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How to Be a Writer: Hemingway’s Advice to Aspiring Authors

How to Be a Writer: Hemingway’s Advice to Aspiring Authors | On Writing | Scoop.it
"As a writer you should not judge. You should understand."

Ernest Hemingway has contributed a great deal to the collected advice of great (Happy birthday, Hemingway!
Isaac's insight:

One of the most beloved writers of his time, Ernest Hemingway's works have been studied, scrutinized over the years, helping many an aspiring author on his or her way to becoming a literary master. In this article, we learn that truly great writers are not simply great at putting pen to paper but in the way they think and act in their lives. They understand people instead of judging, and listen more than they talk. They remember rather than move on, and are truly empathetic. And because of all these things, when they do put pen to paper, the result is fantastical and magical to behold the mind's eye. Great writers live differently from the average person.

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Will the internet kill the literary novel? Depends on who you ask ...

Will the internet kill the literary novel? Depends on who you ask ... | On Writing | Scoop.it
Author Tim Parks argues that our technology-shredded attention spans have definitively doomed the novel, but many other writers, from John Banville to Francesca Segal, disagree, writes Alison Flood.
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The take away is the timeless adage of "Adapt, Or Die". Which is all too true in the exponential explosion of technology in our world. While authors can complain all they want and wither into history, those that adapt and embrace technology with the old art of writing will be the ones to reap rewards that will otherwise elude them.

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The Value of 10 Minutes: Writing Advice for the Time-Less Academic | Chronicle Vitae

The Value of 10 Minutes: Writing Advice for the Time-Less Academic | Chronicle Vitae | On Writing | Scoop.it

By Gregory Semenza

 

If you’ve got a small block of time between meetings or before class, don’t just fire up YouTube. Writing in frequent, short bursts will make you a more productive and focused scholar.

 

Read the original post


Via ASEEES
Isaac's insight:

Gregory Semenza introduces some advice that seems to elude many of us - whether we are a student dealing a dreaded research paper , an aspiring author in the works with a huge manuscript or an executive with a long report due. And his advice is simple - write a little everyday. Too often, we get swallowed up in the enormity of the task before us and fail to break it up into bite sized chunks. Writing a little everyday is akin to how an ant works. 
It may seem so little at first, but over time, the little bits of work will add up into something of significance. 

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In Writing, Nadine Gordimer Explored Why We're All Here

In Writing, Nadine Gordimer Explored Why We're All Here | On Writing | Scoop.it
"I am not a political person by nature," Nadine Gordimer once said. "I don't suppose, if I had lived elsewhere, my writing would have

Via Charles Tiayon
Isaac's insight:

Nadine Gordimer gives a rare glimpse into how the mind of an author works. "Writers themselves don't analyze what they do," she said, "to analyze would be to look down while crossing a canyon on a tightrope." This struck me hard as sometimes we stifle the potential of our creative abilities in a world that is over reliant on facts, figures and numbers. Instead of quantifying and qualifying ourselves, perhaps it is time to simply let go and allow ourselves to perform to the best of our abilities without the fear of criticism, failure or judgment. 

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, July 21, 2014 11:31 AM

"I am not a political person by nature," Nadine Gordimer once said. "I don't suppose, if I had lived elsewhere, my writing would have reflected politics."

Gordimer was born in South Africa in the early 1920s, into a society divided and identified by the crime of apartheid. Official racial segregation and suppression was wound into everyday life.

Her mother mostly kept her home from school, so Gordimer began to write for companionship. She published her first short story in The Children's Sunday Express when she was 15 years old, and essentially wrote for a living until her death this week, at the age of 90.

Nadine Gordimer wrote 15 novels, a few of which were banned by the South African government, and when one of her short stories appeared in a British or U.S. magazine that reached South Africa, officials ripped out her pages.

The suppression intended to silence her and millions more only galvanized Nadine Gordimer, who became an anti-apartheid activist in an age when activism didn't just mean liking something on Facebook. She hid wanted anti-apartheid fighters in her home, and helped Nelson Mandela with the famous speech he gave from the defendant's dock in 1964, about the ideals for which he was prepared to die.

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Post-Apocalyptic Novels Are Stuck in the Past - Slate Magazine

Post-Apocalyptic Novels Are Stuck in the Past - Slate Magazine | On Writing | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
Post-Apocalyptic Novels Are Stuck in the Past
Slate Magazine
Most of us never would have heard of Edan Lepucki's debut novel, about a post-apocalyptic Golden State, except for a battle between Amazon and book publishers.
Isaac's insight:

At first glance, it seems that Joe Mathews is discussing the lack of scenery for post apocalyptic scenarios, but in reality, the roots of this discussion go further than that. Just as how forests or deserts are constantly reused in one post apocalypse after another, many stories suffer the same lack of imagination. Today's blockbuster films revolve primarily around superheroes, from Superman to Guardians of the Galaxy. Where have the truly original storylines gone - like the Matrix trilogy, or Inception? Today's film producers and writers seem to be looking outwardly for inspiration and ideas, where perhaps they should be looking to themselves to develop something truly creative and original.

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In the UK, Traditional Publishing's Pay for Authors 'Not Fair ...

In the UK, Traditional Publishing's Pay for Authors 'Not Fair ... | On Writing | Scoop.it
In the UK, the Society of Authors' chief executive claims that traditional publishers' terms 'are no longer fair or sustainable' for author's to make a living.
Isaac's insight:

Dennis Abrams poses a real life problem for writers in this article - not the usual "how to get over writers' block" or "find inspiration", but the non-literary problem of whether to seek a traditional publisher or publish yourself. Writers in the past would use a publisher almost exclusively, but with today's e-books, blogs and other medium, the choice is difficult to make. 

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Stephen King On How To Write - Business Insider

Stephen King On How To Write - Business Insider | On Writing | Scoop.it
Timeless advice from bestselling author Stephen King on how to be an excellent writer.
Isaac's insight:

One thing I appreciate the most about Stephen King is his willingness to give ageless tips on writing. He may come across as brusque, unapologetic and maybe downright rude sometimes, but his skill in the art more than than makes up for it. In this article, he tells budding writers to stop watching TV, prepare for immense failure, don't be a people pleaser, write for yourself and other advice that has seen him rise to the renowned status today. This list of advice shows that being an author is no easy task.

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Why academics can't write | Prospect Magazine

Why academics can't write | Prospect Magazine | On Writing | Scoop.it
They write about the language of managers being filled with “nominalization” and “passivization”; and they refer to the coining of new managerial terms, such as “autocondimentation,” as “relexicalization.” Just like the catering ...
Isaac's insight:

This is something that I have come to understand only recently; I was one of those that fell into the trap that the bigger and more complex the word you used, the more intelligent/professional you sounded. Alas, nothing could be greater from the truth. Many best selling authors employ the art of simplistic language - because the simpler the language, the greater your audience. In addition, it is no mean feat to use simple language in an articulate manner - an under-appreciated and supremely effective style of writing.

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Dungeons & Dragons helped hone their skills, authors say - Columbus Dispatch

Dungeons & Dragons helped hone their skills, authors say - Columbus Dispatch | On Writing | Scoop.it
Columbus Dispatch
Dungeons & Dragons helped hone their skills, authors say
Columbus Dispatch
“A Song of Ice and Fire” series (who still enjoys role-playing games); and “weird fiction” author China Mieville ( The City & the City).
Isaac's insight:

It is a rare few who understand the power in games to give rise  and inspiration to creative works such as writing. Dungeons and Dragons more so than most other games, as its lack of a linear path and free form play is capable of infinite possibilities. Sometimes, when a writer's block has halted the progress of an author, perhaps non traditional methods of seeking inspiration should be considered, such as playing a game of D&D. After all, it is a fun and relaxing way to take a break and perhaps discover an entire new plot or two while slaying imaginary dragons and exploring virtual dungeons.

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STEPHEN KING on Writing, Scary Stories, and More

http://www.bordersmedia.com/ is the place to watch this whole program, and more cools shows like this one!
Isaac's insight:

Stephen King provides a great insight into the disappearing art of the short story in an era where authors produce novels almost exclusively. His no holds barred, not afraid to say something inappropriate manner in his interviews is refreshing, often providing insight into areas where more politically correct may not broach.

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