Writing about Life in the digital age
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Between a quarter and a third of everything on the web is copied from somewhere else

Between a quarter and a third of everything on the web is copied from somewhere else | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

There’s a lot of junk on the web. There is also a lot of good stuff on the web. And then there is the stuff that’s been lifted from the good and dropped amid the dross—the aggregation, the block-quotes, the straight-off copy-paste jobs.


The extent of that duplication now has a number: according to Matt Cutts, a long time Google search engineer who developed Google’s family-friendly “SafeSearch” filter and who now leads Google’s web spam team, “something like 25% or 30% of the web’s content is duplicate content.”


That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Not all of the duplication is plagiarized or hastily created traffic-seeking junk. Examples of inoffensive duplication include quotes from blogs that link back to the original blog, or the thousands of pages of technical manuals scattered across the web that are updated with small changes but remain largely the same..


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Yes, we have become the copy-paste generation because of the Internet! This, in itself makes it necessary to avoid plagiarism! A number of Universities in the US have disqualified researches that have had plagiarism issues.
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:47 AM

Fascinating research and interesting reading for all content producers.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 19, 2013 5:44 AM

25%-30% sometimes seems low; but then again, I do hate to find some splogger with my stuff so my ire may seem to weight those numbers.

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What Early Blended Learning Pioneers Got Right That Today's Schools Have Forgotten 

What Early Blended Learning Pioneers Got Right That Today's Schools Have Forgotten  | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"When I first began blending digital and face-to-face learning, it was easy enough to create a flow between online learning spaces and offline learning. However, I noticed that sometimes my students were not getting as much out of the digital learning platform as I had anticipated. This was especially true when students could rush through their tasks, consuming content without real understanding or application of learning. Instead of trying to learn, they were racing to be done."


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Why digital strategies fail | McKinsey & Company

Why digital strategies fail | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Most digital strategies don’t reflect how digital is changing economic fundamentals, industry dynamics, or what it means to compete. Companies should watch out for five pitfalls.

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4 Ways To Leverage Big Data In Education

4 Ways To Leverage Big Data In Education | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"Modern tools for eCourse production and LMS delivery platforms provide a plethora of data that can have an invaluable influence on a publisher’s product line. Consumer product companies have long been monitoring such streams of data; now, leveraging Big Data has also found its place in digital publishing. Big Data analysis should be publisher’s day-to-day work, as it allows for multiple small-scale case studies leading to constant improvement. This is a chance to understand users and properly meet their needs and expectations."


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Can Learning Management Systems Help Student-Led Learning?

Can Learning Management Systems Help Student-Led Learning? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"The truth is, most educators face an innovation stand-off between the naysayers who fear change, regardless of the latest research on the future world of work and personalized learning benefits. We need good learning management systems to help navigate scaling implementation for the masses."


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Review: Google’s Tiny New Camera Uses AI to Become Your Personal Photographer 

Review: Google’s Tiny New Camera Uses AI to Become Your Personal Photographer  | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

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Will Artificial Intelligence Disrupt Higher Education?

Will Artificial Intelligence Disrupt Higher Education? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"Artificial intelligence (AI) is changing the landscape of higher education. According to Dr. Keng Siau, artificial intelligence will “perform an array of general tasks with consciousness, sentience and intelligence.” That could mean that higher education may no longer be the path to a professional career. University degrees have always led to professional careers; AI may change that path and offer new forms of learning."


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It’s Official: Playing Video Games Reduces Stress Both at Home and at Work 

It’s Official: Playing Video Games Reduces Stress Both at Home and at Work  | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

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chase naugle's curator insight, March 14, 3:39 PM

A new study from the U.K. may prove that playing video games can both reduce stress at home and at work. It actually found that playing video games helps young people better cope with stress and life. Video games help in many ways. For some it helps them with problem solving, others it helps them meet friends, something they couldn't do outside of gaming. Video games is looked down upon by parents and lawmakers, but truly they have a good intention to the public. 

 

As a fellow gamer I agree that video games do help with life. After a longs day work or a long day at school, sitting down and enjoying yourself while playing video games make you feel good because you can just relax and not worry about messing up or being wrong because you can't be when playing video games, they are for fun. It's a fun form of entertainment. For some its an escape from the real world. Video games aren't a problem for people. They are a solution to many problem. 

Dominick Runyon's curator insight, March 18, 5:45 PM

A United Kingdom study of 1,000 gamers between the ages of 18 and 30 was published that gives the subjects insights on why they play games. Roughly 55% stated that playing games allowed them to relieve stress, others said that they felt an increase in their confidence levels. 1 in 5 of the gamers reported a boost in problem solving skills. Some of the gamers also said it had positive impacts on their real lives, 3 out of the 5 gamers said they play so they can join friends and nearly 25% of them said they made more friends gaming than in other activities.

 

I believe gaming has a wide variety of positive impacts but a large impact is the stress relief. Gaming allows a player to escape from the real world for a period of time and not have to worry about the problems they face. It also helps boost social skills due to the growing popularity of online multiplayer, allowing people to play online with thousands of other gamers world wide and even communicate with them. I play games on a normal basis, and I agree that it helps to reduce stress and believe that gaming provides a larger amount of friends due to the fact hat everyone you play with has either identical or similar interests.

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Teachers: Sometimes It’s Nicer to Say No—Especially to Edtech Salespeople 

Teachers: Sometimes It’s Nicer to Say No—Especially to Edtech Salespeople  | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"In my years of selling technology to different industries, I’ve never encountered nicer prospects and customers than those in K-12 education. Teachers, principals, assistants, coordinators, district staff, it doesn’t matter—they’re just plain nice."


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What Will the LMS of the Future Look Like?

What Will the LMS of the Future Look Like? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"Have you ever become frustrated with your learning management system (LMS)? If so, you are not alone. They are not as easy to use as other educational technology products; however, they are essential for the classroom."


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EDTECH@UTRGV's curator insight, February 14, 3:26 PM

I expect the next generation of LMSs will be more social and focus much more on enhancing the learner's experience.

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Group vs. Collaborative Learning: Knowing the Difference Makes a Difference

Group vs. Collaborative Learning: Knowing the Difference Makes a Difference | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
All collaborative learning is done in a group (or at least pairs), but not all group work is inherently collaborative. The trick is to structure the activity in a way that makes students work together to be successful.

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Without teacher guidance, all the tech in the world will be quite useless

Without teacher guidance, all the tech in the world will be quite useless | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"Handing students a computing device and expecting them to teach themselves is the virtual equivalent of being left in such a room."


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3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making

3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

To make a good decision, you need to have a sense of two things: how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes and how desirable each of those outcomes is. In other words, as Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb have written, decision making requires both prediction and judgment.

 

But how do you get better at either? We’ve published volumes on this subject —here are a few of my favorites — but there are three rules that stand out. Following them will improve your ability to predict the effects of your choices and assess their desirability.

Rule #1: Be less certain.

Nobel-prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman has said that overconfidence is the bias he’d eliminate first if he had a magic wand. It’s ubiquitous, particularly among men, the wealthy, and even experts. Overconfidence is not a universal phenomenon — it depends on factors including culture and personality — but the chances are good that you’re more confident about each step of the decision-making process than you ought to be.

 

So, the first rule of decision making is to just be less certain — about everything. Think choice A will lead to outcome B? It’s probably a bit less likely than you believe. Think outcome B is preferable to outcome C? You’re probably too confident about that as well.

 

Once you accept that you’re overconfident, you can revisit the logic of your decision. What else would you think about if you were less sure that A would cause B, or that B is preferable to C? Have you prepared for a dramatically different outcome than your expected one?

 

You can also practice aligning your level of your confidence to the chance that you’re correct. Try out quizzes like this one or this one. You’ll realize that while it’s not possible to always be right, it’s totally possible to become less overconfident.


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A Touch of Business's curator insight, January 28, 4:37 PM

It's the decisions you make in your life that shape your life, why not better undersand the process?

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, January 29, 12:37 AM

To make a good decision, you need to have a sense of two things: how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes and how desirable each of those outcomes is.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 29, 8:15 AM
3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making
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Students Say They Are Not as Tech Savvy as Educators Assume 

Students Say They Are Not as Tech Savvy as Educators Assume  | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"A love for avocado lattes and Snapchat filters are just a few of the stereotypes following Millennials these days. But students are now pushing back on these generational generalizations, noting that assumptions regarding their attitudes, hobbies, and abilities are hurting them academically."


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Rethinking Education — 4 Core Skills to include in the Curriculum

"We’re sure that almost everyone has realized that the education system we grew up with is becoming obsolete. The system that puts much emphasis on memorization and the ability to go about numbers is slowly on its way out. Regular standardized testing, which has become the de facto basis of acceptance into universities and employment, is already outmoded. We’re slowly (and painfully) finding out that the system that equates good academic scores to more opportunities, better career options, and ultimately, a prosperous life, isn’t exactly working. With these realizations of the current system’s obsolescence, rethinking education seems a very viable option to better prepare our children for the future."


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Teach the World to Respect Your Time

Teach the World to Respect Your Time | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
If you don't believe your time is valuable, why should anyone else?

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Kevin Cuckow's curator insight, March 26, 5:11 AM
This article is well worth reading..I have lived and worked in several countries and never before have I been so frustrated as I do now with the Turkish citizens and clients and their timekeeping... Utterly ignorant and selfish and disrespectful when it comes to time and punctuality.

Shubham Chaubey's curator insight, March 26, 9:43 AM

Great article here. I love it. #Know_your_worth

Kami Campbell's curator insight, March 29, 1:38 AM
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The Intrusion of Social Media in Learning

Social media has evolved into a tool for creating and promoting the "self," creating a tension between encouraging individual expression and overemphasizing the self in a collaborative setting.

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EDTECH@UTRGV's curator insight, March 14, 11:48 AM

The word "intrusion" makes it sound like social learning is a bad thing.

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Micro-Learning: Why Aren’t You on the Bandwagon?

Micro-Learning: Why Aren’t You on the Bandwagon? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Micro-learning is bite-sized, individualized training elements that can be retrieved anywhere. Learners can digest the information when they need it.

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Leaders From LinkedIn, Amazon, and Tesla Say These Are the 5 Trends Shaping Talent Development

Leaders From LinkedIn, Amazon, and Tesla Say These Are the 5 Trends Shaping Talent Development | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

While it's relatively easy for competitors to implement technology similar to yours, duplicate your strategy, and even mimic your culture, they can't clone your people. That's why most organizations agree talent is a top priority. At the end of the day, people are your truest form of sustainable competitive advantage. 

 

To expand the capabilities of their best asset, most organizations invest in some form of continued development. Research from the Brandon Hall Group revealed the average training budget for large organizations hovers around $13 million. Also, out of all the delivery mediums available (i.e., mobile apps, simulations, and e-learning), classroom settings are still chosen 22 percent more often than any other modality.

 

This research came as a bit of a surprise, given all the advancements in technology. Although the study also indicated classroom settings were effective, I couldn't help but think that many companies are behind the times. 

 

As a part of the research, Rallyware, a training platform that delivers adaptive learning solutions, interviewed learning and development thought leaders to get their perspective on how technology will shape the future of corporate training. 

Through these interviews, five e-learning trends emerged:

1. Employees will learn on the go. 

I'm not the only one who says yes to projects that I'm not 100 percent certain I can do, right? My motto is say yes and figure it out later. It's risky, but it's also a lot of fun. I can't tell you how many times a YouTube video or an on-demand course from Lynda.com has saved me. 

 

Kevin Delaney, VP of learning and development at LinkedIn, realizes that future corporate training must adopt to these types of situations. Two-day workshops aren't efficient enough. We need access to just-in-time solutions that help us troubleshoot issues within minutes. In his interview, Delaney offered valuable insight that foreshadows future learning tools: When employees are stuck, they want the answer quickly.

It doesn't help them to sign up for a class that will happen three weeks from now and sit through a four-hour session to get the answer they need this minute. They are more inclined to engage in learning if they can watch a short video that they have access to 24/7 on any device.

2. The learning experience will be highly customized. 

Different learning styles and varying role responsibilities are making big-box, off-the-shelf learning solutions less and less effective. Now, customized and concentrated learning experiences are critical. Employees need access to content that's relevant, easily digestible, and engaging.

 

Delaney offered some opinions on how personalized training should be delivered:

 

First, don't bore people. Bored people don't learn. Second, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to learning. Companies need to offer a variety of solutions and focus on creating a one-size-fits-one experience.

3. Learning and development professionals won't create but curate. 

The amount of content on the web is unbelievable. Udemy, an e-learning provider, has more than 65,000 courses on its site alone. With employees' increased access to content, learning is now a dual responsibility. Learning and development professionals can pinpoint key learning areas and vehicles and employees can be proactive about owning their development. 

The days of creating a huge list of internal content are changing, says Beth Loeb Davies, director of learning and development at Tesla:

 

At this point, I believe that we don't need to produce our own content in organizations as often as we did before but rather find the right material and deliver it to those who need it when they need it ... People are already learning through alternative media. Our role is becoming to curate resources in the context of the company culture and people's needs.

4. Employees' job responsibilities will be mixed. 

Many organizations are shifting to flatter and more efficient org charts. However, the same amount of work still needs to get done. It's not uncommon to see employees operating outside their job descriptions. If organizations expect to do more with less, then they'll need to broaden the scope of skills development, says Tom Brown, VP of HR Americas and APAC at eBay:

 

Companies will need to ensure that there are opportunities for their employees to build a quorum of different skill sets which won't necessarily be linked to their job titles. It means that there will be a decreasing emphasis on the career ladder, as we know it.

5. The data-driven approach to talent development will be a matter of course. 

Data is a powerful validator, especially for cost-center functions like learning and development. Now, through advances in technology, initiatives that were traditionally seen as nice-to-haves can produce quantitative results proving their value. HR (the department in which learning and development professionals sit) will have to adjust, says Kvon Tucker, an Amazon global leadership development partner.

 

HR will need to become more data driven ... Learning experience data will be most valuable to companies, to help them track and correlate the most important experiences to the development outcomes needed for the organization.

 

This is a lot to take in. If leaders want to address all these trends, then they'll have to consider new technology including artificial intelligence, data, and machine learning. These tools are giving leaders the ability to analyze individual behavior and then deliver the right content to the right people at the right time on the preferred device. If you haven't already, take a look at microlearning, big data, and gamification to see if they're the right solution for your organization. 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 4, 4:46 PM

Leaders in the learning and talent development space discuss trends affecting the future of corporate training.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 6, 12:40 AM

While it's relatively easy for competitors to implement technology similar to yours, duplicate your strategy, and even mimic your culture, they can't clone your people. That's why most organizations agree talent is a top priority. At the end of the day, people are your truest form of sustainable competitive advantage.

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Virtual Reality Will Turn Kids into Zombies! Just Like Movies, Advertising, Video Games, and Rock Music Did! 

Virtual Reality Will Turn Kids into Zombies! Just Like Movies, Advertising, Video Games, and Rock Music Did!  | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

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Helping Kids Thrive in a Digital World

Helping Kids Thrive in a Digital World | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"Do you ever feel like your kids spend too much time on their tablets, phones, and other electronic devices? Statistics show that children between the ages of eight and eighteen spend more than seven hours per day on screens. Digital technology has clearly become a standard part of our routines and daily lives."


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Teachers want to prepare students for the jobs of the future — but feel stymied

Teachers want to prepare students for the jobs of the future — but feel stymied | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

"One of the biggest questions facing schools right now is how to prepare students for a labor market that could be radically reshaped by emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence. In a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit, a research group affiliated with the weekly magazine, many K-12 educators said they want to retool their teaching to match workforce needs but feel limited by meager budgets and inadequate access to technology."


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4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back

4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Advice on how to improve one’s self is everywhere.  It accounts for about 2.5% of all book sales in the United States. Add in speeches, training programs, TV programs, online-products, coaches, yoga, and the like, self-help is a $10 billion industry per year, and that’s just in the U.S.

 

However, research shows that much of the advice extolled may be misleading or even wrong. Several myths about performance persist, despite research and practices that show they are half-truths at best. That might explain why the most likely purchasers of self-improvement books have bought another within the previous 18 months.  The first myth-riddled book didn’t work, so they bought another, and maybe another soon after.

 

A recent report in the Journal of Management noted that of nearly 25,000 academic articles on performance, only a fraction include what psychologists call within person variance, which describes ranges, such as that between individuals’ top, average and worst performances. Advice too often mistakenly assumes performance can be compared across people, using the same gauge. That’s absurd.

 

Our observation of hundreds of performance seekers largely confirms the report and has led to delineating a series of myths that hold people back when trying to improve. These assertions are based on a diverse set of fields, including psychology, sports, arts, and leadership. We hope that by dispelling these myths, explaining the reality and offering some sound advice instead, we can help move people toward more effective personal development.


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Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 5, 9:00 AM
Start a business at https://goo.gl/4omBU4 which gives you a decent while starting when you developed the business that changes your life into a greater position.
Happy earnings, 
 
Kool Design Maker's curator insight, February 6, 5:06 AM

Our business card producers are outlined pros apply proficient shading plan and straightforward yet valuable textual styles on your Custom Business Card Design services

Kool Design Maker's curator insight, February 8, 8:05 AM

Hearing Aid Repair MN is a larger number of times than not required as a result of individuals who misuse their gadgets

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The 3 Stages of Failure in Life and Work

The 3 Stages of Failure in Life and Work | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
One of the hardest things in life is to know when to keep going and when to move on.

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Daniel Watson's curator insight, January 30, 7:47 PM

 

All businesses have a life cycle, but sometimes it becomes just too hard to take a business beyond the startup phase, in order to progress further along that cycle. Where this occurs, it is important for a business owner to know when to continue to perservere, and when to quit. This interesting article provides some good information, that may prove helpful, if you are ever faced with having to make such a decision.

Kavya Mathur's comment, February 2, 6:21 AM
True and well written
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How to Be a Leader Without Having to Act Like One

How to Be a Leader Without Having to Act Like One | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

It's been largely assumed that to run a successful business today, good leadership is required. But it's not the end of the world for leaders who worry that they're low on charisma or can't stir employees' hearts and minds. Maybe they don't particularly want to, and that's OK too.

 

Sometimes, it's more effective for employees to be more loyal to the work instead of being more loyal to the leader. After all, the end goal should be to keep employees engaged and productive by charging them to solve compelling problems.

 

First, it's important to understand the difference between an appealing boss and challenging work. A recent Harvard Business Review article found that employees at Facebook were more likely to quit because of their work--and not because of a "horrible" boss. The authors--three HR executives and Wharton professor Adam Grant--had spent years studying Facebook. When the social media giant started tracking employee exits, "all bets were on managers," the authors wrote. Turns out, employees left "when their job wasn't enjoyable, their strengths weren't being used, and they weren't growing in their careers."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 29, 8:14 AM
Leadership
Annie Mey's curator insight, January 30, 12:54 AM
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, January 30, 4:55 PM
Well, I am not so sure about this problem-led leader thing but the video at the end is a must-see...:-)))
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The U.S. Drops Out of the Top 10 in Innovation Ranking

The U.S. Drops Out of the Top 10 in Innovation Ranking | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Score another one for Seoul while Silicon Valley slides.

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