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Leaders From LinkedIn, Amazon, and Tesla Say These Are the 5 Trends Shaping Talent Development

Leaders From LinkedIn, Amazon, and Tesla Say These Are the 5 Trends Shaping Talent Development | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

While it's relatively easy for competitors to implement technology similar to yours, duplicate your strategy, and even mimic your culture, they can't clone your people. That's why most organizations agree talent is a top priority. At the end of the day, people are your truest form of sustainable competitive advantage. 

 

To expand the capabilities of their best asset, most organizations invest in some form of continued development. Research from the Brandon Hall Group revealed the average training budget for large organizations hovers around $13 million. Also, out of all the delivery mediums available (i.e., mobile apps, simulations, and e-learning), classroom settings are still chosen 22 percent more often than any other modality.

 

This research came as a bit of a surprise, given all the advancements in technology. Although the study also indicated classroom settings were effective, I couldn't help but think that many companies are behind the times. 

 

As a part of the research, Rallyware, a training platform that delivers adaptive learning solutions, interviewed learning and development thought leaders to get their perspective on how technology will shape the future of corporate training. 

Through these interviews, five e-learning trends emerged:

1. Employees will learn on the go. 

I'm not the only one who says yes to projects that I'm not 100 percent certain I can do, right? My motto is say yes and figure it out later. It's risky, but it's also a lot of fun. I can't tell you how many times a YouTube video or an on-demand course from Lynda.com has saved me. 

 

Kevin Delaney, VP of learning and development at LinkedIn, realizes that future corporate training must adopt to these types of situations. Two-day workshops aren't efficient enough. We need access to just-in-time solutions that help us troubleshoot issues within minutes. In his interview, Delaney offered valuable insight that foreshadows future learning tools: When employees are stuck, they want the answer quickly.

It doesn't help them to sign up for a class that will happen three weeks from now and sit through a four-hour session to get the answer they need this minute. They are more inclined to engage in learning if they can watch a short video that they have access to 24/7 on any device.

2. The learning experience will be highly customized. 

Different learning styles and varying role responsibilities are making big-box, off-the-shelf learning solutions less and less effective. Now, customized and concentrated learning experiences are critical. Employees need access to content that's relevant, easily digestible, and engaging.

 

Delaney offered some opinions on how personalized training should be delivered:

 

First, don't bore people. Bored people don't learn. Second, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to learning. Companies need to offer a variety of solutions and focus on creating a one-size-fits-one experience.

3. Learning and development professionals won't create but curate. 

The amount of content on the web is unbelievable. Udemy, an e-learning provider, has more than 65,000 courses on its site alone. With employees' increased access to content, learning is now a dual responsibility. Learning and development professionals can pinpoint key learning areas and vehicles and employees can be proactive about owning their development. 

The days of creating a huge list of internal content are changing, says Beth Loeb Davies, director of learning and development at Tesla:

 

At this point, I believe that we don't need to produce our own content in organizations as often as we did before but rather find the right material and deliver it to those who need it when they need it ... People are already learning through alternative media. Our role is becoming to curate resources in the context of the company culture and people's needs.

4. Employees' job responsibilities will be mixed. 

Many organizations are shifting to flatter and more efficient org charts. However, the same amount of work still needs to get done. It's not uncommon to see employees operating outside their job descriptions. If organizations expect to do more with less, then they'll need to broaden the scope of skills development, says Tom Brown, VP of HR Americas and APAC at eBay:

 

Companies will need to ensure that there are opportunities for their employees to build a quorum of different skill sets which won't necessarily be linked to their job titles. It means that there will be a decreasing emphasis on the career ladder, as we know it.

5. The data-driven approach to talent development will be a matter of course. 

Data is a powerful validator, especially for cost-center functions like learning and development. Now, through advances in technology, initiatives that were traditionally seen as nice-to-haves can produce quantitative results proving their value. HR (the department in which learning and development professionals sit) will have to adjust, says Kvon Tucker, an Amazon global leadership development partner.

 

HR will need to become more data driven ... Learning experience data will be most valuable to companies, to help them track and correlate the most important experiences to the development outcomes needed for the organization.

 

This is a lot to take in. If leaders want to address all these trends, then they'll have to consider new technology including artificial intelligence, data, and machine learning. These tools are giving leaders the ability to analyze individual behavior and then deliver the right content to the right people at the right time on the preferred device. If you haven't already, take a look at microlearning, big data, and gamification to see if they're the right solution for your organization. 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 4, 4:46 PM

Leaders in the learning and talent development space discuss trends affecting the future of corporate training.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 6, 12:40 AM

While it's relatively easy for competitors to implement technology similar to yours, duplicate your strategy, and even mimic your culture, they can't clone your people. That's why most organizations agree talent is a top priority. At the end of the day, people are your truest form of sustainable competitive advantage.

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How to Be a Leader Without Having to Act Like One

How to Be a Leader Without Having to Act Like One | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

It's been largely assumed that to run a successful business today, good leadership is required. But it's not the end of the world for leaders who worry that they're low on charisma or can't stir employees' hearts and minds. Maybe they don't particularly want to, and that's OK too.

 

Sometimes, it's more effective for employees to be more loyal to the work instead of being more loyal to the leader. After all, the end goal should be to keep employees engaged and productive by charging them to solve compelling problems.

 

First, it's important to understand the difference between an appealing boss and challenging work. A recent Harvard Business Review article found that employees at Facebook were more likely to quit because of their work--and not because of a "horrible" boss. The authors--three HR executives and Wharton professor Adam Grant--had spent years studying Facebook. When the social media giant started tracking employee exits, "all bets were on managers," the authors wrote. Turns out, employees left "when their job wasn't enjoyable, their strengths weren't being used, and they weren't growing in their careers."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 29, 8:14 AM
Leadership
Annie Mey's curator insight, January 30, 12:54 AM
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, January 30, 4:55 PM
Well, I am not so sure about this problem-led leader thing but the video at the end is a must-see...:-)))
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The Results of Google’s Team-Effectiveness Research Will Make You Rethink How You Build Teams

The Results of Google’s Team-Effectiveness Research Will Make You Rethink How You Build Teams | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

It’s no surprise that Google, now part of Alphabet, loves data, and the company’s execs frequently share the revelations they find, such as their insights on mobile web use. But some of us would be surprised to discover that this unicorn company often turns its eye inward, analyzing information about its people to help improve its operations.

 

A group of employees from Google’s People Operations section, the equivalent of an HR department, decided to complete an analysis to answer one question: What makes a Google team effective?

 

Here’s a look at their approach and the startling revelations they had along the way.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 7, 4:57 PM

It’s no surprise that Google, now part of Alphabet, loves data, and the company’s execs frequently share the revelations they find, such as their insights on mobile web use. But some of us would be…

Jekabs borziys's curator insight, January 8, 10:27 AM
Privātie investori no Cityfinanceshttps://www.cityfinances.lv/privatie-investori/
Tom Wojick's curator insight, January 9, 2:31 PM

Google's Five Dynamics of team effectiveness are applicable to creating effective safety cultures as well. Dynamic 1 - psychological safety is of particular importance because so often employees fear speaking up about safety concerns. 

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Research: Why 70 Percent of Employees Aren't Working to Their Full Potential Comes Down to 1 Simple Reason

Research: Why 70 Percent of Employees Aren't Working to Their Full Potential Comes Down to 1 Simple Reason | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
 
 

According to Gallup research, an astounding 70 percent of U.S. employees are not showing up to work fully committed to deliver their best performance. Adding insult to injury, 52 percent of those workers are basically sleepwalking through their day, and 18 percent of them are busy acting out their unhappiness.

 

So what gives? Gallup has been preaching for two decades that in order to reverse this crisis, great managers (like Google's own) that understand human nature and how to motivate and inspire diverging needs of people, need to be put into management roles at every level of the organization.

 

When a company raises employee engagement levels across every business unit through great management of people, it leads to higher profitability, productivity, and lower turnover. 


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Trumans's curator insight, November 29, 2017 6:34 PM

The salient point here is that firms who ignore the science behind what makes a great manager are those most likely to suffer.

Ian Berry's curator insight, December 1, 2017 4:42 PM
There's a valid point to the research I do wonder though how Gallup has been at this for 30 years+ and yet you would think by reading articles like this that there's been no improvement in things like employee engagement despite all their research they are telling the same story that most people are disengaged from their work which is the reality in some organisations yet definitely not all
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 29, 8:21 AM
Adding insult to injury, 52 percent of those workers are basically sleepwalking through their day, and 18 percent of them are busy acting out their unhappiness.
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Secrets Of The Most Resilient People

Secrets Of The Most Resilient People | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Some people just seem to bounce back from whatever life throws at them. Whether it’s illness, loss, or tragedy, they do the tough work of picking themselves up, dusting themselves off, and carrying on—even when it seems impossible.

 

If you’ve ever thought, “I could never do that” when looking at one of these apparent “superheroes,” don’t be so sure. It’s actually possible to build resilience to make yourself better able to bounce back from even the most difficult times.

 

“It’s the ability to get back in the game after you’ve had some sort of failure. And indeed, we can learn to become more resilient,” says social scientist and leadership expert Frank Niles, PhD. Niles says there are a number of science-backed areas people can address to help them be more resilient.

 

Here are some ways you can shore up your “resilience bunker” to better prepare for when tough times strike.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The most resilient people bounce back from failure, they don't let stress eat into them, and they take the world by the horns!
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Right Step Consulting's comment, November 2, 2017 1:50 AM
Failing is the key to success.
CCM Consultancy's curator insight, November 12, 2017 12:35 AM

Several studies showed  having a sense of purpose beyond your occupation or everyday role  plays a big role in resilience.

Sharon Ruddleston's curator insight, February 7, 12:16 AM
It takes "resilient leaders" to guide your organisation through difficult times. They're the leaders able to remain strong in the face of uncertainty, frequent setbacks and new challenges. Able to lead with calm, clarity and conviction amidst increasing complexity and accelerating change. How? They connect with a greater purpose.
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This Is How The Way You Read Impacts Your Memory And Productivity

This Is How The Way You Read Impacts Your Memory And Productivity | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

It’s no understatement that digital mediums have taken over every aspect of our lives. We check what our friends are doing on the glowing screens in our hands, read books on dedicated e-readers, and communicate with customers and clients primarily through email. Yet for all the benefits digital mediums have provided us, there has been a growing body of evidence over the past several years that the brain prefers analog mediums.

 

Studies have shown that taking notes by longhand will help you remember important meeting points better than tapping notes out on your laptop or smartphone. The reason for that could be that “writing stimulates an area of the brain called the RAS (reticular activating system), which filters and brings clarity to the fore the information we’re focusing on,” according to Maud Purcell, a psychotherapist and journaling expert. If that’s the case, and the analog pen really is mightier than the phone, it’s no wonder some of my colleagues have ditched smartphones for paper planners.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 11, 2017 6:09 PM

Studies show that reading printed material instead of on screens helps you better retain information.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, October 17, 2017 1:54 AM

Slow down and take more time reading the material, and you might absorb the information.

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The 12 Stages of Burnout, According to Psychologists

Tell someone 'I'm sick' or 'I'm tired' and you're not really giving them much information. How sick? How tired? Do you have a mild cold or a dread disease? Are you a new parent who hasn't slept in months or did you just enjoy the party last night a little too much?

 

Burnout is the same. It comes in different degrees, from your common 'I can't wait for happy hour' variety, to far more serious 'I need to take a six-month sabbatical and re-evaluate my life' burnout. The appropriate response for different stages is very different.

 

So how do you know how burnt out you are exactly? Science, apparently, can help. Recently 99U's Hamza Khan dug up a classic Scientific American article (subscription required) that describes a 12-stage model of burnout developed by psychologists Herbert Freudenberger and Gail North. Here are the stages the scientists outline:


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
As work pressure mounts and the need to compete with yourself and your partners becomes a reality, one is exposed to stress. Burnout is the result of your not being able to handle stress. Unfortunately, employee burnout is a serious issue today. Attrition is the result of burnout. However some corporates will not keep their employees for a long time in any case, so it is expected that employees will leave long before burnout takes place.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 2, 2017 6:41 PM

How bad is your burnout? Here's the scientific answer.

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5 Leadership Mistakes Even the Best Bosses Make

If you think your boss is some freak of nature and you're the luckiest person alive, I'll break it to you gently: He or she is human and will make mistakes.

 

The great ones rise up from their errors by A) acknowledging they made a mistake and correcting a behavior (think humility), or B) acknowledging a blind spot that needs to be addressed, then doing something about it.

 

Lets dive into a few prevalent leadership mistakes that even the best and smartest leaders tend to make.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Sometimes even good leaders will miss out on important aspects of leadership. Not coaching their subordinates, not lending an ear, and putting off important one on ones, even if these are informal will affect the quality of leadership. Having loads of work pressure is not an excuse for ignoring any of these five leadership qualities!
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 21, 2017 7:12 PM

They may be great and smart, but they're also human and will make mistakes.

Begoña Pabón's curator insight, June 23, 2017 2:45 AM
una noticia... Tu jefe es tambien una persona humana... y comete errores!
Diana Amaya's curator insight, June 26, 2017 7:36 PM

leadership-business

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The Hidden Curriculum of Work

The Hidden Curriculum of Work | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

What do you do for work? Not, what is your job title, or what’s written in your official job description? But what do you actually do?

 

It’s potentially the most important question you can ask yourself if you care about standing out, staying ahead of the change curve, and continuously elevating your performance to gain access to choice assignments and opportunities to advance.

 

This is because the value you deliver, the results you produce, and the impact you have on others come more often from the execution of unspoken intangibles that are not reflected in your title, job description, or the daily tasks and activities you’re responsible for. This severe mismatch is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the true demands of work.

 


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The hidden curriculum of work, is about what goes beyond your job profile. When you apply for a perticular post, you are accepting two jobs, one is the what you applied for, and the other is the interpersonal work, the hidden curriulum that goes with the post. The post of teaching includes your knowledge of the subject, pedagogical skills and most immportant of all are your inter-personal skills, your life skills, your attitude towards the learners, approachablility...etc.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 9, 2016 6:46 PM

Official job descriptions don’t include the most valuable contributions you make or the complicated challenges you face.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 10, 2016 11:19 AM

Excellent discussion of something that I believe is often ignored and really forms the core of career management.

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4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back

4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Advice on how to improve one’s self is everywhere.  It accounts for about 2.5% of all book sales in the United States. Add in speeches, training programs, TV programs, online-products, coaches, yoga, and the like, self-help is a $10 billion industry per year, and that’s just in the U.S.

 

However, research shows that much of the advice extolled may be misleading or even wrong. Several myths about performance persist, despite research and practices that show they are half-truths at best. That might explain why the most likely purchasers of self-improvement books have bought another within the previous 18 months.  The first myth-riddled book didn’t work, so they bought another, and maybe another soon after.

 

A recent report in the Journal of Management noted that of nearly 25,000 academic articles on performance, only a fraction include what psychologists call within person variance, which describes ranges, such as that between individuals’ top, average and worst performances. Advice too often mistakenly assumes performance can be compared across people, using the same gauge. That’s absurd.

 

Our observation of hundreds of performance seekers largely confirms the report and has led to delineating a series of myths that hold people back when trying to improve. These assertions are based on a diverse set of fields, including psychology, sports, arts, and leadership. We hope that by dispelling these myths, explaining the reality and offering some sound advice instead, we can help move people toward more effective personal development.


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Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 5, 9:00 AM
Start a business at https://goo.gl/4omBU4 which gives you a decent while starting when you developed the business that changes your life into a greater position.
Happy earnings, 
 
Kool Design Maker's curator insight, February 6, 5:06 AM

Our business card producers are outlined pros apply proficient shading plan and straightforward yet valuable textual styles on your Custom Business Card Design services

Kool Design Maker's curator insight, February 8, 8:05 AM

Hearing Aid Repair MN is a larger number of times than not required as a result of individuals who misuse their gadgets

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3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making

3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

To make a good decision, you need to have a sense of two things: how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes and how desirable each of those outcomes is. In other words, as Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb have written, decision making requires both prediction and judgment.

 

But how do you get better at either? We’ve published volumes on this subject —here are a few of my favorites — but there are three rules that stand out. Following them will improve your ability to predict the effects of your choices and assess their desirability.

Rule #1: Be less certain.

Nobel-prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman has said that overconfidence is the bias he’d eliminate first if he had a magic wand. It’s ubiquitous, particularly among men, the wealthy, and even experts. Overconfidence is not a universal phenomenon — it depends on factors including culture and personality — but the chances are good that you’re more confident about each step of the decision-making process than you ought to be.

 

So, the first rule of decision making is to just be less certain — about everything. Think choice A will lead to outcome B? It’s probably a bit less likely than you believe. Think outcome B is preferable to outcome C? You’re probably too confident about that as well.

 

Once you accept that you’re overconfident, you can revisit the logic of your decision. What else would you think about if you were less sure that A would cause B, or that B is preferable to C? Have you prepared for a dramatically different outcome than your expected one?

 

You can also practice aligning your level of your confidence to the chance that you’re correct. Try out quizzes like this one or this one. You’ll realize that while it’s not possible to always be right, it’s totally possible to become less overconfident.


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A Touch of Business's curator insight, January 28, 4:37 PM

It's the decisions you make in your life that shape your life, why not better undersand the process?

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, January 29, 12:37 AM

To make a good decision, you need to have a sense of two things: how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes and how desirable each of those outcomes is.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 29, 8:15 AM
3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making
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How To Stay Healthy When You’re Stressed At Work

How To Stay Healthy When You’re Stressed At Work | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Tis the season for stress. The holidays are crazy enough, but add in year-end deadlines and sales goals, performance reviews, and the news of yet another raise not given, and you can already feel your blood pressure rise. But there’s good news: You can still stay healthy, even when work is insane. It’ll just take a little extra effort.

 

“When stress takes over, often the first things to go are the ones we need the most–sleep, water, exercise, whole nutritious foods,” laments nutritionist Brigitte Zeitlin. “And that can actually compound the issue, leaving you less equipped to handle the stress well.”

 

Here’s exactly what you can do to keep that from happening before work gets really crazy.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 3, 2017 4:53 PM

Don’t let end-of-year stress compromise your health.

Trumans's curator insight, December 4, 2017 4:48 PM

An important message for this time of year...

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, December 5, 2017 12:42 AM

When you’re overloaded with work, you may not be thinking about taking a break. But getting just five minutes of fresh air can calm you–alleviating stress, and giving you the energy you need to get back to work.

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If you want to be like Warren Buffett and Bill Gates, adopt their voracious reading habits

If you want to be like Warren Buffett and Bill Gates, adopt their voracious reading habits | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Want to know one habit ultra-successful people have in common?

They read. A lot.

 

In fact, when Warren Buffett was once asked about the key to success, he pointed to a stack of nearby books and said, “Read 500 pages like this every day. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest. All of you can do it, but I guarantee not many of you will do it.”

 

Buffett takes this habit to the extreme — he read between 600 and 1000 pages per day when he was beginning his investing career, and still devotes about 80% of each day to reading.

 

And he’s not alone. Here are just a few top business leaders and entrepreneurs who make reading a major part of their daily lifestyle


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 19, 2017 5:29 PM

Want to know one habit ultra-successful people have in common? They read. A lot. In fact, when Warren Buffett was once asked about the key to success, he pointed to a stack of nearby books and said, “Read 500 pages like this every day. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest

odbcparrott's comment, November 21, 2017 9:53 PM
Cool
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Research Says Companies That Do This 1 Thing Increase Worker Productivity by 25 Percent

Research Says Companies That Do This 1 Thing Increase Worker Productivity by 25 Percent | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

When we think productivity, we rarely think of workplace design as a major contributor or detractor, but compelling ongoing research shows that it plays a much larger role than initially thought. According to research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, an empowered office environment can increase worker productivity on cognitive tasks by 25%, and possibly more.

 

Workspace design today is undergoing a major creative shift. We've gone from cubicles (people are productive in isolation) to open-plan spaces (collaboration leads to success) to what I believe is the next major step - integrated multi-function design which recognizes that people need multiple spaces based on their ongoing and changing needs within a business day.

 

Instead of looking out across rows of cubicles, today's office worker needs a mix of team meeting rooms, open lounge-like areas, and private workspaces.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
A well-designed workspace can impact productivity. This is true about the colour scheme, comfort level and a relaxed ambience. 
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 22, 2017 6:38 PM

The surprising way companies can boost employee productivity today.

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What Science Says About Identifying High-Potential Employees

What Science Says About Identifying High-Potential Employees | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

How inclusive or exclusive should organizations be when developing their employees’ talents? In a world of unlimited resources, organizations would surely invest in everyone. After all, as Henry Ford is credited as saying, “the only thing worse than training your employees and having them leave is not training them and having them stay.” In the real world, however, limited budgets force organizations to be much more selective, which explains the growing interest in high potential (HiPo) identification. An employee’s potential sets the upper limits of his or her development range — the more potential they have, the quicker and cheaper it is to develop them.

 

Scientific studies have long suggested that investing in the right people will maximize organizations’ returns. In line with Pareto’s principle, these studies show that across a wide range of tasks, industries, and organizations, a small proportion of the workforce tends to drive a large proportion of organizational results, such that:


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Good organisations will continue to train employees to be high potential workers even if there is a strong trend of employee attrition. In many cases, High Potential Employees who are trained well and are leaders without necessarily having titles will continue to drive performance. Such organisations will continue to train their employees to work to their optimum capacities.
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 5, 2017 6:22 PM

Look for ability, social skills, and drive.

Robert Sullivan's curator insight, October 10, 2017 5:45 PM

PureLine works very hard in this area.....our best assets go home every night.......if you run a business, make sure you thank that asset every night.

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This Is The Key To Finding A Mentor At Every Stage Of Your Career

This Is The Key To Finding A Mentor At Every Stage Of Your Career | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

We get it, finding a mentor can be difficult and time-consuming. But when you do find one (or two), they can save you from making costly mistakes that can set you back in your career. Simply put, having a mentor will improve the quality of your decisions and provide opportunities that won’t be available to you otherwise.

 

There’s this idea that that mentors are older people with established careers and well-honed skill sets who provide guidance to younger mentees, but this isn’t always the case. The key to success is selecting the mentor who best suits your needs at any given stage of your career: entry level, middle management level, or executive level. If you’re an entrepreneur or creative person, you can think of these stages as early career, mid-career, and advanced career.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:
They say that behind every successful entrepreneur there is a Guru, and behind every successful man, there is a 'Woman.' The fact is, we all need mentors at every stage of our professional lives.
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 28, 2017 7:48 PM

Your career needs change with your job title.

Merry James's curator insight, June 29, 2017 2:09 AM
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How Employee Burnout Became An Epidemic And What It Might Take To Fix It

How Employee Burnout Became An Epidemic And What It Might Take To Fix It | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

You'd be forgiven for feeling a little burned out from hearing about burnout. For years, experts have been sounding alarms that modern workers are struggling with career-sinking levels of chronic exhaustion and other issues.

 

So when Charlie DeWitt, vice president of business development at Kronos, a workforce management software company, declares that "employee burnout has reached epidemic proportions," you may think you've heard it all before. But according to new research by Kronos and Future Workplace, burnout really is getting even worse and more widespread, and so are the consequences of it. This time around, there are some surprising reasons why—and a few steps employers can take right away to turn things around.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Employee burnout needs to be tackled before it becomes an epidemic. This can be done by addressing work-life balance issues, grievance redressal systems, and ensuring that there are sufficient breaks from routine. Regular chances for a day out retreats where there is more of outdoors activities and less of workshops on abstruse topics will help. The excuse that 30 % attrition is OK is not a good trend. Exceedingly high attrition rates might be the result of employee burnout, and these need to be addressed seriously.
 
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, February 2, 2017 12:05 PM

This is a real issue that is often ignored. 

Jerry Busone's curator insight, February 3, 2017 8:13 AM

Good insight and theres more to whats here. Folks are available 24/7, the vey technology thats made it easier is making it harder . The addition to our phones and iPads have us in perpetually  stressedAND.. and on call and over time you will burn out if you don't control it. "Leaders need to start having conversations around work flexibility with their employees " its a virtual world let them live it , meet them where they are and keep them longer.

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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

The tripartite dispute on the sharingof the waters of the Nile between Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia was an ongoing issue that failed to get resolved for decades. Now it seems the three countries have finally managed to settle their disputes. Earlier there was alot of mudlsinging  accusations and counter accusations, and blamegames where particular countries would blame droughts and other humanitarian disasters on others saying that they had held back the water that was due to them. In a region that is often under the state of drought, jusdicious sharing of the waters of the Nile, both the Blue Nile and the White Nile will help put an end to the suffering of common people!

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 31, 2016 11:57 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 2016 12:19 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 10:45 PM
This article shows how important it is for countries to have good relationships with one another. This is an example of political geography. Diverting the Nile would help Ethiopia immensely, producing electricity and providing a water source. Egypt and Sudan were able to create a compromise and agree to share, and a long dispute is now over.