WWI Propaganda Posters
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WWI Propaganda Posters
Drawing attention to how images can effect and persuade our way of thinking, this collection of posters sheds light how imagery was used in america during WWI.
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What is Propaganda?

This podcast takes a look at three of the most common propaganda techniques as they are used by advertising and in the media. 

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Beat back the Hun with Liberty Bonds

Beat back the Hun with Liberty Bonds | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

"Hun" was a derogatory term used by the British and Americans to describe German soldiers during the First World War. In this poster, a German soldier with menacing eyes and bloody fingers looms across the Atlantic.

 

Artist: F. Strothmann, 1918

 

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Back our girls over there

Back our girls over there | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

The army also hired women to serve as telephone operators overseas, as this poster shows. The United War Work Campaign was a combined effort of several organizations, including the Y.W.C.A., to raise money for the war.

 

Artist: Clarence F. Underwood, 1918.

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I want you for U.S. Army : nearest recruiting station.

I want you for U.S. Army : nearest recruiting station. | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

Uncle Sam points at the viewer. Half-length portrait of Uncle Sam, pointing at the viewer as part of the United States government effort to recruit soldiers.

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On which side of the window are you?

On which side of the window are you? | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

Men who stayed safe at home would be left out of the glory. Here, a man stays safe inside, left in the shadows, while victorious soldiers parade outside his window.

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Boys and girls! You can help your Uncle Sam win the war

Boys and girls! You can help your Uncle Sam win the war | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

Children couldn’t afford liberty bonds, but to encourage them to support the war, the government sold war savings stamps worth 10 cents and 25 cents. Like war bonds, the stamps paid interest. In this poster, Uncle Sam teaches children a lesson not only about patriotism but about the importance of saving.

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Pershing's crusaders.

Pershing's crusaders. | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

In the foreground is an image of General Pershing on horseback, leading his troops. Two soldiers behind him hold flags: a U.S. flag and a red flag with a gold emblem

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Little Americans, do your bit. Leave nothing on your plate

Little Americans, do your bit. Leave nothing on your plate | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

Even the smallest children were enlisted in the war effort. Wheat was needed for soldiers, and so children (and their mothers) were encouraged to eat other grains such as oatmeal, corn, and rice — and were reminded, like children everywhere, to clean their plates.

 

Artist: Cushman Parker, 1917.

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Our greatest mother - JOIN!

Our greatest mother - JOIN! | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

Women who wanted to play a more active role could serve as nurses. This poster showed nursing as the natural extension of motherhood. A Red Cross nurse, “our greatest mother,” shelters a young girl from the war raging in the background.

 

Artist: Poster by: Cornelius Hicks / American Lithographic Co. Inc.

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Don't read American history — MAKE IT!

Don't read American history — MAKE IT! | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

College students were encourage to enlist, as well. Here a sailor tells a young man in a suit, “Don’t read American history — make it!”

 

Artist: Poster by: James Montgomery Flagg, 1917

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His Liberty Bond, paid for in full.

His Liberty Bond, paid for in full. | WWI Propaganda Posters | Scoop.it

This poster played more vividly on the guilt of people on the home front. “This boy has made his last great sacrifice,” the caption reads. “Are we, as Americans, doing our part?”

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