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How to Raise Emotionally Intelligent Kids: 7 Important Things to Teach Them

How to Raise Emotionally Intelligent Kids: 7 Important Things to Teach Them | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Emotional intelligence is the prerequisite to great relationships. Here's how to teach kids to develop them.

 

Step 1: To be happy and successful, they need to develop great relationships.

Step 2: To develop those relationships, they need adequate emotional intelligence.

Step 3: To develop emotional intelligence, it helps if their mentors (especially their parents) model good behavior in love and partnerships.

1. Teach them to "turn toward."

Relationships are dynamic. They're made up of an uncountable number of small interactions. Julie and John Gottman, a husband and wife team of psychologists who are experts in this area, describe these interactions as "micro-behaviors" and "bids for attention."


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
There some important things we need to keep in mind while raising emotionally intelligent kids. These things include, helping them treat success without freaking out, making them see that it is not good to tell mean jokes, and helping them understand how appreciating others plays an important role in building trusting relationships. These pointers are as important to parents as they are to teachers!
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 22, 2016 9:41 PM

We all want our kids to be happy and successful, so it makes sense to work backward and figure out how to make that happen.

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Why Criticism Is So Tough To Swallow (And How To Make It Go Down Easier)

Why Criticism Is So Tough To Swallow (And How To Make It Go Down Easier) | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
What Your Brain Does When You're Criticised

 

At any given time, brains are subconsciously scanning the world around us for dangers to defend against—ready to launch a fight, flight, or freeze response that will protect us from predators or poisons. But the brain doesn’t just guard us against physical threats. Research has found that it also goes on the defensive in response to things that threaten to undermine our social standing and safety, including interactions that make us feel even mildly rejected or incompetent. Since even being glanced at askance by a stranger can be enough to trigger our defenses, you can bet that receiving critical feedback is pretty likely to spark a fight, flight, or freeze response.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Criticism is so tough to swallow, apparently because our brains perceive criticism as a danger and so it gets into defensive mode! A few of the senior at the place where I work tell others to learn to accept vulnerability without being defensive. Most of the workshops conducted for employees revolve around making them feel comfortable with vulnerabilty. This, I guess is the first step towards accepting criticism without feeling threatened. Being comfortable with vulnerability depends, also to a great extent on developing  a secure environment.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 17, 2016 8:39 PM

We're used to giving "praise sandwiches" a criticism wedged in between two generic complimentsthat give our brains indigestion.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, April 18, 2016 5:49 PM
Definitely worth a read, if you ever have to provide feedback!
resortsindelhi's comment, April 22, 2016 6:34 AM
<a href="http://raftingcamps.in/jungle-camps.php">Jungle Camps in Rishikesh</a>
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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor, rodrick rajive lal
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!
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Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 5, 2016 6:52 AM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 2016 2:28 AM
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
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How To Change Someone's Mind, According To Science

How To Change Someone's Mind, According To Science | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Belief change is a war of attrition. There's usually no one argument that can suddenly get someone to see the light.

 

Changing someone's mind about a high-stakes position is a challenge many of us confront. Maybe your customers have preconceived ideas about your brand or products that you'd like to influence, or perhaps upper management is leaning toward a decision that you disagree with. In order to get someone to reconsider their views, it's important to understand the role of coherence in supporting beliefs.

 

Going back to the 1950s, psychologists have recognized the interplay among different aspects of knowledge that influence our overall set of beliefs. Building off that research, the cognitive scientist Paul Thagard has more recently put forth the concept of "explanatory coherence."

 


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

"Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in." This is a very powerful aritcle that addresses an issue most of us will have faced in our careers and social life. It is simply difficult to change minds overnight, let alon instantly. When I shifted from a school that dealt with traditional pedagogy to one that was one of the pioneers in experiential pedagogy, I simply couldn't take it! The adage, 'unlearn everything' to learn something new, did not work with me for a whole six months! It took about two years finally to make me understand that experiential pedagogy does work, and that students will get to the end point on their own, provided they are given subtle cues and hints. It takes skill and science to convince people to change overnight, and just telling them to 'unlearn everything' might not be a good idea! What matters is to 'sow incoherence', make people feel worse about their current beliefs, supply them with information from different sources that support a change in their beliefs, and yes what matters is to 'address their emotional attachment to what they believe.' It is only then that you might be able to bring about a change in someone's mind! 

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Claudia Pinto Basto's curator insight, March 30, 2016 3:53 AM

Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in.

Terence R. Egan's curator insight, March 31, 2016 1:03 AM

Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in.

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Why the best leaders have conviction

Why the best leaders have conviction | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Conviction in a leader is an incredibly valuable yet increasingly rare trait. It’s in short supply because our brains are wired to overreact to uncertainty with fear. As uncertainty increases, the brain shifts control over to the limbic system, the place where emotions, such as anxiety and panic, are generated.

 

They’re relentlessly positive. Leaders with conviction see a brighter future with crystal clarity, and they have the energy and enthusiasm to ensure that everyone else can see it too. Their belief in the good is contagious. While this might look natural, leaders with conviction know how to turn on the positivity when the going gets tough. Positive thoughts quiet fear and irrational thinking by focusing the brain’s attention on something that is completely stress free. When things are going well and your mood is good, this is relatively easy; when you’re stressing over a tough decision and your mind is flooded with negative thoughts, this can be a challenge. Leaders with conviction hone this skill.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

The best leaders have conviction! The statement is an indication of what the article is about. The ability to remain cool and unperturbed even in the face of opposition and difficulties is a tough skill to inculcate. In any case, I guess, only a few can maintain there cool in difficult conditions. In many ways leaders have to be consummate actors, they don't let their emotions show on their faces! But then it is not just about faces, it is about body language too.It is about maintaining a confident body language that makes leaders be what they are, confident, full of conviction, and the impression of having all the answers to difficult questions even if they don't!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:59 PM

Conviction in a leader is an incredibly valuable yet increasingly rare trait, writes Travis Bradberry.

Manos Makridakis's curator insight, December 10, 2015 6:28 AM

It is not only about faces.. It is about body language too.. It is about maintaining a confident body language that makes leaders be what they are..

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3 Situations Where Leaders Should Keep Their Mouths Shut

3 Situations Where Leaders Should Keep Their Mouths Shut | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Being a leader can be a daunting task. Everyone on the team expects you to know the answer, and rarely can you go an entire day without having to make a critical decision. The toughest part is learning when to speak up, and when you to delegate to someone else. Finding the perfect balance is one of the toughest parts of leadership.

 

For most first-time leaders, it seems that the default is to make a decision even if you don't know the answer. Unfortunately, when leaders approach the problem this way, it can lead to serious consequences. From my own experience, I've learned one of the most important parts of being a great leader is knowing when to keep your mouth shut. Below, I'll highlight three situations where as the leader you should not speak up, but shut up instead. Use these tips to keep your sanity, hold your team together, and be an effective leader.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Yes, these are situations many of those in leadership positions will have faced, like for example having to lend a shoulder for someone to weep on, having to listen to intimate details about marital dischord, or even having to listen to someone ranting at you and even calling you names. However, come what may, people in leadership positions should never share these confidences with others otherwise the consequences can be fatal! Thus if the leader has to be a punching bag, then it would be better for him or her to keep the mouth shut!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 8, 2015 7:54 PM

The toughest part of leadership is learning when to speak up, and when you to delegate to someone else.

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7 Powerful Lessons From TED Talks About Leadership

7 Powerful Lessons From TED Talks About Leadership | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

What does it take to be a great leader? In a fascinating series of talks, business leaders, researchers, a famed general, and an orchestra conductor tackle that question from their diverse viewpoints.

Some of their answers will surprise you. Here are seven of their best lessons.


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rodrick rajive lal's insight:

I guess the greatest lesson for all leaders is to abandon time tested methods that bring about a followership, and instead work on identifying newer, and better strategies of leadership. Unfortunately in times where technology is evolving faster than we are, we need to adapt ourselves to be tech-savvy, which means, you guessed it,  ready for  21st. Century Skills.

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Graeme Reid's curator insight, September 8, 2015 12:13 AM

Some great TED talks on leadership.

Ian Berry's curator insight, September 8, 2015 12:25 AM

In a world of overwhelm I always appreciate list of careful selections. This is one of them

Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, September 12, 2015 4:57 AM

Well worth watching!

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6 Ways Phenomenal Leaders Exude Power and Authority

6 Ways Phenomenal Leaders Exude Power and Authority | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Have you ever noticed that some individuals seem to “own the room” the moment they enter it? Even before he says something, even if nobody knows her, the room goes quiet. Everyone immediately senses “this is the leader.”

 

Conventional wisdom says that if you “dress for success” you’ll have more confidence and other people will sense that. However, if all that’s giving you confident is your suit, you’ll come off like a wimp who spends too much money on your wardrobe.

 

It’s how you behave around others, not clothing, that makes people sense you’re the leader, according to Deborah H. Gruenfeld of Stanford University, whose work was recently cited in the New York Times.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Powerful checklist for would be leaders, but then I guess this was all drummed into us, like when you were told not to lean on to a table, or fold your arms around yourselves. Somehow this is also about adopting the right attitude, stance and just being with the moment. While it is a good idea to plan and strategise, remember one plan may not work for all the situations, be adaptible, be open minded and greatest of all, have confidence in yourself! I have learned this through my contact with students. Students are the best judges of great leaders, perhaps get them to process a checklist which might help you identify the points that make you a good leader, and those that don't!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:22 PM

Make these 6 simple changes to your behavior and body language and people will see you as the leader you truly are (or want to be).

Hanne Alsen's curator insight, August 12, 2015 2:19 PM

1. Own your appearance.

2. Visualize the room as your personal space.

3. Consider everyone else your audience.

4. Keep your arms away from your body.

5. Speak succinctly and don’t over-explain yourself.

 6. Maintain eye contact until the other looks away.

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Stop This One Bad Habit and You’ll Increase Productivity 40 Percent

Stop This One Bad Habit and You’ll Increase Productivity 40 Percent | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

You know that multitasking is a bad idea. You may even know that frequent multitasking shrinks your brain and lowers your IQ. But did you know that, far from saving you time, multitasking cuts your productivity by a whopping 40 percent?

That frightening number comes from Devora Zack, CEO of Only Connect Consulting, and author most recently of Singletasking: Get More Done--One Thing at a Time. In fact, she notes, there's actually no such thing as multitasking. You may think you're taking part in a conference call, writing a report, and texting with your spouse all at the same time, but what your brain is actually doing is switching non-stop among these different activities. That's costing you both efficiency and brain cells.

The problem is, like many things, multitasking may be bad for you but it feels really good. That's because as you switch from task to task, your brain reacts to the feeling of newness with a jolt of dopamine--the same brain chemical that causes heroin addiction.

Fortunately, Zack says, you can get off the multitasking treadmill, and regain your efficiency, not to mention the IQ points you may have lost. Here's how.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Multi-tasking is the bane of the information technology age, and yes it is eating into productivity, quality of work, what all with poor concentration aggravating output. I very strongly agree with the claims of the writer of the above article and hope that all of us can agree that one should contentrate and focus on one task at a time, and not try to work on many! The insight offered in this article will come helpful for students too!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 28, 2015 7:52 PM

Multitasking lowers your IQ, shrinks your brain, and cuts your productivity--and it's addictive. Here's how to stop for good.

wimi-teamwork.com's curator insight, July 1, 2015 12:36 PM

Is this one bad habit destroying your productivity by 40%

Vishwanath Upadhyaya's curator insight, July 6, 2015 6:13 AM

Jumping from one option to another  means, multitasking, our brain reacts to the feeling of newness is like addiction that may restrict our progress and limit our efficiency. there are so many such habits that posion our growth.

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How Do I Get People To Speak Up In Brainstorming Meetings?

How Do I Get People To Speak Up In Brainstorming Meetings? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

We've all been in that brainstorming meeting: the one where you could hear a pin drop, and the white board of "great ideas" remains blank. It's awkward for participants and downright excruciating for the person leading the meeting.

 

Psychologist Art Markman helps us figure out how to get people talking.

 

Dear Tired.

 

I sympathize. Nothing is more frustrating than wanting to get your group to generate great ideas and ending up with a room full of people staring at their shoes.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

It is certainly difficult to get people to open up right at the beginning in a brainstorming meeting. It is alas human nature that determines whether a person opens up in the beginning or almost at the end! The greatest challenge is for the leader to make others open up. Some of the leaders I know start with a warm up session with simple physical exercises, games, and yogic exercises! These help loosen the ropes of inhibition that prevent people from speaking out. But the to say that these strategies are enough would be wrong! It takes skill, expertise and experience in the leader to organise a meaningful brainstorming session.

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Google HR Boss: We Don't Care Where You Went To College

Google HR Boss: We Don't Care Where You Went To College | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

What they should be focused on instead is curiosity, leadership ability, culture fit, and lastly, whether people can actually do the job, Bock said. “That has been one of the keys to our growth, making sure we get the right people in from the beginning,” Bock said. “If you get that right, you hire amazing people, they’ll be fine, and they’ll do amazing things.”

 

Google has learned along the way. In its early years, the company strongly considered where applicants went to school, going after top talent from big-name universities. Then it looked at the data. What Bock and his team found was that there was no relationship between where employees went to school and how those people actually performed in their jobs.

 


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

So then, the college or institution doesn't matter as long as you have the requisite skills to be hired for the job. We have come a long way from the times when graduated from a well known and prestigious college was a guarantee that you would be hired!

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Andrée Laforge's curator insight, May 6, 2015 9:30 AM

La curiosité, le leadership, un fit avec la culture organisationnelle et finalement, à la toute fin, les compétences techniques de l'individu, Voilà sur quoi vous devriez mettre l'emphase lorsque vous êtes en recrutement (Laszlo Bock- Google).

Scott Brown's curator insight, May 10, 2015 4:23 PM

This should be  rewritten truthfully as "We Don't Care Where You Went To College  If You Are Applying For A Rank and File Job!"  LOL

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5 Tips to Be a More Impressive Speaker

5 Tips to Be a More Impressive Speaker | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

If you're a shaky public speaker, your next big presentation offers so many things to be worried about. There's conceiving of and planning your speech, practicing it, keeping your nerves in check, actually presenting it, and dealing with audience questions, as well as any memory lapses that might trip you up.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 26, 2015 5:51 PM

A Stanford Business School professor offers a treasure trove of tips on how to be a better public speaker.

Xe Tải Nhập Khẩu's curator insight, March 27, 2015 1:36 AM

thanks you 

mytourntrip's curator insight, March 31, 2015 5:31 AM

Manali has the twisty Beas River as its eminent centerpiece. http://www.mytourntrip.com/hill-stations-manali

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Stop Distinguishing Between Execution and Strategy

Stop Distinguishing Between Execution and Strategy | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Consider the recent article, “Why Strategy Execution Unravels — and What to Do About It“ by Donald Sull, Rebecca Homkes, and Charles Sull, in the March 2015 issue of HBR.  Articles like this are well meaning and all set out to overcome the shortfalls of “execution.” But they all fail, including this one, and for the same reason: you can’t prescribe a fix for something that you can’t describe. And no one can describe “strategy execution” in a way that does not conflict with “strategy.”

 

Blaming poor execution for the failure of your “brilliant” strategy is a part of what I’ve termed “The Execution Trap” — how “brilliant” can your strategy really be if it wasn’t implementable?

 

 


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Both are distinct and yet complement each other. It goes without saying that strategy precedes executions!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 17, 2015 7:27 PM

It’s impossible to have a good strategy poorly executed. That’s because execution actually is strategy – trying to separate the two only leads to confusion.

Ian Berry's curator insight, March 19, 2015 12:16 AM

I have a totally opposite view What I've learned from my clients doing is that thinking about strategy and execution at the same thing is a recipe for disaster. Sure they're are inextricably linked, They are two sides of the coin and yet vastly different. In simple terms strategy is about how you're going to move from here to there and execution is about who will do what, and when. You need to be well aware of capability when thinking about strategy. Developing your execution plan and enabling each of your employees to create and own their unique piece is a different exercise to creating the strategy which if its to be the right strategy needs employee and other stakeholders input too

Haidee Calore's curator insight, March 27, 2015 11:36 AM

get often get trapped thinking that strategy and execution are distinct processes. Good article to remind us that strategy is really a part of execution. Be sure to read the comments. They are as good, if not better than the article itself.

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5 Ways To Experience Flow And Get Crazy Productive - Forbes

5 Ways To Experience Flow And Get Crazy Productive - Forbes | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

The average person has 70,000 thoughts each day, and if you don’t learn to organize them, they have the potential to wreak havoc on your productivity.

 

When you succumb to the flurry of thoughts running through your head, your mind becomes disorganized, and the more you ruminate on intrusive thoughts, the more power you give them.

Most of our thoughts are just that—thoughts, not facts. When you find yourself believing the negative, distracting, and pessimistic things your inner voice says, it’s very hard to slow down the momentum of your thoughts.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
One has an average of 70,000 thoughts in a day, and to handle all of them is a challenge indeed! In the context of the busy and hectic lives we lead, it is important to be in the flow, as being overwhelmed by thoughts and issues can add up to stress. While it is difficult to slow down time one can atleast try to organise the flow of thoughts. This is an interesting write-up that will help you organise yourself in these hectic and busy times. Organising thoughts in a to-do diary will help a great deal!
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 19, 2016 8:46 PM

Flow is a blissful state of effortless productivity where distractions vanish. Learn how to achieve this state of mind in 5 easy steps.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, April 20, 2016 8:54 PM
Gives a new meaning to staying focused...
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Complaining Is Terrible for You, According to Science

Complaining Is Terrible for You, According to Science | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Why do people complain? Not to torture others with their negativity, surely. When most of us indulge in a bit of a moan, the idea is to "vent." By getting our emotions out, we reason, we'll feel better.

 

But science suggests there are a few serious flaws in that reasoning. One, not only does expressing negativity tend not to make us feel better, it's also catching, making listeners feel worse. "People don't break wind in elevators more than they have to. Venting anger is...similar to emotional farting in a closed area. It sounds like a good idea, but it's dead wrong," psychologist Jeffrey Lohr, who has studied venting, memorably explained.

 

OK, so complaining is bad for your mood and the mood of your friends and colleagues, but that's not all that's wrong with frequent negativity. Apparently, it's also bad for your brain and your health. Yes, really.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Complaining according to many is infectuous and therefore something to be frowned upon. For administrators and those in Managerial positions, emlpoyees who complain are a liabilty because they poison the minds of others. We have all heard about the Pygmallion effect and know that the story that we project is the story that will go around.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 14, 2016 6:23 PM

Steeping yourself in negativity has seriously terrible consequences for your mental and physical health.

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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
more...
Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 5, 2016 6:52 AM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

neistersen.com.tr's comment, April 5, 2016 7:05 AM
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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 2016 2:35 AM
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!
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Why Attitude Is More Important Than IQ

Why Attitude Is More Important Than IQ | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

When it comes to success, it’s easy to think that people blessed with brains are inevitably going to leave the rest of us in the dust. But new research from Stanford University will change your mind (and your attitude).

 

Psychologist Carol Dweck has spent her entire career studying attitude and performance, and her latest study shows that your attitude is a better predictor of your success than your IQ.

 

Dweck found that people’s core attitudes fall into one of two categories: a fixed mindset or a growth mindset.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

This article says It all, attitude matters more than IQ! In a social setting where acceptability is  most important, attitude plays an important role in assuring success, success as in 'social success'! Having a positive attitude will surely benefit those with a high IQ because then they will open themselves to greater opportunities for learning new things. The  reality is that 'your attitude is a better predictor of your success than your IQ"!  

to the article, 'attitudes fall into one of two categories: a fixed mindset or a growth mindset.' Which  one would you chose? A large number of my students would  rather choose to stick to their guns and not accept that theire might be a better explanation for a certain situation.

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scott gillespie's curator insight, January 22, 2016 4:01 AM

Carol's  work on MINDSET is fascinating and offers lots of insights on who to consider for ventures, teams and projects.


"The deciding factor in life is how you handle setbacks and challenges. People with a growth mindset welcome setbacks with open arms."


So consider a mindset where every experience is an experiment you can learn from rather than a personal win or loss.   

Susanna Lavialle's curator insight, January 22, 2016 4:35 PM
I agree, you need to be enthusiastic and curious, the rest will follow
Bill Brown's curator insight, January 25, 2016 12:28 PM

or some time now it has been recognised that IQ alone is not going to make you successful, whatever your field. Today, even academics have to be more entrepreneurially oriented. And if you are in business - then it goes without saying that the it will not be the meek, but the entrepreneurs who will be the inheritors of the earth! 

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Can Networking at the Office Become Too Much of a Good Thing?

Can Networking at the Office Become Too Much of a Good Thing? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

In every office, some employees carry a little more sway than others. Perhaps they’ve amassed enough political capital in the workplace to trade favors with colleagues and persuade supervisors to see things from their point of view. Maybe they can schmooze their way through a sales negotiation or exploit relationships with support staff to smooth the progress of a budget meeting.

Recently, some research has suggested that employees who exhibit this type of political proficiency in the workplace also perform better on the job. After all, if politically savvy employees can network more effectively and rally support across different factions of their department or company, it stands to reason that they also have the ability to exert more positive influence over firm-wide affairs.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

This is an important ponderable for leaders of organisations, Managing Directors and so on.

Too much of a good thing or TMGT can often backfire in the long run! In many cases we have seen it all, especially how employees who have amassed political clout in the workplace might become too big for their shoes and thus enter into a confrontation with their seniors. People in leadership positions should beware of allowing too much of freedom to politically savvy employees. Yes it is true that such people perform very well at the workplace, often getting the work done in time and on time, in many cases they have the ability to cajole, or convince people to buy their point of view, however too much of a good thing in such cases might lead to others being undermined by the kind of success that politically savvy enjoy. Leadership is not only about guiding star perfomers to greater heights, it is also about bringing low performers to an optimum level.

 

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 26, 2015 4:18 AM

It’s generally presumed that employees who accrue political power at work are higher performers. But those who schmooze a little less are actually the best at their jobs.

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Three Ways To Reframe A Problem To Find An Innovative Solution

Three Ways To Reframe A Problem To Find An Innovative Solution | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Reframing a problem helps you see it as an opportunity, and Seelig offers three techniques for finding innovative solutions:

1. Rethink The Question

Start by questioning the question you’re asking in the first place, says Seelig. "Your answer is baked into your question," she says.

Before you start brainstorming, Seelig suggests you start "frame-storming": brainstorming around the question you will pose to find solutions. For example, if you’re asking, "How should we plan a birthday party for David?" you’re assuming it’s a party. If you change your question to, "How can we make David’s day memorable?" or "How can we make David’s day special?" you will find different sets of solutions.

 


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Do you remember that Bingo Mad Angles Advertisement that used to come on Indian TV? Those scientists kept rotating the triangular shaped tortilas trying to look at each corner of the snack from a different angle. Well this article is exactly about what those scientists were doing in that advertisement, namely look at the problem from a different angle. And how do yo do that? Well re-phrase the question, re-think the question, build different questions around the same problem, ask others to frame a question that addresses the problem. Look at the problem from different angles.

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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, September 11, 2015 2:45 AM

To really make this work, add a dose of people who DON'T think like you - those you regularly disagree with, or wonder what planet they are on.  The follow these three techniques and stay open to all the ideas generated.

Ian Harris's curator insight, October 10, 2015 1:50 AM

Brain fodder!

Nancy Barnett's curator insight, October 14, 2015 10:36 AM

I love this idea about "frame-storming". The answers we get do depend on the way we ask the question. 

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How To Make Your Stress Work In Your Favour

How To Make Your Stress Work In Your Favour | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Sometimes, stress can seem like a full-time job. Many of us try to avoid it or, failing that, manage or mitigate it. But, Kelly McGonigal, a lecturer at Stanford University and author of The Upside of Stress, makes the case for embracing the stress in your life.

 

"We have this story about stress that says when stress is present, there’s something wrong with me or something wrong with my life," she says. But the reality is that there’s no stress-free version of your life available to you—it’s always going to be there.

 

Often, the reason we have stress in our lives is because we’re leading rich lives and something we care about is at stake, she says. Constantly avoiding or reducing stress could mean not striving for certain goals or taking risks that could lead to great rewards, such as a new job or relationship.

 

Instead, McGonigal advocates changing our attitudes about stress and embracing it. That’s easier said than done, but following several steps can help.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

My associate Director keeps saying that stress is good, at first I wondered how this could be, but then on thinking deeply, I wondered if there was some truth in his statement. The article stresses how stress is good, and that it is the offshoot of a rich life. Also, stress is the welcome feeling that makes you connect and share, and stress can in some ways be the tonic that does wonders. However this can be done only if we are able to tune in to our stress and try to eliminate the irritants and obstacles that aggravate a feeling of frustration. Also stress is a catalyst for building relationships in life. Stress teaches us to take the good with the bad, to tune in to feelings of anger, frustration, and fatige and learn to balance these with a feeling of elation. Stress makes us more practical in a sense that we know quite well that it is OK to experience failure some times.

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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, August 19, 2015 9:46 PM

Stress is part of being human, and we can have a positive approach to it and utilise the information it provides, or we can have a negative approach to it and end up in a downward spiral....

Ian Berry's curator insight, August 20, 2015 4:21 AM

Some great suggestions to thriving in a world of uncertainty and where it's very easy to feel overhwelmed

Irene Mohloai's curator insight, August 22, 2015 6:51 AM

Something totally unrelated to ecommerce but is essential that we know how to manage.

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The Trouble with Putting Goals Ahead of Strategy

The Trouble with Putting Goals Ahead of Strategy | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Many business leaders subscribe to the classic definition of strategy as a set of actions designed to achieve an overall aim. In other words, they believe strategy starts with a goal. But for companies that have implemented winning strategies, that’s not how it typically happens.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

I guess many of us had all wrong when we put the goal first. Be it business houses, or educational institutions, or even learners, hitting at the goal first, according to the writer of the article, might not have been a sure path to success! Even Bill Gates arrived at the goal after he had made a few attempts to provide an operating system for micro-computers. It was only after a few false starts, one of which was when his software began to be pirated that he decided to have one operating system across different machines with differing configurations. That, I guess was his goal! To have a operating software was his big idea, his goal was to have a single operating system, while his strategy was built through his experience of pushing his product into the market (the piracy of his first attempt probably taught him a lesson in strategy!). The writer of the article makes it clear that the correct path to success starts with 1.Having a Big Idea, 2.Having a Strategy, 3.Having a Goal. Bill Gates is now closest to his goal of ensuring that almost everyother home in the developed world has a computer!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 2, 2015 6:54 PM

Winning strategies start with a big idea.

metsepsis's comment, July 3, 2015 2:49 AM

Thats phenomenal
FELICIA PHILLIPS's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:01 PM

Starting with your big idea! #strategy #business

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9 Great Leadership Habits That Anyone Can Master

9 Great Leadership Habits That Anyone Can Master | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

One of the big questions in business is this: Are great leaders born that way, or do they practice a set of habits that anyone can learn and practice? The current thinking is that leadership is a set of habits that can be learned by anyone. The more consistent you are in living and applying these habits, the better leader you will become.

There are plenty of possible habits you can adopt to become a great leader, but here are 9 that will get you far along your own personal leadership journey.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

A few tips, nine in fact, that will help leaders improve on their leadership skills. While many would accept that some the habits are already practised by them, they would however agree to the fact that they need to build upon others. Leadership might be either innate or developed. In most cases where leadership is thrust upon those who are not born leaders, working on the nine habits listed in the article will help them a great deal!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 25, 2015 6:58 PM

Anyone can be a great leader, simply by mastering the habits of great leaders. So why not take your leadership from good to great?

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5 Lessons You Learn Your First Year at Harvard Business School

5 Lessons You Learn Your First Year at Harvard Business School | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Is getting an MBA worth it? It's a fraught question with passionately argued cases on both sides of the debate. But whether you think a stint at a top-tier business school is overpriced and creativity dulling or a golden ticket to success, everyone would have to agree that getting the knowledge of an MBA without the huge price tag or two-year time commitment is a great deal.

Which makes a recent Medium post by Ellen Chisa a must read who for anyone who is unlikely to make it over to Boston to attend HBS any time soon.

A current student, Chisa generously walks readers through the ten courses every first-year MBA student must take and reveals the most mind-blowing insight she took away from each. Some of her course descriptions will be of interest only to those in certain industries or roles, while others resist summarizing (but are still well worth a read in full). Here, however, are those that can be boiled down for entrepreneurs, along with several case studies (purchase required) that Chisa recommends if you want to do further reading.

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Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

This is a most informative article that gives you an insight into one of the world's top B.Schools and what can be learned about the MBA programme provided by it.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 28, 2015 6:49 PM

A current student explains the most mind-blowing insights she learned her first year at HBS

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The 3 Things That Stop Most People From Achieving Their Goals

The 3 Things That Stop Most People From Achieving Their Goals | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

How many goals have you set in your life? A hundred? Ten thousand? Even more?

How many of these goals have you actually achieved?

If you're like most people, this second number is going to be a fraction of the first. A big reason is that as soon as you set a goal, three things emerge to stop you. But most of us don't even realize what they are, and as a result, we are just left with our unaccomplished goal and an unshakable feeling of failure.

What if you could not only identify these obstacles but also learn to welcome them? Well, the good new is that you can....


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

This is an important aritcle which will help you learn to achieve your goals by first addressing the obstacles that prevent you from doing so. The first obstacle is the baggage of considerations that you carry on your shoulders, including negative thoughts that kill initiative at the outset. The second obstacle is formed of your fears, the fear of failure, the fear of stepping out of one's comfort zone, and the third obstacle is formed of roadblocks. Roadblocks unlike the first two are not mental obstacles, rather they are external obstacles like for example your flight getting delayed, or  an important employee leaving the organisation midway! Well there are ways of getting around roadblocks and these include having a plan B or plan C, planning for the unexpected, and anyway having a positive attitude might help you surmount even the toughest roadblocks that fate may throw upon you!

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Graeme Reid's curator insight, April 20, 2015 8:54 PM

If you can look for the considerations, fears, and roadblocks and know that they are simply a part of the process, then you can welcome them, face them, process them, and ultimately overcome them.

Jessica Urquhart's curator insight, April 21, 2015 11:15 PM

I have learnt that when dealing with human beings, nothing is set in stone. I like that the writer has taken his own experiences and believes that most people have the same values and beliefs. I feel that there are many factors that get in the way of achieving goals and this is no different to safety culture. In the future I'd like to see businesses understand all the varied types of people that their management systems must adapt to. In history there seems to be only one type of management system and is widely misunderstood by the majority of people within the organisation. Understanding personal values, goals and behaviours should be the foundation of any management system.

Tom Bundick, Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 3, 2015 10:48 AM

Neither autism nor neuro, specifically speaking. Great conceptualization of what gets in our way, though.

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Are You Emotionally Intelligent? Here's How to Know for Sure

Are You Emotionally Intelligent? Here's How to Know for Sure | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 percent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success.

 

Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 percent of top performers have high emotional intelligence.

 

Emotional intelligence is the "something" in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions to achieve positive results.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

An interesting article indeed, that tells us a lot about the importance of emotional intelligence (E.Q.). It is clear that a very high I.Q. devoid of the ability and skills requred to live in a world built out of a social fabric of relations does not indicate success! Taken in a social context, I.Q. + E.Q. = Success! And moreover, there is a mathematical logic to the same.

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Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, March 27, 2015 7:20 PM

Lots in the article to be aware of, notice and practice...

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Eugenia Papaioannou's comment, April 4, 2015 7:23 AM
Emotional intelligence is an essential factor in motor learning. Teachers should be aware of this to maximise results in the learning process. Eugenia Papaioannou, EFL teacher, teachers' trainer, author.