Writing about Life in the digital age
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Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Education and Tech Tools
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A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future

A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
To educate students for 21st-century careers, educators should be using real-world case studies, embracing complexity, practicing empathy, integrating technology, and encouraging reflection.

Via Becky Roehrs
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

The classroom of the future is not just about the technology we use, but it is also about creating relevance to what is being taught, by making the topic contextually relevant to life. We are also talking about creating a culture of empathy and respect, which unfortunately seems to be given less importance these days. Also the classroom of the future will be about training ourselves to make best use of technology, as a support system, but not to surpass or overwhelm the the humanness of the students and teachers alike. Most important of all, the classroom of the future will be self-driven, and students and teachers will use technology responsibly.

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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, December 23, 2014 2:15 AM

Of course I agree integrating technology is key for the future of education and the work world.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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5 Bold Predictions For The Future Of Higher Education

5 Bold Predictions For The Future Of Higher Education | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Everything from the emergence of MOOCs to new learning styles and mounting financial and sustainability pressures are impacting the education landscape. Every day higher education leaders are developing new strategies to leverage across these developing challenges and opportunities.

 

The common denominator amidst all this change: students. What should they learn? How can institutions best attract them? How do you best empower their learning? How do you keep them safe? What do they value? These aren’t new questions but the answers are shifting rapidly. The questions are also becoming more critical for our educational institutions given the National Center for Education Statistics report revealing in 2012, for the first time in three decades, demographics predicted a diminishing population for college age students in the United States.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Most of the innovations in the field of education are the result of cost-saving issues, and to some extent  issues related to flexibility and accessibility. The use of technology has made it possible to provide cost-effective learning modules for everyone. MOOCs. are an effective way for online learning especially as they are easily accessible and don't burn a hole in the pocket. Formal courses that require your presence in a classroom over a period of time will soon be things of the past.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:33 AM

The future of higher education is a constantly moving target. What, where, and how will we learn?

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Planning Your Future Is Pointless. The How And Why Of Embracing Uncertainty

Planning Your Future Is Pointless. The How And Why Of Embracing Uncertainty | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

willYou can’t figure out the future.

Even young people who have a plan (be a doctor, lawyer, research scientist, singer) don’t really know what will happen. If they have any certainty at all, they’re a bit deluded. Life doesn’t go according to plan, and while a few people might do exactly what they set out to do, you never know if you’re one of those. Other things come along to change you, to change your opportunities, to change the world. The jobs of working at Google, Amazon or Twitter, for example, didn’t exist when I was a teenager. Neither did this job.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

I guess it makes sense to plan for the unexpected, an oxymoron, I guess, but then this is the fact. In many cases, our planning caters to only five to ten percent of what will really take place. This however doesn't that you don't plan! Having a lesson plan ensures that there will be standardized teaching taking place in the class. A Lesson plan is like a road map that a substitute teacher can take up in your place, and he or she can pick up from where you left. But then coming back to planning, I remember how even the elaborate five year plans made by the government under the Socialist Regime in Ethiopia couldn't account for the lack of rains leading to a drought and famine!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 23, 2014 12:21 AM

Wondering what the future holds is a tough question at any age. Instead of trying to figure it all out, get comfortable with the discomfort of uncertainty.

Sharifah Raudhah AlQudsy's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:52 AM

Totally agree. The 21st century begs for this skill.The skill to embrace uncertainty and be calm in facing change.