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These Are The Job Skills Of The Future That Robots Can’t Master

These Are The Job Skills Of The Future That Robots Can’t Master | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

We may live in a digital world, but soft skills like communication, problem solving, collaboration, and empathy are becoming more valued than technology, says Paul Roehrig, chief strategy officer for Cognizant Digital Business, a business and technology service provider.

 

“People skills are more and more important in an era where we have powerful and pervasive technology,” he says. “It sounds counterintuitive, but to beat the bot, you need to be more human.”

 

When evaluating their hiring plans for 2017, 62% of employers rate soft skills as very important, according to CareerBuilder. But a recent survey by the Wall Street Journal found that 89% of executives are having a difficult time finding people with these qualities.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 12, 2017 6:37 PM

“To beat the bot, you need to be more human.”

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Why You Need This One Trait to Build a Successful Company Culture

Why You Need This One Trait to Build a Successful Company Culture | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

How would you describe a superpower in the workplace? Words such as “inspirational,” “influential” and “powerful” would come to mind, but you would rarely think of “empathetic.”

 

Empathy is a skill which is often overlooked in the workplace. Determined by Frans de Waal as the “social glue that holds human society together,” empathy refers to the awareness of one’s own and other people’s feelings, needs and concerns. Having the ability to be empathetic has been proven to prevent poor morale, misunderstandings and conflicts, consequently enabling a person to build significant and long-lasting relationships with others. Empathy therefore is the underrated key ingredient for both personal and professional success.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Empathy is perhaps the single most important trait that goes into a successful company! The expression of empathy, eagerness to know more about how your employees feel, the ability to find time for employees are all things that make your company a great place to work in. Unfortunately, the culture of empathy is the most overlooked one because of the need to compete and produce results. We have become mechanical in our dealings with subordinates and even colleagues! 
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 17, 2017 7:22 PM

Having this skill is like having a workplace superpower.

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9 Skills You Should Learn That Pay Dividends Forever

The further along you are in your career, the easier it is to fall back on the mistaken assumption that you've made it and have all the skills you need to succeed. The tendency is to focus all your energy on getting the job done, assuming that the rest will take care of itself. Big mistake.

New research from Stanford tells the story. Carol Dweck and her colleagues conducted a study with people who were struggling with their performance. One group was taught to perform better on a task that they performed poorly in. The other group received a completely different intervention: for the task that they performed badly in, they were taught that they weren't stuck and that improving their performance was a choice. They discovered that learning produces physiological changes in the brain, just like exercise changes muscles. All they had to do was believe in themselves and make it happen.

When the groups' performance was reassessed a few months later, the group that was taught to perform the task better did even worse. The group that was taught that they had the power to change their brains and improve their performance themselves improved dramatically.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The primary takeover in life is that we should never stop learning. the moment we think that we are who we are is the moment we give away our unrealized potential. In Gandhi's own words, 'Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.'
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 23, 2017 6:15 PM

Some of the most important skills in life are not taught in school. Here are 9 you won't want to miss out on.

Bryan Worn's curator insight, March 26, 2017 1:26 AM

All these skills are learnable, some are hard at first but like driving a car they become second nature when you have enough practice.

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5 Signs Of High Emotional Intelligence

5 Signs Of High Emotional Intelligence | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
 

Emotional intelligence predicts people’s ability to regulate themselves, manage other people, and achieve success. Research shows a link between emotional intelligence and career success. Not everyone is born with it, but unlike IQ, emotional intelligence can be acquired and improved with practice. So, how can we tell if someone’s got it or not? Here are five signs of people with high emotional intelligence. These are qualities that are easy to assess in every day situations.

 

Sign No. 1: They handle criticism without denial, blame, excuses or anxiety.

One of the hallmarks of high emotional intelligence is self-awareness. Self-awareness is a deep understanding of what makes us tick; what angers us, makes us happy, bores and interests us. It’s also means that we can appraise ourselves, faults and all, with great honesty and clarity. So when people with high emotional intelligence make a mistake and get criticized for it, it doesn’t send them into an emotional tailspin. It’s simply a fact to be noted, analyzed and corrected.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
They maintain their cool in the event of a crisis, they manage deadlines, and they are able to rise to the toughest challenges with a smile on their lips. They are professionals with emotional intelligence. 
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Adele Taylor's curator insight, October 12, 2016 7:10 PM
I really like this article, I think personally I struggle with sign 1 and 2 at times.
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Are You Emotionally Intelligent? Here's How to Know for Sure

Are You Emotionally Intelligent? Here's How to Know for Sure | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 percent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success.

 

Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 percent of top performers have high emotional intelligence.

 

Emotional intelligence is the "something" in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions to achieve positive results.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

An interesting article indeed, that tells us a lot about the importance of emotional intelligence (E.Q.). It is clear that a very high I.Q. devoid of the ability and skills requred to live in a world built out of a social fabric of relations does not indicate success! Taken in a social context, I.Q. + E.Q. = Success! And moreover, there is a mathematical logic to the same.

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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, March 27, 2015 7:20 PM

Lots in the article to be aware of, notice and practice...

Nisha Arora's curator insight, March 28, 2015 4:19 AM

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Eugenia Papaioannou's comment, April 4, 2015 7:23 AM
Emotional intelligence is an essential factor in motor learning. Teachers should be aware of this to maximise results in the learning process. Eugenia Papaioannou, EFL teacher, teachers' trainer, author.
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5 Signs You Have High Emotional Intelligence

5 Signs You Have High Emotional Intelligence | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Just how important is high emotional intelligence to business success? When L’Oreal started hiring sales people based on emotional competency, the high EQ reps outsold the traditionally chosen ones by over $90,000. Another company found emotionally skilled sales sold $54,000 more each. If you’re more convinced by research, study after study after study has linked EQ and career success.

 

Which is all fine and good, but these findings are only useful to you personally if it’s possible for you actually improve your EQ.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

This is surely most interesting and of course most informative! Feels good to see some if not all the qualities in oneself! It is always important to know about the emotional intelligence of the person you are hiring for your organisation!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 6, 2014 10:15 PM

A hard look at your emotional skills and weaknesses is the first step to improving EQ, which is highly correlated with business success.

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Without Emotional Intelligence, Mindfulness Doesn’t Work

Without Emotional Intelligence, Mindfulness Doesn’t Work | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Mindfulness has become the corporate fad du jour, a practice widely touted as a fast-track to better leadership. But we suspect that not all the benefits laid at its feet actually belong there. Our research and analysis has revealed a complicated relationship between mindfulness and executive performance—one that is important for leaders to understand as they seek to develop in their careers.

 

Mindfulness is a method of shifting your attention inward to observe your thoughts, feelings, and actions without interpretation or judgment. A mindfulness practice often begins simply by focusing on your breath, noticing when your mind wanders, and then bringing it back to your breath. As you strengthen your ability to concentrate, you can then shift to simply noting your inner experience without getting lost in it at any point in your day. The benefits attributed to this kind of practice range from stronger relationships with others to higher levels of leadership performance.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
How could we have forgotten that Mindfulness does not work without Emotional Intelligence, according to this Harvard article! We bandy the word Mindfulness as if it is a magic word which will help boost flagging employee energy levels without realising that we did not consider Emotional Intelligence as an important factor.
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 10, 2017 9:34 PM

The good and the bad of the latest corporate trend.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, September 14, 2017 1:31 AM

"Mindfulness practice helped an executive become more aware of his own high levels of anxiety. He realized that he had harshly high standards for himself at work, and held everyone else to these same rigid, perfectionistic expectations. By becoming aware of these tendencies, he also saw that while his workaholic ethic had gotten him his position, as a leadership strategy it no longer worked for him."

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The 12 Stages of Burnout, According to Psychologists

Tell someone 'I'm sick' or 'I'm tired' and you're not really giving them much information. How sick? How tired? Do you have a mild cold or a dread disease? Are you a new parent who hasn't slept in months or did you just enjoy the party last night a little too much?

 

Burnout is the same. It comes in different degrees, from your common 'I can't wait for happy hour' variety, to far more serious 'I need to take a six-month sabbatical and re-evaluate my life' burnout. The appropriate response for different stages is very different.

 

So how do you know how burnt out you are exactly? Science, apparently, can help. Recently 99U's Hamza Khan dug up a classic Scientific American article (subscription required) that describes a 12-stage model of burnout developed by psychologists Herbert Freudenberger and Gail North. Here are the stages the scientists outline:


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
As work pressure mounts and the need to compete with yourself and your partners becomes a reality, one is exposed to stress. Burnout is the result of your not being able to handle stress. Unfortunately, employee burnout is a serious issue today. Attrition is the result of burnout. However some corporates will not keep their employees for a long time in any case, so it is expected that employees will leave long before burnout takes place.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 2, 2017 6:41 PM

How bad is your burnout? Here's the scientific answer.

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Using Emotional Intelligence Is A Woman Leader's Secret Weapon

Using Emotional Intelligence Is A Woman Leader's Secret Weapon | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

As an FBI counterintelligence agent, I relied heavily upon emotional intelligence to be successful in identifying foreign spies and recruiting them to work for the U.S. government.

Emotional intelligence is your ability to 1) identify and manage your own emotions; 2) pick up on the emotions of others and manage them; and 3) in so doing, build trust and grow influence.

 

It is not necessarily a skill that people associate with FBI agents. Loud, boisterous, and pushy behavior may get attention, but it certainly does not get respect.

 

Meanwhile, a softer skill like emotional intelligence often goes unnoticed because it is not related to book smarts or a formula that includes aggressive behavior relying upon intimidation to be effective.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Granted that women might have better skill sets in the form of emotional intelligence, men too can develop the same skills through training. It is not surprising that more women are Principals in schools than men! 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 3, 2016 5:45 PM

Emotional intelligence is your ability to 1) identify and manage your own emotions; 2) pick up on the emotions of others and manage them; and 3) in so doing, build trust and grow influence.

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How to Raise Emotionally Intelligent Kids: 7 Important Things to Teach Them

How to Raise Emotionally Intelligent Kids: 7 Important Things to Teach Them | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Emotional intelligence is the prerequisite to great relationships. Here's how to teach kids to develop them.

 

Step 1: To be happy and successful, they need to develop great relationships.

Step 2: To develop those relationships, they need adequate emotional intelligence.

Step 3: To develop emotional intelligence, it helps if their mentors (especially their parents) model good behavior in love and partnerships.

1. Teach them to "turn toward."

Relationships are dynamic. They're made up of an uncountable number of small interactions. Julie and John Gottman, a husband and wife team of psychologists who are experts in this area, describe these interactions as "micro-behaviors" and "bids for attention."


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
There some important things we need to keep in mind while raising emotionally intelligent kids. These things include, helping them treat success without freaking out, making them see that it is not good to tell mean jokes, and helping them understand how appreciating others plays an important role in building trusting relationships. These pointers are as important to parents as they are to teachers!
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 22, 2016 9:41 PM

We all want our kids to be happy and successful, so it makes sense to work backward and figure out how to make that happen.

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What Makes a Leader?

What Makes a Leader? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
It was Daniel Goleman who first brought the term “emotional intelligence” to a wide audience with his 1995 book of that name, and it was Goleman who first applied the concept to business with his 1998 HBR article, reprinted here. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that while the qualities traditionally associated with leadership—such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—are required for success, they are insufficient. Truly effective leaders are also distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence, which includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill.

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rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Somehow, it is not only knowledge about just about everything that makes a leader, it is also about being able to make connections, emotional connections and the ability to empathise with others. Remember, Mark Antony telling the people of Rome  that 'When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept'. What made Caesar a leader of the masses was his ability to connect to the masses!

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Momentum Factor's curator insight, February 9, 2015 4:59 PM

'Daniel Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results.' He outlines them here for some interesting reading. 

Jessica Starkman's curator insight, April 21, 2015 9:44 PM

old but good article