Writing about Life in the digital age
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Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Ad Spend Figures Don't Lie -- Print's Worst Days Are Yet To Come

Ad Spend Figures Don't Lie -- Print's Worst Days Are Yet To Come | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

The figures from AA/Warc are in, and as expected, 2016 was a massive year for digital marketing -- particularly mobile marketing. It grew 45% last year, nearly four times the growth rate of Internet advertising. Although the growth of mobile will be steady, it is still forecast to shoot up 30% this year and 20% next. 


That's the headline, but lurking a little lower down we have the demise of print. It's at this point that I know someone will comment about print's many attributes, and as a journalist from way before computer screens brought us news, I couldn't agree more. The trouble is that the figures don't lie. I am not happy about it, and I don't welcome it, but print's demise will only continue, and will likely worsen. Here's why.

First the figures. National newspaper advertising was down 10% last year, and it will be down 7% this year and 7% again the year after, AA/Warc reveals. Regional newspaper advertising was down 13% last year. Yes, there were modest single-digit increases for digital advertising -- up 5% for nationals in 2016 -- but in no way do they plug the gap of larger declines in print. Put it this way -- a 10% drop in national print advertising is very roughly equivalent to a little over GBP100m. National newspaper digital revenues for 2016 were only GBP230m, so a 5% increase would have been very roughly a little over GBP10m. That means, as a very rough calculation, that national print's losses were ten times the size of any digital gain. 


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Unfortunately, print media is dying away, and I am not using a euphemism to hide the fact that print is on its last legs. The article being scooped points out to facts and figures that show a decline in the number of advertisements appearing in print media, and yes, it is dropping at a steady rate. Those of us who have been around for quite some time will be sentimental about the disappearing newspapers and magazines that we were so fond of holding. The fights over who would get to read the newspaper first, or the long hours spent in the loo (because someone took the newspaper into the loo) will all be faded memories.
 
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 28, 2017 4:39 AM

The report notes that regional print results are even worse.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Who (dis)likes advertising the most?

Who (dis)likes advertising the most? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

American adults are more apt to generally dislike (61%) than like (34%) advertising, according to arecent YouGov study [pdf]. In fact, intense dislike (“dislike a lot”) outweighs liking advertising “a lot” by an almost 6-to-1 margin (28% vs. 5%) among the 1,000 adults surveyed. However, some groups have a more positive view of advertising’s likability than others.


The study breaks down its results by demographic group. Some key highlights from those results follow.


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Advertisements tend to be disruptive in many instances, It is not just advertisements of beauty products that interrupt your viewing of a favourite serial or movie , but also those nasty pop ups that refuse to go while surfing the net for important information. While it is true that we can not do without advertisemets because they provide financial support however, we need to find ways to incorporate them in such a way so as to make them less disruptive! The number of American adults who dislike advertisemets is greater than those who tolerate them according to this write up!
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 31, 2016 3:42 PM

Statista tells us who dislikes ads the most.