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Scrivener (writer's software)

Scrivener (writer's software) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Current cost is $45. Many writers swear by Scrivener.

 

Description from Wikipedia

 

Scrivener is a word-processing program designed for writers. Scrivener provides a management system for documents, notes and metadata. This allows the user to keep track of notes, concepts, research and whole documents for reference (documents including text, images, PDF, audio, video, web pages, etc.). After writing a piece of text the user may export it to a full-fledged word processor for formatting.

 

Features include a corkboard, an outliner, iPhoto-like full-screen mode and "snapshots" (the ability to save a copy of a particular document prior to any drastic changes). Because of its breadth of interfaces and features, it has positioned itself not only as a word processor, but as a literary "project management tool", and includes many user-interface features that resemble Apple's software-development environment Xcode.

 

Keith Blount created the program as a tool to help him write the "big novel", allowing him to keep track of all of his ideas and research. It is his first application, built mostly on libraries and features of Mac OS X from v10.4 onward. In 2011 a Windows version of the software was released. It is written and maintained by Lee Powell. A Linux version of Scrivener remains available in beta form.

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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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See book availability from your local library

See book availability from your local library | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"Of all the network tools we featured in the past year, Library Extension stood out as the clear reader favorite. We're also fans of this simple chrome extension that makes it easy to find and request books at your local public library. Best of all, Library Extension is continuing to grow, allowing readers to find books at libraries across the United States, Canada, and Australia. Library Extension also makes it easy for users to request new or additional libraries.

 

"Library Extension detects when you're viewing a book or ebook on a site like Amazon or Goodreads and adds a box showing the availability of that item in your local library. If you have access to more than one local library, it is able to check all of them. When an item is available from your library, Library Extension will also include a link allowing you to reserve it. Library Extension currently integrates with over 4,000 local libraries. Users can request support for additional libraries with a simple contact form. Users do not need to register for any additional accounts to use Library Extension. Currently, Library Extension is available for Google Chrome. A version for Mozilla Firefox is under development."

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9 Web Tools for Creating Digital Magazines – Teacher Reboot Camp :: Shelly Terrell

9 Web Tools for Creating Digital Magazines – Teacher Reboot Camp :: Shelly Terrell | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Now, creating a digital magazine is much easier. With web tools, students can layout their writings, pick from hundreds of cool fonts, and add their own images or choose from a library of stock images. Some web tools allow students to embed video and audio. Below I’ve listed some free educational web tools for creating a class ezine.
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Robot-Enhanced Creative Writing and Storytelling (featuring Ozobot and Wonder’s Dot)

Robot-Enhanced Creative Writing and Storytelling (featuring Ozobot and Wonder’s Dot) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
There have been complaints leveraged against out of the box robots like Dash and Dot, Ozobot, Hummingbird, Sphero. The complaints usually revolve around the canned and prescriptive nature of their uses and programs, that they lack creative engagement by the younger users. I personally love the excitement my learners have using these robots. As with…

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7 Great Ways to Encourage Your Grade-Schooler’s Writing

7 Great Ways to Encourage Your Grade-Schooler’s Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Does your child struggle with writing? From Journal Jars to scrapbooks, here are creative and fun ways to encourage her to write!

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
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Writing a Main Character: Definitions, Tips and Examples

Writing a Main Character: Definitions, Tips and Examples | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
The main characters in a story drive plot, attract readers’ empathy (or loathing) and carry your story along. Understanding how to write a lovable, loathsome, or otherwise engaging main character is a vital skill to develop. Read on for definitions, examples and tips to make your primary characters memorable:
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Why Journalism Might Actually Be the Class of the Future :: John Spencer

Why Journalism Might Actually Be the Class of the Future :: John Spencer | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"When people talk about the future of learning, they often mention technology and engineering. Things like Sphero balls and Arduino sets and coding projects. While I love the emphasis on STEM and STEAM, I can’t help but wonder if maybe we miss out on the power of journalism because it isn’t shiny and new.

"However, if you ask people what type of technology skills students will need in the future, you’ll hear things like digital citizenship, media literacy, and creative thinking. Unfortunately, schools tend to teach these topics in isolation, as if they exist in separate little buckets.


"But journalism takes the buckets and mixes them all together. Here, these ideas overlap constantly."

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 10, 5:31 PM

In today's political climate one might underestimate the power and the importance of the media, but every day we are influenced by one journalistic voice or another. Journalism is changing for many reasons. It's import isn't likely to decrease though what it offers the world may continue to evolve.

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The OPTIC Strategy for Visual Analysis –

The OPTIC Strategy for Visual Analysis – | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
The OPTIC Strategy is a 5-step method used to analyze visuals. The strategy can be used to analyze any visual work.

Using the OPTIC Strategy can help you to prepare for the AP exam, but it can also provide you with a framework of analysis to be used in a wide variety of situations: tell your boss if the new billboard will get the right message across, analyze a website for a little extra money on the side, or impress a date with an intellectual analysis of a painting at the museum.

Now that you know when to use it, it’s time to get to how. The five steps are (1) overview, (2) parts, (3) title, (4) interrelationships, and (5) conclusion. Now for a more useful study guide, check out the infographic below.
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Write to learn, not just to communicate –

Writing can be an incredible tool for learning and understanding complex ideas. Writing can help you organize your thoughts, ascribe meaning to new concepts and see your own misconceptions about a topic. When you write, you connect ideas in ways you wouldn’t by just thinking about them.
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21 Digital Tools To Build Vocabulary -

21 Digital Tools To Build Vocabulary - | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
21 Digital Tools To Build #Vocabulary @TeachThought https://t.co/plu5IMx1bC #edtech #teachers #literacy #K12 https://t.co/ZlmMnxotKG
Via Kirschty Birt, Terri Finn, Dennis Swender, Jim Lerman
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The Purdue OWL: Writing in the Engineering Classroom

The Purdue OWL: Writing in the Engineering Classroom | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
This set of OWL resources aims to help engineering instructors and TAs create and assess a variety of short, low-overhead writing exercises for use in engineering courses. The primary focus here is on “writing to learn” assignments, which leverage writing to improve students’ conceptual understanding of technical concepts.

 

From The Scout Report

 

"The Purdue OWL recently created this helpful resource for incorporating writing instruction into engineering classrooms, which may be useful for engineering instructors and teaching assistants. Created with support from the National Science Foundation's Research Initiation Grant in Engineering Education (RIGEE), these resources are designed with two purposes. The first is to support students in developing their writing skills; the second, to help students understand engineering concepts through writing exercises. With these dual aims in mind, this collection highlights six kinds of writing prompts that instructors might use with engineering students. These consist of conceptual writing prompts aimed at asking students to explain engineering concepts, such as fluid mechanics, in writing. Others include explain-a-problem writing prompts, which are designed to accompany engineering computational problems; how stuff works writing prompts (one example: "Explain how the gears of a bicycle work? What is changing when you change gears?"); real-world example writing prompts; design-a-problem writing prompts; and open-ended design writing prompts (one example: "Design a viewing platform that hangs over the Grand Canyon.")"

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Nik's QuickShout: 10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills :: Nik Peachey

Nik's QuickShout: 10 Tools & Resources for Developing Writing Skills :: Nik Peachey | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Over the last couple of months I've found and written about a number of really great tools and resources to help improve our students' writing skills. This is a collection of links to reviews of ten of the best.
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22 Online Tools That Will Help Learners With Improving Writing Skills

22 Online Tools That Will Help Learners With Improving Writing Skills | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Here are at least 14 trusty online tools of all kinds to give your students the edge as they work on improving writing skills.

Via Allen Tiffany
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I Downloaded the Information That Facebook Has on Me. Yikes. - Brian X. Chen - The New York Times

I Downloaded the Information That Facebook Has on Me. Yikes. - Brian X. Chen - The New York Times | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

[You owe it to yourself to read this. Despite what I thought I knew, I found it harrowing. -JL]

 

"When I downloaded a copy of my Facebook data last week, I didn’t expect to see much. My profile is sparse, I rarely post anything on the site, and I seldom click on ads. (I’m what some call a Facebook “lurker.”)

"But when I opened my file, it was like opening Pandora’s box.

"With a few clicks, I learned that about 500 advertisers — many that I had never heard of, like Bad Dad, a motorcycle parts store, and Space Jesus, an electronica band — had my contact information, which could include my email address, phone number and full name. Facebook also had my entire phone book, including the number to ring my apartment buzzer. The social network had even kept a permanent record of the roughly 100 people I had deleted from my friends list over the last 14 years, including my exes.

"There was so much that Facebook knew about me — more than I wanted to know. But after looking at the totality of what the Silicon Valley company had obtained about yours truly, I decided to try to better understand how and why my data was collected and stored. I also sought to find out how much of my data could be removed.

"How Facebook collects and treats personal information was central this week when Mark Zuckerberg, the company’s chief executive, answered questions in Congress about data privacy and his responsibilities to users. During his testimony, Mr. Zuckerberg repeatedly said Facebook has a tool for downloading your data that “allows people to see and take out all the information they’ve put into Facebook.” (Those who want to download their own Facebook data can use this link.)

"But that’s an overstatement. Most basic information, like my birthday, could not be deleted. More important, the pieces of data that I found objectionable, like the record of people I had unfriended, could not be removed from Facebook, either."


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WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign

WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"We dedicated our Fall 2017 special issue of The Scout Report to the topic of banned and challenged books, in honor of the American Library Association's 35th annual Banned Books Week. Our special issue was a reader favorite on social media and no website was more popular than the fabulous blog We Need Diverse Books. Why did we feature this resource in our Banned Books Week issue? As writer Malinda Lo noted in 2014, books that feature diverse characters and tackle issues such as disability, racism, and sexuality are more likely to be challenged than other fiction titles. We Need Diverse Books offers a wonderful way for readers to learn about new books for teen readers that address these issues.

 

"In 2014, young adult fiction writer Malinda Lo penned an essay called "Book Challenges Suppress Diversity." Drawing on the ALA's annual list of the most frequently challenged books, Lo demonstrated that "over half of the Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books from 2000-2009 addressed issues about race, sexuality and/or disability; or were about non-white, LGBTQ and/or disabled characters." We Need Diverse Books, part of the Banned Books Week Coalition, is a grassroots organization that aims to promote diversity and representation in young adult literature. The group defines diversity as "including (but not limited to) LGBTQIA, people of color, gender diversity, people with disabilities, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities." The organization's tumblr, which collects articles and reviews from around the web, provides an excellent way for readers, educators, librarians, youth workers, and caretakers to find books that are by diverse authors or feature diverse characters and topics. Recent posts include a profile of author Linda Sue Park for Kirkus Reviews; a story about the the first ever Well-Read Black Girl Festival that originally appeared in Electric Lit; and a story from Indian Country Today about Kinsale Hueston, a Navajo high school student who was recently named one of five National Student Poets."

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7 Things We Can Do Right Now for Our ELL Writers by VALENTINA GONZALEZ

7 Things We Can Do Right Now for Our ELL Writers by VALENTINA GONZALEZ | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
BY VALENTINA GONZALEZ

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Jim Lerman
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From Superheroes to Syrian Refugees: Teaching Comics and Graphic Novels With Resources From The New York Times - The New York Times

From Superheroes to Syrian Refugees: Teaching Comics and Graphic Novels With Resources From The New York Times - The New York Times | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
On this site, we’re all about visual literacy, and some of our most popular features — from our Monday What’s Going On in This Picture? photojournalism exercise to our Friday Film Club to our daily Picture Prompts — were invented to use great New York Times multimedia storytelling to help students better understand the news, our culture and how current events can relate to their lives.

But as more and more schools are teaching with graphic novels, as a superhero movie has become such a hit that educators on Twitter are collaborating on a #WakandaCurriculum, and as our own newspaper won a Pulitzer Prize for reporting done in the form of a comic strip, we decided it was time for the comics genre to get its own lesson plan.

Below, we’ve brought together a wealth of Times resources and suggested ways to teach and learn with them. We’ve also posed a related Student Opinion question, “What Have You Learned From Comics?” that is based on an essay we asked George Gene Gustines, the Times comic-book-industry reporter, to write for us. Please invite your students to weigh in.
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Brain Waves Instruction

Brain Waves Instruction | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Scroll down on the page to locate this post. -JL

 

"Did you know that researchers have found that children's persuasive writing abilities develop more slowly than any other genre (Applebee, Langer, & Mullins, 1986)?  That means that it is essential that we get students writing persuasively as often as possible. One of the best ways to motivate students to write persuasively is with really fun and engaging writing topics.  In addition, when we give students different types of ways to write persuasively from speeches to critical reviews, we can really engage students.  

"In the spirit of getting students writing, I've compiled 15 of my favorite topics and styles of persuasive writing. These ideas are sure to get your students excited about writing persuasively!"

 

via Elaine J. Roberts

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Nine Teaching Ideas for Using Music to Inspire Student Writing - The New York Times

Nine Teaching Ideas for Using Music to Inspire Student Writing - The New York Times | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
In this teaching resource, we suggest nine exercises to use music to inspire student writing — from creating annotated playlists and critical reviews to music-inspired poetry and personal narratives. Each idea pulls from Times reporting, Opinion pieces and multimedia on music to give students a place to start. The activities are categorized according to three genres: creative and narrative writing; informative and explanatory writing; and persuasive and argumentative writing.
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SOAPSTone Strategy for Written Analysis –

SOAPSTone Strategy for Written Analysis – | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
SOAPSTone is an analytical strategy that you can use when reading texts, writing about texts and planning original writing. There are 6 steps that make up the analytical process of the strategy (and the acronym).
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DIDLS Strategy for Analyzing Tone

DIDLS Strategy for Analyzing Tone | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
DIDLS is a strategy for analyzing tone. It usually applies to a written or oral text. . It's an acronym that stands for diction, imagery, details, language and structure. To begin your analysis, it helps to have

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5 Chrome Extensions to Help You Write :: David Lockhart

5 Chrome Extensions to Help You Write :: David Lockhart | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
No matter what happens writing is a skill we will always need. It's one of the only skills that the need for it has gone unchanged in the age of technology. In fact, it's almost more needed because of online writing! Remember, when you post on social media you are writing!
      While writing is a must, it's also HARD! Thankfully, Google has given us the power of Chrome Extensions, and developers have given us writing help! 
              Here are five chrome extensions that will help you (and your students) improve your writing!
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5-Minute Writing Conferences

5-Minute Writing Conferences | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Writing teachers know that students need to write a lot and get meaningful feedback in order to improve their writing. We also know what it feels like to be buried under a pile of student writing that needs to be read and commented on, and although there are many strategies that can help us deal with this paper load, it’s still a daunting part of our work with students.

When I initially considered conferencing with each and every student in my classes to reduce the need for written comments, I was apprehensive about the time commitment, but with the help of a colleague who had made it work in his classroom, I recently took the plunge and did writing conferences with my students—and it had a huge impact on my classroom and my students’ learning.

Via Mel Riddile, Dennis Swender
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Haiku Education Resources

Haiku Education Resources | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via The Scout Report

 

"The Haiku Foundation (THF) is a non-profit organization that aims to "preserve and archive the accomplishments of our first century of haiku in English, and to provide resources for its expansion in our next." On the foundation's Educational Resources page, K-12 and college educators will find resources for integrating haiku into the classroom. These resources are organized by grade level and are designed to complement existing language arts curriculum. Resources include lesson plans, classroom handouts, and "teaching stories" (reflections from educators who incorporated haiku into their classrooms). Most lesson plans on this website were designed by THF president Jim Kacian and by poet Ellen Grace Olinger, Ed.D. Additional lesson plans were contributed by poets Brad Bennett and Tom Painting."

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The Book Marketing Maze: 22 Wrong Turns & How To Avoid Them | Bestseller Labs

The Book Marketing Maze: 22 Wrong Turns & How To Avoid Them | Bestseller Labs | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A guide to the 22 most common book marketing 'wrong turns', and how to avoid them - so you can start selling more books.

Via Allen Tiffany
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Allen Tiffany's curator insight, December 28, 2015 6:05 PM

Though a couple years old, a good article on things new authors should avoid. As true now as it was when written. 

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How Steinbeck Used the Diary as a Tool of Discipline, a Hedge Against Self-Doubt, and a Pacemaker for the Heartbeat of Creative Work :: Maria Popova

How Steinbeck Used the Diary as a Tool of Discipline, a Hedge Against Self-Doubt, and a Pacemaker for the Heartbeat of Creative Work :: Maria Popova | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Many celebrated writers have championed the creative benefits of keeping a diary, but no one has put the diary to more impressive practical use in the creative process than John Steinbeck (February 27, 1902–December 20, 1968). In the spring of 1938, shortly after performing one of the greatest acts of artistic courage — that of changing one’s mind when a creative project is well underway, as Steinbeck did when he abandoned a book he felt wasn’t living up to his humanistic duty — he embarked on the most intense writing experience of his life. The public fruit of this labor would become the 1939 masterwork The Grapes of Wrath — a title his politically radical wife, Carol Steinbeck, came up with after reading The Battle Hymn of the Republic by Julia Howe. The novel earned Steinbeck the Pulitzer Prize in 1940 and was a cornerstone for his Nobel Prize two decades later, but its private fruit is in many ways at least as important and morally instructive.

Alongside the novel, Steinbeck also began keeping a diary, eventually published as Working Days: The Journals of The Grapes of Wrath (public library) — a remarkable living record of his creative journey, in which this extraordinary writer tussles with excruciating self-doubt (exactly the kind Virginia Woolf so memorably described) but plows forward anyway, with equal parts gusto and grist, driven by the dogged determination to do his best with the gift he has despite his limitations. His daily journaling becomes a practice both redemptive and transcendent.

Steinbeck had only two requests for the diary — that it wouldn’t be made public in his lifetime, and that it should be made available to his two sons so they could “look behind the myth and hearsay and flattery and slander a disappeared man becomes and to know to some extent what manner of man their father was.” It stands, above all, as a supreme testament to the fact that the sole substance of genius is the daily act of showing up.
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