Writing about Life in the digital age
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Minimalism Is Dead. Hello, Maximalism

Minimalism Is Dead. Hello, Maximalism | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Less is a bore, as Robert Venturi once said.


Minimalism has held a tight grip on the modern design industry for the past decade. We embraced the Apple aesthetic, extolled the logic of Helvetica, and worshiped at the church of Dieter Rams. It served its purpose, most recently, as a correctional to the excesses of the 1990s. But lately, as dispatches from Milan Design Week have shown, asceticism has given way to audacity.


Every April, hundreds of thousands of people trek to Milan for its trendsetting design week, which ultimately influences the furniture, accessories, and textiles that make their way into homes, offices, hotels, restaurants, and virtually every other interior. This year the artistic influences ranged from ’30s art deco to ’70s eclecticism. Designers and manufacturers experimented with digital fabrication–like 3D knitting–and rediscovered artisanal craft techniques, like lacquering, metal casting, and jacquard weaving.


But one thing was consistent: They’re embracing luxurious materials and textures, testing ambitious silhouettes, and piling on the details to yield products and furnishings that are visually enticing and emotionally evocative.In other words, minimalism is dead; maximalism has arrived....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Minimalism is obsolete while Maximalism is the new kid on the block. It is not surprising considering the huge advantage of digital designing, 3-D printing, and the immense possibilities afforded by collaborative designing. The intricacies of Maximalist design can be faithfully created digitally. Digital designing has allowed the artist and the designer to simply follow his or her dreams to reality!
 
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 1, 2017 11:30 AM

Ch-ch-changes. Design keeps evolving and is the end of minimalism near?

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Which Colors Mean Wildly Different Things In Other Cultures? - DesignTAXI.com

Which Colors Mean Wildly Different Things In Other Cultures? - DesignTAXI.com | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

One of the most fun things to do in design is swirling the latest color trends into your work. Color is a fascinating topic, and even a generator that understands color theory has recently been invented. Because they mean different things, companies also actively use color in their brand designs to encourage feelings and behaviors from customers. However, in different cultures, color theory isn’t all black-and-white. 


In this delightful infographic, SilverDoor describes color associations of different cultures, adding contrast to the way you think. Telling a person from another part of the world that you’re “feeling blue” may mean something entirely different to them. Is your favorite color offensive to another culture? Find out in the infographic below....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Strangely enough, colours have different meanings in different cultures! In India, white used to be the colour worn by widows in mourning, while in the West, black is the colour preferred by those in mourning. On the whole, however, most colours have the same meaning across most cultures. Green might be the symbol for agriculture. 
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 13, 2017 1:56 AM

Surprising meaning of colors in other cultures.

Ashley Villegas's curator insight, April 13, 2017 11:59 AM

Really cool... 

Michelle Harris's curator insight, April 13, 2017 1:20 PM

Very interesting article that I wish I had read years ago.  Happy reading....

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These Are Six Communication Styles That Every Single Person Uses

These Are Six Communication Styles That Every Single Person Uses | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

If you’ve ever had a miscommunication or failed to comprehend what someone else was trying to say, it could be that your perceptual languages are getting in the way. Discovered by development psychologist Taibi Kahler, perceptual languages are the different processes of how people communicate. The way people communicate often carries more information than the words themselves, says clinical psychologist Nate Regier, cofounder of the communication-coaching firm Next Element.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Communication is a complex process that goes much beyond mere verbal communication.The study of semiotics, kinesthetics and the use of gestures all of them happen to be an integral part of a system of communication that goes beyond the verbal level.Taibi Kahler suggests that "perceptual languages" are different processes and filters used by people while communicating with others. Teachers and educationists will find this article interesting especially as it helps them understand why some of their pupils find it difficult to comprehend what they think are "simple instructions".
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 11, 2017 6:56 PM

Everyone you talk to speaks one of these six “languages.” Here’s how to understand and communicate with them.

Infra Bazaar Pvt Ltd.'s comment, April 13, 2017 12:42 AM
nice info it is very helpful for communicating with others thanks for sharing.
Ian Berry's curator insight, April 15, 2017 7:57 PM
I believe there's a seventh language although there's no words I call it optimum communication and it's just a look. How do I know my wife wants to go home? It's just a look!
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A short history of 150 years of paper currency in India

A short history of 150 years of paper currency in India | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Knowing that the current Rs500 and Rs1,000-denominated notes are now a relic of the past makes you look at them differently. In one night, what was once legal tender became nothing more worthy than Monopoly money.

 

And yet, the Narendra Modi government’s sudden move on Nov. 08, which preceded the introduction of new notes, was only the latest milestone in the long story of the Indian rupee’s evolution in paper form.

 

For many of us, the old versions featuring Mahatma Gandhi on one side were all that we ever knew. Though the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) introduced an updated version of the notes in 2005 (eventually all the notes, and not just the high-denomination ones), with some new security features, the overall look and design remained similar to the original style, introduced in 1996. These notes were, however, preceded by decades of changes in symbols, colours, sizes, denominations and more—a rich history that harks back to the colonial era.

 

The birth of a paper currencyUntil the 18th century, silver and gold coins were commonly used in India. But as private European trading companies established their own banks in the region, such as the Bank of Hindostan in Calcutta, they began issuing the very first versions of Indian paper notes, which were initially just text-based....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
We have come a long way since the times when the Briish introduced paper currency for the first time in India. Today the pangs of demonetisation of Rs.500 and Rs.1000 denomination bills has shown how dependent we still are on paper currency. Plastic money or electronic currency is yet to take hold in the country.
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, November 13, 2016 10:04 AM

As India moves to demonetize its currency notes to control black Market currency, the history of banknotes in India and the designs are fascinating.

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Design School's Ultimate Guide to Designing With Backgrounds [With Ready-to-Use Templates]

Design School's Ultimate Guide to Designing With Backgrounds [With Ready-to-Use Templates] | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

In order to arrange your design, you need a place to start. Backgrounds are the foundation of your graphics — it helps pave the path to forming a successful composition.


Textures and colors help create depth and contrast, allowing your graphics to stand out and get noticed. Well composed images can help create space for you to overlay text, while visually communicating your message at the same time.


Using a background can help give your designs more context and provide a visual element to help support your content.


Bonus: We’ve designed most of the images in this article as templates for you to personalize! To use them for your own stuff, just click them and they’ll be ready to edit in your Canva account (No Canva? It’s free!). 


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The post contains some interesting design tips on working with backgrounds with some ready-to-use templates thrown in!
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 21, 2016 12:07 PM

Blogging or designing visuals? Learn these background design tips to make your message pop.

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'I Hate Change' And 4 More Mindsets That Can Get You Fired

'I Hate Change' And 4 More Mindsets That Can Get You Fired | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Google is currently testing driverless cars in Arizona. The two of us had lunch one afternoon in Scottsdale and watched the noticeable cars (with their rooftop honing devices) pass by our restaurant. As the car passed we heard a gentleman at a nearby table say, “Not a chance I’d get in that car.”

As unnerving as driverless cars may seem, change can be hard for many people to accept. We often fear the worst — that music videos would be the end of radio, and tablets would eliminate traditional books. Just consider how many people find it concerning every time Apple changes its charging cord on the iPhone. Yes, it’s concerning. But, we adapt…because we have to.

Change, in all areas of life, can be daunting, and especially at work where our natural tendency is to find a groove that works for us. Still, the resistance to change can be dangerous — as the way we work, the when we work, and the things we work on are consistently in a state of flux.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Somehow, the human brain is averse to change, and disruption tests it severely. It will take some time getting used to riding in driverless cars or any new technology that challenges accepted beliefs and norms. To say that you hate change is a sure way to get fired. You need to get over your hatred for change and accept that there might be other ways to do things.
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 18, 2017 7:28 PM

In a world with driverless cars, drone package delivery, and technology advancing like never before, it can feel like everything, especially our work, is changing. But, there are some things that actually never change—like the five mindsets that could inspire your boss to ask you to ‘take a hike.’

James Schreier's curator insight, April 19, 2017 8:25 AM

This is about "paradigms."

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Ten Things Your Resume Doesn't Mention -- But It Should

Ten Things Your Resume Doesn't Mention -- But It Should | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

For fifty or sixty years job-seekers have been taught to write their resumes in the most opaque and unhelpful way imaginable.

Job-seekers have been taught to use terse, governmental language in their resumes, so that almost every job-seeker sounds identical to every other job-seeker!

That's the worst possible approach. You are not a dry, dusty person — you are lively and creative! Why not show some of that creativity and spark in your resume?


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
This is a most important and highly informative write up by Liz Ryan! Resume writing is something we teach at school at the grade twelve level in India as part of job applications. We do not, however, don't tell our students to mention the "ten things" listed by Liz. Most of us professionals would prefer to outsource the designing of our resumes to an expert. However, for those of us who do our resumes ourselves, it would be a good idea to speak with our "own voice" and not hesitate in being "honest"! We are so used to cliches and accepted conventions that oftentimes, our resumes sound dead and boring. I will surely revisit my resume after this!
 
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 11, 2017 7:07 PM

Here are 10 essential pieces of information that do not show up on 99% of resumes -- but they should!

Infra Bazaar Pvt Ltd.'s comment, April 13, 2017 12:41 AM
nice info it is very helpful for job seekers thanks for sharing.
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Why Your Creative Ideas Get Ignored

Why Your Creative Ideas Get Ignored | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

EMany of us bemoan the fact that creativity seems to be in decline in America.Research by KH Kim finds that the ability to think creatively is down among children and adults, which suggests they may be less able to come up with creative solutions to problems. This trend worries those in the business sector and beyond, who fear it could spell disaster for the future of innovation.


But what if the biggest block to creativity isn’t the inability to come up with new ideas and solutions to problems, but our inability to accept and recognize them?


This idea is at the heart of Jennifer Mueller’s new book, Creative Change: Why We Resist It . . . How We Can Embrace It. Mueller, a former Wharton School management professor, uncovers the way our minds react to uncertainty and how that can get in the way of embracing creativity. Her book aims to give us the tools we need to be more open to creative ideas and to communicate them to others....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Has the internet robbed us of the ability to be creative? Why be creative when everything is out there on the Internet! No, according to the article, it is because we are not ready to accept novel ideas that we have turned away from creative ideas. Ironically, the Internet has made us averse to change and disruption!
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 10, 2017 11:16 AM

A new book explains why leaders can be so dismissive of creative ideas—and how to change this mindset. Useful thinking.

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Visual Trap: Why Obsessing about Your Website’s Visuals is not a Good Idea

Visual Trap: Why Obsessing about Your Website’s Visuals is not a Good Idea | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Why do you want to create a site? Is it to deliver good looking visuals to your visitors? No! The objective is to drive conversions, generate sales, improve brand visibility and ensure your business reaches a wider audience.

 

Unfortunately, an unnecessary focus on visuals might see you creating a site that is low on ROI. Your target website visitors are interested in getting more information about your business and its products and services from your site. If great visuals help drive brand and business messaging forward, well and good and that should be their primary objective. If they haven’t been picked keeping the website’s goal in mind, they will just serve to distract visitors.

 

Here are two sites that have made great use of visuals, and they serve to illustrate the purpose of the site. The visuals are arresting but do not distract visitors from what the website is all about and the products/services it is bringing to them....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Are we too obsessed with visuals on our websites that we ignore the quality of the rest of the matter, like the written or descriptive part, or for that effect infographics? A good website will have a balance between the written content and the visual content! I would suggest a ratio of at least a sixty/forty between visual and written content as being ideal!
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 11, 2016 11:12 AM

If you're going to obsess about your website, focus on function, not just the photo.

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Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity

Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

 hDid your boss ever catch you covering an important memo with Escher-like scribbles? In high school, did your teacher call you out for drawing on the desk, your sneakers, your skin? Today, the doodle nay-sayers are being drowned out by a growing body of research and opinion that indicates that connects that seemingly distracted scribbling with greater info retention and creativity. Companies like Dell, and Zappos, and Disney are eager for employees to doodle on the job—they even pay consultants to help them.

"I can’t tell you how important it is to draw," says Sunni Brown, whose creative consultancy Sunni Brown Ink, teaches "applied visual thinking"— a.k.a doodling—to coders, designers, and even journalists. "It gets the neurons to fire and expands the mind." Just why and how this happens is the topic of Brown's recent book, The Doodle Revolution. Here, she shares her doodling "dos."


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Doodling is good, can you believe it! In years gone by, you could be reprimanded by your teacher for doodling in your note book! Research has shown

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Rona Lewis's curator insight, December 26, 2014 12:57 PM

RonaCorp's Imagination Breaks often have doodling as part of the creative process.  Are YOUR notes filled with swirls and drawings? 

Denis Marsili's curator insight, December 26, 2014 1:42 PM
And this is SO TRUE!
Christine Tryba-Cofrin's comment, December 27, 2014 1:27 AM
Thanks for share