Cousins 'hid drugs inside body'

Former AFL star Ben Cousins has been released on bail after appearing in a West Australian country magistrates court charged with breaching bail conditions following a drugs arrest at Esperance Airport.

Police confirmed a 33-year-old Bicton man was arrested at 7.15pm on Tuesday night, after arriving at the airport where they were waiting for him.

The troubled Brownlow medallist, who was believed to be heading to the Teen Challenge drug rehabilitation centre outside Esperance, was allegedly found to be in possession of 4.56 grams of methylamphetamine.

More trouble ... Ben Cousins was allegedly caught with drugs at the airport. Photo: Rebecca Hallas

Police will allege the drug was hidden in his rectum, according to The West Australian.

He also was believed to be carrying a large amount cash when he was arrested.

Cousins was charged with possession of a prohibited drug with intent to sell or supply, and released under bail conditions that stipulated he remain in at the drug facility in Esperance.

However, Cousins reportedly argued with staff at the drug facility and was caught trying to leave town at noon the next day. He was arrested for allegedly breaching his bail conditions and appeared in Esperance Magistrates Court, about 750km south-east of Perth, on Wednesday afternoon.

Cousins was represented by top Melbourne QC David Grace when he appeared at the court via video-link yesterday wearing a hooded jumper, boardshorts and thongs, the West Australian reported. He did not enter a plea.

A clerk at the court said that Cousins had appeared and been released to an address in Perth on altered bail conditions. Those conditions are believed to include reporting to police three times a week.

The clerk said Cousins was not in police custody and had been ordered to reappear in Perth Magistrates Court on April 2.

Cousins, a confessed methamphetamine addict, had been attending a drug rehabilitation centre in Esperance called Teen Challenge.

It’s believed he had been undergoing rehab for the past month, but had recently been seen in Perth with his partner, Maylea Tinecheff, and their young baby, Bobby Ernest.

Cousins spent several days in Perth’s Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in January after hitting his head while undergoing rehab at a specialist clinic.

It was believed he fell and hit his head on a wash basin and the floor, suffering injuries to his head and neck.

The footballer, who has had a very public battle with methamphetamine addiction over the years, was one of the most decorated West Coast Eagles players, winning the 2005 Brownlow Medal and playing in their 2006 premiership side before the club sacked him in late 2007 because of his drug use.

He was suspended for 12 months by the AFL for bringing the game into disrepute before ending his playing career with the Richmond Tigers in 2010.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/afl/afl-news/ben-cousins-hid-drugs-inside-body-20120329-1vzdf.html#ixzz1qS6fumst

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Casino bosses warned of staff drug culture

THE gaming giant Tabcorp was warned of an alleged culture of drug and alcohol abuse among senior management at The Star casino, and was advised to swab offices and introduce ''sobriety tests'' to detect cocaine use at work.

The warning was issued by a manager during an investigation by Tabcorp into allegations of widespread substance use within the casino's executive ranks in mid-2010.

However, it is understood Tabcorp did not act on the advice before the casino was demerged from its operations last June and taken over by Echo Entertainment Group, as it claimed it had found insufficient evidence.

A review of The Star's licence conditions for the Casino, Liquor and Gaming Control Authority concluded in December. While it recommended that the licence be renewed, the review raised concerns about how the casino dealt with criminal activity suspected to have occurred on the premises, including loan sharking, prostitution and money laundering.

The authority has also demanded to know details of the sacking last week of its managing director, Sid Vaikunta.

The chief executive of Echo Entertainment Group, Larry Mullin, told the stock exchange last Thursday that Mr Vaikunta had been removed ''after his behaviour in a social work setting'', which is understood to involve allegations of sexual harassment.

The announcement came soon after the December review into the casino to determine whether its licence should be renewed.

The Hospitality Minister, George Souris, has raised questions about the timing of the announcement and why it was not included in information provided to the investigators carrying out the licence review.

A spokeswoman for the authority said yesterday the casino had met the 1pm deadline imposed on it to produce a full explanation of the circumstances surrounding Mr Vaikunta's sacking. She said the authority would ''consider the information provided'' but would not comment further ''until its investigations are concluded''.

Details of the alleged behaviour of Mr Vaikunta have begun to emerge, including reports that he accompanied a member of staff from a cocktail lounge, the Cherry Bar, in a limousine on the night of the incident.

But a casino spokeswoman said: ''We are not aware of the allegations and have no further comment.''

The Herald has been told the then chief executive of Tabcorp, Elmer Funke Kupper, was advised of the warnings about the culture of drug and alcohol abuse that had arisen at the casino and expressed concern.

A spokeswoman for Mr Funke Kupper, who left Tabcorp last June to become chief executive of the Australian Securities Exchange, said he would ''not be commenting on any issues related to the casino business of Echo Entertainment, which is a stand-alone public company''.

A Tabcorp spokesman declined to comment on the investigation and recommendations. ''Tabcorp demerged its casinos business last year and has not, and does not, comment on matters that relate to it,'' he said.

Mr Mullin and Mr Vaikunta were brought in by Tabcorp from Atlantic City in late 2009 to take control of the $850 million redevelopment of Star City casino and oversee its relaunch as The Star last October.

It was reported that the arrival of the US executives led to a radical culture change at the casino, resulting in an exodus of senior Australian management.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/casino-bosses-warned-of-staff-drug-culture-20120206-1r1x6.html#ixzz1ledjM0La

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Lung cancer among women to quadruple by 2040: study

http://health.ninemsn.com.au/healthnews/8563637/lung-cancer-among-women-to-quadruple-by-2040-study

Lung cancer rates will rise 35 times faster in women than in men in the next 30 years, according to a UK study.

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Smacking increases cancer risk in kids

http://aww.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8563636

British researchers found that striking, or even raising your voice, at youngsters causes them stress, which can have the same long-term impact as serious physical and emotional abuse and trauma.

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We are clueless about safe alcohol intake

We are clueless about safe alcohol intake | Year 9 journal pe | Scoop.it

ONLY 5 per cent of Australians are able to identify safe drinking levels and young people particularly think they can drink far more than is good for them, a national survey shows.

The Centre for Alcohol Policy Research has found that, apart from the 95 per cent of people unable to say what are safe drinking levels, 50 per cent could not even give an estimate of hazard-free alcohol intake.

The centre's study, based on a fresh analysis of results from official surveys undertaken over the past five years, reflects a failure to promote safe drinking guidelines but may also stem from confusion between the guidelines and drink-driving limits, the survey researcher, Michael Livingston, said.

The national safe drinking guidelines - declared in 2009 - state that men and women can imbibe two drinks a day without adversely affecting their health and on special occasions up to four drinks over six hours.

The broad recommendation to those wishing to keep their alcohol level under the .05 drink-drive laws is two standard drinks in the first hour and one drink an hour thereafter.

Mr Livingston said the misconceptions about safe drinking were sharply pronounced among young people.

Young people overestimated the number of standard drinks they could have without exposing themselves to the risk of short-term harm. Males aged 14 to 19 years estimated 8.8 drinks was a safe limit, while their female counterparts estimated 6.5 drinks, Mr Livingston said.

Big drinkers were even less likely to give an accurate view. People who consumed more than 11 drinks a day were more likely to overestimate the number of drinks they could consume in one session without raising risk of short-term harm. Men in this category thought 9.2 drinks was a safe limit, while women put it at 5.9 drinks.

Overall, 21.1 per cent of males and 14.9 per cent of females accurately estimated that they should take no more than two drinks a day to reduce the risk of long-term harm to their health. Only 6.4 per cent of males and 8.2 per cent of females accurately said they should drink no more than four drinks in a sitting to reduce the risk of short-term harm.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/we-are-clueless-about-safe-alcohol-intake-20120305-1uecw.html#ixzz1oIGlueVi

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