Writing about Life in the digital age
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Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Writing about Life in the digital age
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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor, rodrick rajive lal
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!
more...
Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 5, 2016 11:52 AM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

neistersen.com.tr's comment, April 5, 2016 12:05 PM
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http://www.neistersen.com.tr/
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 2016 7:28 AM
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
more...
Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 5, 2016 11:52 AM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

neistersen.com.tr's comment, April 5, 2016 12:05 PM
http://www.neistersen.com.tr/ satılık araba, satılık araç, satılık oto, satılık otomobil, satılık araba ankara, satılık araç ankara, satılık oto ankara, satılık arabalar, satılık araçlar, satılık otolar, sahibinden satılık araba, sahibinden satılık araç, sahibinden satılık oto, acil satılık araba, acil satılık araç, acil satılık oto, satılık araba ilanları, satılık araç ilanları, satılık oto ilanları, satılık araba siteleri, satılık araç siteleri, satılık oto siteleri, ucuz satılık araba, ucuz satılık araba, ucuz satılık oto, araba, araç, oto, otomobil, arabalar, araçlar, otolar, otomobiller, ankarada satılık araba, ankarada satılık araç, ankarada satılık otolar
http://www.neistersen.com.tr/
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 2016 7:35 AM
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!