Year 12 Language & Literature
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Creating a Critical Thinking Culture | ThinkWatson.com

Creating a Critical Thinking Culture | ThinkWatson.com | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Creating a Critical Thinking Culture

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What Does the Fox Say? B2B Companies Need Visual Style

What Does the Fox Say? B2B Companies Need Visual Style | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it

As storytelling becomes more and more part of marketing, another trend has come into focus: Brands are becoming more visual.

 

... It underscores a point we made in Content Rules about the opportunity of e-books (quoting Jonathan Kranz):

 

"What’s the difference between an e-book and a white paper? A white paper is a guy in a grey flannel suit: a man of stature who wants to establish authority by demonstrating what he knows in a formal manner. The e-book, meanwhile, is the colleague in a Hawaiian shirt who sits next to you at the bar, eager to share insights hard won through experience"....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 22, 2014 9:52 AM

Ann Handley shares good case study in visual business storytelling.

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How Robots Will Change the World - BBC Documentary

This video is for educational purposes only. I did not make this film, i am uploading it for educational purposes. The audio in this clip is for educational ...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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XYEYE's curator insight, November 2, 2013 5:17 PM
If you read Sci Fi or do robotics you already know this!
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The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know

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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:25 PM

This article is part of a larger, on-going effort to help connect teachers and other learning professionals with the neuroscience of learning.

Moses B. Tambason's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:40 PM

More people are running to charity tube to post free videos and watch free videos than posting on you tube. Try posting at charity tube and you will never leave. http://www.africatube.net/ More visitors and more video views. Don't take our word for it, try it. Post one same video on youtube and put it on  http://www.africatube.net/ and return ater five hours and compare the viewers rate and decide for yourself. Create your very own group or forum and control who watch it and invite everyone to watch the video. Above all, post video in English or in any language and viewers can watch video description in their own language. Try it and let us know your experience. Above all it is absolutely free like youtube

Vincent Munch's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:51 PM

Something we should all read

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Hugh Laurie: the British accent vs the American

The fantastically talented Hugh Laurie paid a house call to Ellen, and they played an exciting game of American slang versus English slang -- and the game wa...
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History of Day of the Dead & the Mexican Sugar Skull Tradition

History of Day of the Dead & the Mexican Sugar Skull Tradition | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Beautifully illustrated history of Day of the Dead / Dia de los Muertos and the Mexican sugar skull tradition by Angela Villalba, creator of the original sugar skull molds.
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Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.

Via Seth Dixon
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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

 

So few of my students have actual experience working on a farm and being part of the food producing process.  This gallery of 38 photos around the world is a great visual to reinforce how important the harvest is for sustaining life on this planet.  The picture above shows the a Hmong hill tribe woman harvesting a rice terrace field at Mu Cang Chai district, northern Vietnamese province of Yen Bai. The World Bank on Oct. 7 lowered its 2013 growth forecast for East Asian developing countries to 7.1 percent and warned that a prolonged US fiscal crisis could be damaging to the region.

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, landscape, images.

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Salem Witch Trials Podcast

Salem Witch Trials Podcast | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2013 3:02 PM

With Halloween right around the corner, the Salem Witch trials loom large in the collective American psyche.  While many emphasize the supernatural and the scandalous, this Maps 101 podcast (based on the article written by Julie Dixon and yours truly) gives the geographic and historic context to understand the tragedy of the 1692 witch trials.


Tags: seasonal, historical, colonialism.

Mohamed Maktoub's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:20 AM

لوحة  عظيمة  مثل صاحبها 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:37 PM

The outbreak of the Salem Witch Trials really are really something that produces many questions. Perhaps the most obvious question is why did these trials happen all of a sudden? A community largely based off of agriculture produces an atmosphere of superstition. This can be seen in the events that led up to the Salem witch trials. With the land barely producing enough to sustain the town, people look for a scapegoat to blame. Neighbors turned on neighbors in order to obtain more land claiming that each other were witches. It is interesting to see that in a time of crisis one can a helping hand is not always the popular choice; as seen in the Salem Witch Trials the opposite extreme is taken place. 

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Popular media and cultural identity in the Eastern Caribbean

Popular media and cultural identity in the Eastern Caribbean | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it

Piece on the relationship between communication and power, media and cultural identities in postcolonial era.


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Literature

After Canaan: Essays on Race, Writing, and Region by Wayde Compton All o' We is Me: Mixed Race Identity in the Caribbean-Canadian Cont...

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1804CaribVoices: COLONIALISM AND NEO-COLONIALISM IN THE CARIBBEAN

1804CaribVoices: COLONIALISM AND NEO-COLONIALISM IN THE CARIBBEAN | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it

The contemporary Caribbean[1] is one of the most politically fragmented regions for its size on earth; and one with the strongest remaining colonial presence. Political divisions and external control are major blocs to the consolidation of a Caribbean identity and the charting of an independent course of development in the interest of Caribbean peoples.


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A banned book is back on the shelves in North Carolina after national outcry - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)

A banned book is back on the shelves in North Carolina after national outcry - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog) | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
A banned book is back on the shelves in North Carolina after national outcry
Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Davis said "Invisible Man" reflects the culture in our history and "makes students think.
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Thousands of minority languages threatened by assimilation, conflict and forced displacement – UN exper

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

GENEVA (12 March 2013) – The United Nations Independent Expert on minority issues, Rita Izsák, today warned that half of the world’s estimated 6,000 plus languages will likely die out by the end of the century, and urged world governments to take significant and urgent efforts to protect both minority communities and their language heritage.

“Some groups are vulnerable to factors beyond their control, such as policies of assimilation that promote dominant national or official languages, the impact of conflict, or forced displacement from their traditional lands,” Ms. Izsák said during the presentation of her latest report* to the UN Human Rights Council. “Some countries have aggressively promoted a single national language as a means of reinforcing sovereignty, national unity and territorial integrity.”

The human rights expert noted that minority language rights and language use have frequently been a source of tensions, both between and within States. “Proponents of linguistic rights have sometimes been associated with secessionist movements or have been seen as a threat to the integrity or unity of a State,” she said.

“Language is a central element and expression of identity and of key importance in the preservation of group identity,” Ms. Izsák underlined. “Language is particularly important to linguistic minority communities seeking to maintain their distinct group and cultural identity, sometimes under conditions of marginalization, exclusion and discrimination.”

In her view, protection of linguistic minority rights is a human rights obligation and an essential component of good governance, efforts to prevent tensions and conflict, and the construction of equal and politically and socially stable societies. “To create unity in diversity requires dialogue with all stakeholders, including on how to appropriately accommodate the language needs and rights of all groups,” she said.

“Where conflicts have ceased or peace building initiatives are under way, it is essential that all groups in society play a full role in discussions, negotiations and decision-making processes,” the UN Independent Expert recommended.

According to the Independent Expert, historical factors such as colonialism have had a huge global impact on languages, resulting in the marginalization of and a rapid decline in the use of indigenous and minority languages which were often seen as backwards, a barrier to colonial hegemony, or as slowing national development.

“It can also be argued that today globalization, the growth of the Internet and web-based information is having a direct and detrimental impact on minority languages and linguistic diversity, as global communications and marketplaces require global understanding,” she said.

In her report, Ms. Izsák analyses various threats to the existence of minority languages and linguistic minorities, the importance of recognition of minority languages and linguistic rights, the use of minority languages in public life, education, in the media, in public administration and judicial fields, minority-language use in names, place names and public signs, participation in economic and political life and the need for provisions of information and services in minority languages.


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The Decline of Critical Thinking » Counterpunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names

The Decline of Critical Thinking » Counterpunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
The Decline of Critical Thinking

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Turn Your Social Media into an Infographic

Turn Your Social Media into an Infographic | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Mapping our Twitter connections into an awesome infographic by vizify.com connections.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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JoAnne Reed's curator insight, October 26, 2013 1:42 PM

Help for sharing the joy and possibilities of Twitter.

Fabiola Hermosilla Alegria's curator insight, October 27, 2013 8:32 AM

good!!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 28, 2013 8:59 PM

Sounds just dandy. I love Infographics. I would also like to learn more about vizify.com connections.

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Why the Largest Social Network in 2015 Won't be Facebook, and Will Be From Asia

Why the Largest Social Network in 2015 Won't be Facebook, and Will Be From Asia | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Image: lumaxart/Flickr We're all familiar with the major social networks in the U.S.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The history of the English language in 100 places - Telegraph

The history of the English language in 100 places - Telegraph | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
A project tells the story of the English language through 100 locations, starting in Suffolk and ending in Vienna - with stops in Hastings, Beijing and the moon along the way
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Halloween and Galan Gaeaf; Welsh Halloween tales and traditions

Halloween and Galan Gaeaf; Welsh Halloween tales and traditions | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Veritas discuss Galan Gaeaf and Welsh Halloween tales and tranditions. Contact us today: info@helloveritas.com / +44 (0)800 8600 674
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Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling--Visualized

Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling--Visualized | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
See the rules that make up the Pixar playbook as image macros.

Via Mark Strozier
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Nat Sones's curator insight, October 16, 2013 9:22 AM

Everything we do and say is story. All standard story structures ask the question 'who am I?' and try to make the answer interesting - or we stop caring. The rules here contain some great visuals and a lot of thought-provoking ideas. Go be provoked. 

Darren R. W. Chick's curator insight, October 18, 2013 10:16 AM

Through 22 Pixar moments, I'm reminded of Steven Covey's 7 Habits ... do you see the similarities?

flea palmer's curator insight, October 29, 2013 10:43 AM

Excellent advice for composing an engaging story from Pixar

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The End of the Nation-State?

The End of the Nation-State? | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
With rapid urbanization under way, cities want to call their own shots. Increasingly, they can.

Via Seth Dixon
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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:01 AM

The end of Soverign nation states has alot to do with how interact with other states into a more integrated regional economy. The global community is realizing its importance of woking together to mazimize on trade and technology building as an economic world effort. This would blur the lines of independent soverign countires and bring regions together for economic puprposes even redrawing regional lines. Cities want more autonomy on responding to urbanization and move more away from being identified as a nation state. It is the desire to listen less to what washington has to say and act more as an independent state which makes more decisons with the regions around it to mazimize on rapid city growth and the money making opportunities that a re created from a rapidly changing global community.

Keileem's comment, October 17, 2013 3:41 PM
Just end reading a book: the end of the nation state, but than in mind a non-democratic eu government.
Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:31 AM

Good examples: NYC, Washington DC, Brasilia, Hong Kong, London, and many more.

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Tribal identity vanishing fast - Thought Leader

Tribal identity vanishing fast - Thought Leader | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Tribal identity vanishing fast
Thought Leader
Agang SA leader Mamphela Ramphele has reportedly accused the government of sponsoring tribalism to divide the country.
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Forbes: Gender Identity in Jamaica - Caribbean Journal

Forbes: Gender Identity in Jamaica - Caribbean Journal | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Forbes: Gender Identity in JamaicaCaribbean JournalThe following is the third excerpt in Caribbean Journal from Marcia Forbes' book, Music, Media & Adolescent Sexuality in Jamaica .

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Black dolls come of age in an industry plagued by racial prejudice

Black dolls come of age in an industry plagued by racial prejudice | Year 12 Language & Literature | Scoop.it

Black dolls come of age in an industry plagued by racial prejudice
From the golliwog to Barbie, black toys have a troubled past. The new Rooti dolls aim to foster a renewed sense of pride

Afua Hirsch, West Africa correspondent
guardian.co.uk, Friday 5 October 2012 17.43 BST

The Rooti dolls are said to to be the first fashion dolls to speak languages from countries ranging from Ghana to Zimbabwe. Photograph: Rooti Creations
We've come a long way since the golliwog, right? These days there are black dolls in every toy shop. Tesco might be known for selling black dolls for the wrong reason – pricing black versions £1 cheaper than almost identical white dolls – but the fact that they sell black dolls is progress in itself.

That is, until you look at the black dolls that are on the market a little more deeply. Black Barbieland is a pretty scary place. Chandra, Zahara, Trichelle and Janessa inhabit a world of long weaves, stick-thin thighs, facial features that are barely distinguishable from their white counterparts – except for the fact that they are painted brown – and their only concession to so-called black culture is a one-dimensional version of ghetto-bling.

Their whole range is named So In Style, which to cynics like me raises the immediate prospect that black people are having a Mattel moment in the limelight before proceeding to go back out of style some time soon. In this context, Rooti dolls caught my attention. These dolls, created by the UK-based Nigerian entrepreneur Chris Chidi Ngoforo, claim to be the first fashion dolls to speak African languages, and are designed to help the western children of African parents to stay in touch with their African heritage.

"The whole idea of Rooti dolls is to create that early interest in our children in their own culture, an appreciation of where they come from, and to improve their own self-esteem," says Ngoforo.

"Many people told us that the existing black dolls on the market look like a white doll painted black," Ngoforo adds. "Our dolls are created as a real image and identity of us as black people – African, African-Caribbean and African-American. They have wider noses, fuller lips, long curly hair and they come in various shades of black."

Don't get me wrong, Rooti dolls are not perfect. They too are rocking the weave, with long hair that most black girls could only achieve by buying hair extensions, not helped by the fact that one of the dolls has dark blonde hair.


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Jamaicanize - Jamaican Dictionary and Patwa Translator

Jamaicanize is an easy to use Jamaican Dictionary and Patwa Translator.

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