Scriveners' Trappings
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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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The Art of Revision: Most of What You Write Should Be Cut

The Art of Revision: Most of What You Write Should Be Cut | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"When I compose a first draft I just let everything I feel and think spill out raw and chaotically on the page. I let it be a mess. I trust my instincts. I just let my ideas and feelings flow until I run out of words. It’s fine for an early draft to be a disaster area. I don’t censor myself. When I have this raw copy, I can then decide if this idea is worth pung more effort into. If so, then with the second draft, I clean up spelling and grammar. I add anything I forgot to include in the first draft and take out whatever isn’t working. Then the real fun begins with the third draft. (Despite its importance, art should always be a form of play.) That’s where I work on what I know are my creative weaknesses."


Via Sharon Bakar, Penelope, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, August 9, 2017 8:25 PM
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Penelope's curator insight, August 10, 2017 9:38 PM
I love this piece. It absolutely sings and goes straight to the heart of a writer. If you are a creative, you should feel inspired and thankful for the opportunity to create beautiful art with your words.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"*** 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 15, 2017 1:37 PM
An interesting article that underscores the complexity and messiness of good writing.
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How To Write An Amazing Plot Twist

How To Write An Amazing Plot Twist | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
I love a good page turner. There are few things more satisfying to me then starting a book and not physically being able to put it down. So much so that you look up from said book only to realize that you've been in your pajamas all day, and now it's nighttime. Such was the wonderful…

Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, February 15, 2017 10:17 PM
I absolutely love stories that stand up the hair on your arms--those rare plots where you never know what's lurking around each corner and senses are firing on all cylinders.

Want to know how to write your own creeper? This article gives us some really great ideas for a whiplash of a ride sure to thrill the reader.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 20, 2017 12:39 PM
I like the idea of starting with something that you never pull off. Students could buy into that.
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NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com

NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

In November, nearly half a million people around the world will embark on a remarkable quest. National Novel Writing Month. 


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, October 14, 2016 12:20 PM
Fiction writing can be a daunting challenge for even the most talented. Facing a blank page can snuff out creative sparks that once burned brightly. 

Enter Evernote. I use this powerful tool all the time for clipping web pages, PDF's, etc. Evernote has created six powerful templates found inside this article that can be saved and used to the NANO writer's advantage. A little planning may get the timid writing instead of quaking. Super tool to add to your writing arsenal.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 15, 2016 9:48 AM
For Evernote fans--or beginners--some templates to use during NANOWRMO
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The Future Of Storytelling (Free MOOC) ~ iversity

The Future Of Storytelling (Free MOOC) ~ iversity | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Together with a whole network of media researchers, creators and students we will:
- learn storytelling basics such as antagonist/protagonist relationships, narrative/narrated time, ...
- have a look at exciting current media projects
- analyze how they are designed and executed based on aforementioned basics
- and discuss how (and if) new online tools and formats change the way stories are told and perceived.

The 8-chapter course starts on October 25th, 2013 and ends on December 20th, 2013.

It will offer weekly video material, lessons, interviews and tasks on the following topics (not necessarily in this order):
- storytelling basics
- serial formats (on the TV, web and beyond)
- storytelling in role-playing games
- interactive storytelling in video games
- transmedia storytelling
- alternate-reality gaming
- augmented reality and location-based storytelling
- the role of tools, interfaces and information architectures in current storytelling.

Our first Storytelling-MOOC will focus on fictional formats.


"Our goal is to inspire and help understand. To broaden our horizon of what is and might be possible and what has already been attempted, and what has succeeded or even failed - and why.
In several little tasks you'll analyze and practice storytelling on your own and in teams."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 15, 2013 8:17 PM

This MOOC will be led by a team based at the University of Potsdam, Germany

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Narrativs

Narrativs | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Stories that move us

Description by New Learning Times

 

"Everyone has a Story to Tell
Do you have a story you would like to share? Do you enjoy reading short stories?Narrativs believes that everyone has a story to tell and aims to connect people all over the world through storytelling. Narrativs has created a digital space where aspiring writers can gain support for their work and receive constructive criticism. On the Narrativs website everyone is invited to submit a poem or short story – fiction or non-fiction. The Narrativs editing team provides feedback on the submission and the author is encouraged to make the necessary changes. After the piece goes through the editing process the story is then published on the Narrativs site and readers can rate and write comments in reaction to the story. This new publishing format allows one to learn about the world from many different perspectives by reading this diverse collection of stories.

 

"Social Entrepreneurship 
Narrativs aims to give everyone a voice, not only by creating a platform for writers to share their work, but also by financially supporting non- profit projects that promote literacy. Founder, Rachel Ngoc Anh Bui was inspired to develop Narrativs after listening to a global responsibility-focused speech by the prince of Norway. Narrativs plans to gather the best stories from the site to publish in a book. The money that the book generates will be given to groups that aid education in developing countries. The Narrativs team hopes to inspire others to find ways to develop businesses that make the world a better place. The team has been visiting schools in the United States and motivating students to create businesses that are socially responsible. Narrativs is creating a valuable narrative around both digital authorship and global citizenship."

 

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Margaret Waage's comment, August 31, 2013 1:58 PM
I love this idea because it is true. What I love even more is the idea of sharing narratives because that experience is what connects us to each other.
mtmeme's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:01 PM

Interesting type of support!

harish magan's comment, September 3, 2013 8:16 AM
It is indeed very powerful and wish to study deep on the subject.
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100 Days of Flash Fiction Prompts | creative writing blog

100 Days of Flash Fiction Prompts | creative writing blog | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Writing flash fiction is a terribly satisfying way to spend an hour or two. For your fleet-fingered effusions, I’ve collated all my Twitter flash fiction prompts into a handy ebook.


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, June 27, 2017 8:52 PM
This lady, as in "The Lady Writer," is very generous with her plot outlines and templates. She's graciously provided us with creative writing prompts which can be downloaded as an ebook. I love 'em, as they're the oil that greases the wheels of the 'ole brain, and gets it chugging again. Lady has shared 100 days of flash fiction prompts, and if the idea makes your hand cramp, then try 30. Ready, set, go!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
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How to Write From Third Person Omniscient and Third Person Limited Viewpoints

How to Write From Third Person Omniscient and Third Person Limited Viewpoints | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Learn all about Third Person Omniscient and Third Person Limited: how to write for both, and why one of them is much more suited to contemporary authors. And all of it is illustrated by a nice graphic murder story!


Via Sherrey Meyer
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6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing

6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ Alfred Hitchcock was an English film director and producer who worked closely with screenwriters on his films. The master storyteller, born 13 August 1899, died 29 April 1980.”

Via Shannon Bolithoe , Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, August 16, 2016 12:44 PM
Alfred Hitchcock had the scream theme down pat. These tips, however, could apply to any writing genre to give it a new heartbeat. Great ideas!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

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Building Social Skills and Literacy Through Gaming - OnlineUniversities.com

Building Social Skills and Literacy Through Gaming - OnlineUniversities.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Justin Marquis


"The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated. Keith Oatley, an emeritus professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto, has proposed that reading produces a vivid simulation of reality, one that "runs on minds of readers just as computer simulations run on computers." Fiction — with its redolent details, imaginative metaphors and attentive descriptions of people and their actions — offers an especially rich replica. Indeed, in one respect novels go beyond simulating reality to give readers an experience unavailable off the page: the opportunity to enter fully into other people’s thoughts and feelings."
(Your Brain on Fiction, 17 March, 2012)


"The immediate thought prompted by this talk of "vivid simulation of reality," and being able to "give readers an experience unavailable off the page," was that video games do this too. In fact, they could provide a more richly interactive experience than reading because they have the capability to adapt for individual users and to provide branching scenarios based on different inputs. So the question is, can video games accomplish the same objectives that the authors are attributing to reading fiction?"


Via JackieGerstein Ed.D.
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