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Literary Agents Pitch as Well! - Women Writers, Women Books

Literary Agents Pitch as Well! - Women Writers, Women Books | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

Katie Shea Boutillier sheds light on her work day. Reading queury letters? During her commute, or in bed.  Imagine that. An Lit Agent's work is never done. 

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19th Century Gentile Author Describes Yiddish Tone of Voice as Questioning, Sing-Song and Implies More.

19th Century Gentile Author Describes Yiddish Tone of Voice as Questioning, Sing-Song and Implies More. | Write On! | Scoop.it
Door Ewoud Sanders Twee zwervelingen, een jeugdboek uit 1882 waarin een joodse jongen tot het christendom wordt bekeerd, bevat uitzonderlijk veel joodse woorden en uitdrukkingen, namelijk 41 – bedu…
Judith van Praag's insight:
The Dutch language, especially the Amsterdam lingo, is spiced with Yiddish words. On February 22, 2018 the digital Jiddisch-Nederlands dictionary (Jiddischwoordenboek) went live. 

Leave it to Ewoud Sanders to share a timely book review on the  Dutch language site Neerlandistiek about the use of Yiddish words in  "Twee Zwervelingen" (Two Wanderers) by 19th Century author Eduard Gerdes. 

Reading highlighted sentences out loud, I hear the Yiddish intonation as stressed and explained by the author, and see the derogatory implications that Sanders points out. 

I also remember books read together with my father, about the old Jewish neighborhood in Amsterdam. There was a mixture of exasperation (with G-d) and resignation a poor Yiddish speaker expressed by adding the question mark at the end of a statement. You can hear the "oi vey," or "vey iz mir."

Some years ago I listened to a program on NPR on voice and speaking patterns. Accomplished (young) women often spoke with what we Dutch call "a frog in the throat", yes, they croaked. You know what I'm talking about, right? And many had the tendency to end sentences on a higher note. 
Contradictory habits, the first would suggest a lower (more powerful) voice, whereas the added question mark showed they weren't completely sure of themselves. 
By the way this may no longer be the case in 2018, after all, women are speaking up, loud and clear these days. 

The tone of voice of the author of the YA book reviewed by Ewoud Sanders is derogatory when presenting Jewish characters. Yet, in reading Dutch Yiddish, I have "heard" a similar tone of voice, which I didn't hear in English translations of Isaac Bashevis Singer's books, that's interesting isn't it?

Does this mean Dutch Jews who received higher education were less likely to speak Yiddish, whereas in Eastern Europe Yiddish might have been the main language for all Jewish speakers? The original title of Sanders' article is "Only stubborn Jews continue to speak Yiddish."

At any rate this 19th Century Dutch YA book was geared toward boys, is about conversion, and about a Christian boy telling his Jewish friend how he should present himself, i.e. with less Yiddishkayt, and that is without a doubt a derogatory message.
Oi vey. 
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Why Kerry Lee Powell writes about trauma | CBC Radio

Why Kerry Lee Powell writes about trauma | CBC Radio | Write On! | Scoop.it
The short stories that comprise Powell's short story collection, Willem de Kooning's Paintbrush, take an unflinching look at violence and abuse.
Judith van Praag's insight:
Many of the characters in Willem de Kooning's Paintbrush are traumatized. Kerry Lee Powell says she looks for some kindness, something she couldn't offer her father, who died when she was eighteen. 
This interview appeared on my screen while I was thinking about my relationship with my father, and how it might or would have changed as I entered adolescence. We'll never know, since he died when I was thirteen and a half, he was spared the ordeal of having a teenager push off.
What I do know is that I cut him a lot of slack, always understanding his predicament, which resulted in a rather peculiar treatment of a child, his daughter, me.  
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MARGO Collective Call for Submissions

MARGŌ COLLECTIVE is open for submissions. We are looking for new, unpublished and original writing. Check our website for more info.
Judith van Praag's insight:
"Chained" is the theme of MARGO's present contest. While triggered by age old suffragettes, today's association may be literal, or metaphorical, read more on the site. Deadline is March 31, 2018.
Apart from that MARGO COLLECTIVE is always on the look-out for original material.
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Do Your Characters Talk too Much? When to Use Indirect Dialogue

Do Your Characters Talk too Much? When to Use Indirect Dialogue | Write On! | Scoop.it
Do your characters talk too much? When to use indirect dialogue, plus nine problems to look out for.when writing dialogue
Judith van Praag's insight:
Anne R. Allen dumps a gem in our midst. Readers don't like talking heads. No chicken without a head. Read like a writer. Write like a reader. The only Talking Heads we like are those in a relation to David Byrne. 
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Understanding the Objective Correlative

Understanding the Objective Correlative | Write On! | Scoop.it
Online Writers Workshop, Online Monthly Classes taught by published authors and industry professionals and Robust Literature Magazine with Columns, Interviews, Reviews and more.
Judith van Praag's insight:
Think of Objective Correlative as props used by a writer. Think of a painting by an old master, and how each object, each element speaks to the viewer, offering information, filling in details that complete the visual story. 
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How Facebook's changes will affect your author page - Jodi Gibson

How Facebook's changes will affect your author page - Jodi Gibson | Write On! | Scoop.it
Facebook recently announced changes to their algorithm which will affect page reach. So how will it affect writers and authors? Jodi Gibson shares.
Judith van Praag's insight:
Scraping throat. 
First, in one of the last paragraphs the author of the linked blog post, says about those who pull off making the FB page work for them: “Don’t be put off that they are published authors.” And then she includes the eat, love pray gal. Well, we writers all know her story don't we? That’s like bringing in Oprah as an example. Talented, yes. Hardworking, yes. At the right place at the right time, yes. 

Then the ironic: “The key word here is community. If you’re solely using social media (any platform) to sell, you’re already on the wrong tram. Building a community who engages with you is the goal.“ 

We FB users know all to well that FB only grants visibility to Page owners who Pay For Ads. And ads my friends are So Off Putting! Doesn’t matter what you write, “promoted” content is suspicious. Even seeing repeated ads for a special offer becomes a turn-off, to be skipped. Honestly. 

All successful authors I know who make use of Facebook communicate with their followers or friends via their personal account. They grew tired of the limitations of The Page.

IMNSHO: Being a published author, and famous at that, is what helps you gain community. 

Remember, we're talking about FB Pages here, not about building a Social Media Platform, that's something else. 
Do make friends on FB, do follow and be followed on Twitter, do post pictures on Instagram (if you don't mind others using them without crediting you), do maintain a blog, and do use Pinterest to show what your book is all about. 

Other than that, there is no way around it. Finish your books and win community via readership. Argh!
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Responding to Sarah Charlesworth: Creative Writing Workshop with Karen Holden | LACMA

Responding to Sarah Charlesworth: Creative Writing Workshop with Karen Holden | LACMA | Write On! | Scoop.it
Sarah Charlesworth (1947–2013) was a highly influential artist whose work examined the role that photographic images play in contemporary culture. Over Charlesworth’s 40-year career she explored representation and symbolism, first through re-photographing and collaging found images, and later through creating stylized arrangements for the camera.
Judith van Praag's insight:
If I were in Los Angeles on January 27, I'd participate in this workshop. Not to be missed if you're interested in ekphrasis. 
Join Karen Holden at LACMA!
And if you're not there, read up on the artist Sarah Charlesworth and see if her work will inspire you to write a poem, or narrative prose.

EKPHRASIS 
Ek
Phra
Sis

or

Ek
Phras
Tic
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Submission Guidelines for r.kv.r.y Recovery 

Submission Guidelines for r.kv.r.y Recovery  | Write On! | Scoop.it
r.kv.r.y. (rĭ-kŭv'ə-rē) 1. an act, process, or instance of recovering, 2. a return to normal conditions, 3. something gained or restored in recovering, 4. obtaining usable substances from unusabl
Judith van Praag's insight:
January's theme is "The Unspoken", I should've known sooner about r.kv.r.y But then again, any time is the right time. This publication looks to be right up my alley. After all, my first book's title was "Creative Acts of Healing". While that may speak to anybody, the subtitle may not have been of interest to everyone. In a way I hope it wasn't and isn't. 
Still, for those who need to find recognition in an other person's experience, it's there. It's here. And it's still available. Just let me know and I'll make sure you'll get a copy. 
In a few days it'll be a quarter of a century since the reason for the book came into this world. Creative Acts of Healing - after a baby dies. Yes, nearly twenty-five years ago our baby came into this world without opening her eyes after taking a breath too soon. And while the hurt is not raw anymore by any means, the pain lingers, and resurfaces in subtle ways every once in a while. That's why the magazine r.kv.r.y is right up my alley, still, after all these years. 

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Dana Levin Prize - Tupelo Press Application Deadline 

Dana Levin Prize - Tupelo Press Application Deadline  | Write On! | Scoop.it
Submission period:  September 1 — December 31 Deadline extended till January 14, 2018! Final Judge: Dana Levin Prize: $4,500 A $3,000 cash prize and a week-long residency at MASS MoCA worth $1,500 in addition to publication by Tupelo Press, 20 copies of the winning title, a book launch, and national distribution with energetic publicity and promotion. ... Read more
Judith van Praag's insight:
"Technical virtuosity" is something I don't claim to have under my hat, considering poems. If that would be all the folks at Tupelo Press are looking for, I'd be out the door before even entering. Reading on I see they also look for other elements. Check out what's on their wish list, re: Dana Levin Prize (not the Dorset Prize), the following is from their desk.

"Before you submit a manuscript to a Tupelo Press competition, please consider exploring the work of the poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination; memorable, vivid imagery and strikingly musical approaches to language; willingness to take risks; and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience."
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Rituals for Writing: Creating a Sacred Space

Rituals for Writing: Creating a Sacred Space | Write On! | Scoop.it
Please welcome author Diana Raab, PhD, to Writer Unboxed today! Diana’s latest book, Writing for Bliss: A Seven-Step Program for Telling Your Story and Transforming Your Life, is geared towar…
Judith van Praag's insight:
I don't have a ritual for writing. The sacred place is in my head. 

The interview with author Diana Raab triggered memories of way back. Her book Writing for Bliss should be a welcome guide for beginners and/ or academics who want to add more jazz and soulful writing to their work. Writing for Bliss in itself offers an interesting combination; the book reads like a PhD student's memoir; a hybrid form, addressed at word smiths, and dedicated to the healing art of creative writing. 

Years ago, as a touring theater person, I wrote on the run a lot. When I started taking note of what needed to be noted, my sacred spot was mostly on "the throne" as provincial Dutch folks call the WC (water closet) or toilet. The only place where people would leave me in peace. Mind you, in Europe you won't see a space around the door that allows others to spot you while you're going about your business. 

In the very beginning I wrote on scraps of paper, anything that would hold some words. A traveling friend turned me on to tiny little notebooks, ones you can slip into your pants' pocket. Different times called for different sizes, I have rows of black and red Chinese notebooks, but I've always preferred handy spiral ones, and I'm partial to a specific French brand. 

I've had rooms of my own for decades, and for practical purposes usually stick to the seat at my desk, but I love thumbing my words on my small iPhone, and that, yes, that I still take into the bathroom, albeit just my own. I no longer write in public ones, perhaps because that's what they are in the U.S., too public for comfort.


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The Riches of Owning Your Own Time - Insomnia? What Insomnia?

The Riches of Owning Your Own Time - Insomnia? What Insomnia? | Write On! | Scoop.it
Musicians often find sleeplessness inspiring as well as tormenting. Dorian Lynskey explains how Matt Berry wrote his new album during nocturnal sessions, and why Dave Bayley of Glass Animals owes his career to insomnia
Judith van Praag's insight:
If not driven by other people's schedule I'm not bothered by waking up around 3 a.m. The quiet of the night is a favorite time to be up and about, so is working into the wee hours. What is insomnia, but time to yourself, if you can embrace it? 

Click on the link and then find the link to SoundCloud with Matt Berry's Music for Insomniacs. If it doesn't put you to sleep, it can make for great soundtrack to your creative groove.
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Three Act Plot Structure in Detail

Three Act Plot Structure in Detail | Write On! | Scoop.it
Michael Hiebert describes the three act plot structure in detail. Also known as the Hero's Journey or Mythic Structure, it provides a framework within which you can write any story.
Judith van Praag's insight:
You can never have enough explanations of the Three Act Plot Point Structure. I like how clearly Michael Hiebert differentiates between Inciting Incident and Plot Pivot Point in the introductory paragraph. The severe ups and downs in the graph also appeal to me. Dramatic highs and lows. 
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Charlie Dare's curator insight, December 11, 2017 2:13 AM
Begining Chorus middle Chorus End Chorus ~Structure. Story.
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How to Index Your Book (And Why I’ll Never Do It Again) – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

How to Index Your Book (And Why I’ll Never Do It Again) – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:
Kathleen Fitzpatrick makes a good argument for leaving indexing to professionals. That I enjoyed providing the index to my first book, published in 1999, may say something about my personality, the time I had at hand, or a combination of the two. 
And I relate to Fitzpatrick's, "...I was feeling a bit possessive of it [the first book], and a bit curious about the process, and so I decided to do it myself."
Read and be forewarned. 


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How To Find And Use Beta Readers More Efficiently

How To Find And Use Beta Readers More Efficiently | Write On! | Scoop.it
Every author needs to use beta readers before publishing a new book. Take notice of what they like, but also what they don't like. It is like road testing your book before you bring it to market.
Judith van Praag's insight:
Tom Chalmers' advice is sage, don't rely on your loved ones, your number one fans to be of real help. Unless they're serious writers or editors themselves. And even if they are, not all life partners make for good creative partners. 

Chose your beta readers wisely. Chalmers mentioned the target market, don't be afraid to ask a pro, someone in the field you're writing about to look at your manuscript, but don't let them have it until you're convinced you've done the best you can do. 

Some pros will run away with your idea, not to steal it, but to tell you what to do. Even thoughts you had yourself, but didn't work into your writing yet, may be claimed by them as theirs. 

Remember, you're the Alpha. Woof!
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Joanna Penn's Breakdown Of Book Sales By Format, Vendor, Genre, And Country. May 2016 – April 2017

Joanna Penn's Breakdown Of Book Sales By Format, Vendor, Genre, And Country. May 2016 – April 2017 | Write On! | Scoop.it
My company tax year runs May - April these figures are all based on revenue, the money that has actually come into my bank account. Here's a breakdown by vendor
Judith van Praag's insight:
Think about box sets, and I don't mean in the ring. The (heralded) Creative Pen owner Joanna Penn is one gregarious writer, and her generosity pays off. She shares what she knows (about among other things box sets), gives away some, sells more. 

Her latest endeavor took me back to the gym. Not literally, but in my mind. Remembering my early morning work-outs with personal trainer Seth, and how I told him repeatedly about a fitness and healthful eating book for writers. How to walk, talk, write in your head and put thoughts on paper later. 

Talk is cheap, and talk sometimes just remains that. But not for Joanna Penn. Last year she came out with The Healthy Writer. 

I have to admit, I cringed a bit. Once again I'd squandered my ideas, talked about them, didn't execute them, let them go into the universe. So be it. Creativity works that way. All across the nation, all across the globe the minds of creatives are occupied by similar thoughts. 

As Hector Vilche, one of the founding members of Taller Amsterdam (formerly known as Tallèr de Monte Video) said often "Ideas lie in the gutter for the picking, doing something with them is the trick."

To get back to The Creative Penn's breakdown of sales, I'm in awe of her presentation, take a look at the business of writing. It's not just about selling your book to a publisher. 
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I'm A Teenager And I Don't Like Young Adult Novels. Here's Why.

I'm A Teenager And I Don't Like Young Adult Novels. Here's Why. | Write On! | Scoop.it
I know it's an extremely unpopular opinion.
Judith van Praag's insight:
From a teenager's mind and pen to the ears and mind of the writer of YA novels.
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Kim Purcell, author of THIS IS NOT A LOVE LETTER, on the fire behind a book

Kim Purcell, author of THIS IS NOT A LOVE LETTER, on the fire behind a book | Write On! | Scoop.it
Writing and book blog: The best inside information and resources for writers of any genre and readers of young adult fiction, including secrets from popular authors, tips, how-to advice, and in-depth articles, plus giveaways, contests, literary agent and editor insight and much more
Judith van Praag's insight:
An author needs real drive and stamina to finish a book. Writing the first draft is only the beginning. Then there's the rewrite, the revision, another rewrite... succumbing to editorial critique, and so on and so forth. 
Therefor you need to feel passionate about something. 
As Kim Purcell says right off the bat: "This was the book I had to write." The seed was a real-life disappearance. Kim hopes readers would "... see their judgements regarding race, appearance, weight, mental illness, beauty, socio-economics, sexuality, and every other bias." As she had while writing.

Reading a sample of This Is Not A Love Letter made me hungry for more. The premise, the disappearance of a young African-Canadian man is disturbing, Kim Purcell's attention for detail and concern about her own and her readers' perception of prejudice makes for a smooth read. An important read I daresay after reading the interview and the sample. 
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Understanding Difference Between a Wish and a Goal - Leads to Motivation Insight

Understanding Difference Between a Wish and a Goal - Leads to Motivation Insight | Write On! | Scoop.it
Goals give you hope for the future, something to aim for. Wishes are not goals, they are fantasies, detached from reality. Do you know the difference?
Judith van Praag's insight:
To write a successful story you need to understand your character's motivation, goal and conflict (that ensues). In my search to find out what's the difference between motivation and goal, I hit upon an expose on the difference between a wish and a goal. Writers can learn bunches from corporate advisers. 

By learning what having a goal means, I come closer to understanding the meaning of motivation. This is deductive reasoning, kind of like Sherlock Holmes's P.I. method, or like solving a math problem. 

Click on the link to listen to Chris Farmer's PodCast. I'm hitting play for the third time. Can't hear enough of the good stuff. 
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20 Author Photos: Then and Now

20 Author Photos: Then and Now | Write On! | Scoop.it
One of my favorite things about skulking around old bookstores is the possibility of chancing upon a first edition of a beloved author's early work and looking
Judith van Praag's insight:
First and lasting impressions. 
I attended Donna Tartt's  presentation for her first book in Amsterdam in 1993, and she already sported the bob shown in the latest picture shown in this article. Her appearance had already changed since the earlier publicity shot. As for the book, I was never able to get into that story about students killing a peer. 
My own, at the time, still recent loss, may have had something to do with my inability to appreciate even a fictional tale of children taken the live of another mother's child. 
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The Winter - by Gerard Reve Presented for Free by the Paris Review

The Winter - by Gerard Reve Presented for Free by the Paris Review | Write On! | Scoop.it
The Paris Review is a literary magazine featuring original writing, art, and in-depth interviews with famous writers.
Judith van Praag's insight:
When the editors of the Paris Review make interviews from the archives available, and to your surprise there's an early story by the author formerly knows as Gerard Kornelis van het Reve, who dropped his middle name plus "van het" to become known as Gerard Reve. For those who are familiar with his oeuvre, I knew Ernst-Jan, who IRL claimed he was not the one in the books, but stood in for yet another whom I knew as a teacher. Such a small world, the land of my mother tongue. 
Here is The Winter, presented for free by the Paris Review.
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Inclusion Poets & Writers Directory Criteria

Inclusion Poets & Writers Directory Criteria | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:
As a writer of prose, or poetry you want to, no, you need to be recognized, and not just by your fan base; relatives, your friends in real life, or on Social Media platforms. To this extend, the organization behind the magazine Poets & Writers offers inclusion in their directory. 

Their criteria are strict, and in a way we can be thankful for that. They help us see who's for real and who's not. At least that's what a high bar suggests. And P&W's bar is relatively high. 

Read the criteria and shiver. If your publication record doesn't answer to the requirements, and you wish to be included, you better get on with it, start sending out material for publication that will help you be part of the P&W community. 

Scooped from the P&W website (where you can find calls from lit magazines for poetry and prose, or announcements of contests) points that count for listing (a total of 12 points is required): 

Each book of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction (personal essays or memoirs) (12 points) 
Each chapbook (6 points) 
Each work of fiction or creative nonfiction (personal essays or memoirs) published in a literary journal, anthology, or edited Web publication (2 points) 
Each spoken word performance (not readings) (2 points) 
Each poem published in a literary journal, anthology, or edited Web publication (2 points) 

BUT (and that's one hell of a big kick in the BUTT):

The following do not count as points for listing: 
 Journalism or scholarly texts (biography, history, how to, travel guides, book reviews) 
Publications from vanity presses such as International Library of Poetry, Poetry.com, Noble House Publishers or from other presses or publications that ask authors to pay all or some of the publishing costs 
Self-published work, or work from presses such as Publish America that do not offer authors standard book contracts, including, but not limited to, online entities like iUniverse.com, lulu.com, and AuthorHouse.com 
Writing for children under the age of 12 
Credits from publications that do not regularly publish poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiaction 
Work published by a journal, anthology, or press for which you make editorial decisions 
Plays or dramatic treatments 
Translations
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Expert tips for writing the best flash fiction - The Writer magazine

Expert tips for writing the best flash fiction - The Writer magazine | Write On! | Scoop.it
Flash fiction has never been hotter. Here’s our guide for how to write the best flash fiction, plus which magazines and small presses publish flash fiction.
Judith van Praag's insight:
Happy New Year Y'all!
Time to try something new, or give a short form a shot. 
Flash Fiction - Shortest of the shortest short stories. Read and learn from the pros. Shorts often leave the reader with something to muse on, a question mark. And if that doesn't ring true for the story itself, in my case it's always: How did the writer do that?

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Jewish Feminist Perspectives Reading List | Books for All Readers

Jewish Feminist Perspectives Reading List | Books for All Readers | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:
Embrace Forbidden Words.
Write ESL, or in your mother tongue, mention unmentionables. 
Unterzakhn is a fine example. 
Free those who are imprisoned by patriarchal restraint by sharing your experience. Own your wisdom, and spread love of the written and spoken word. Give a voice to those who are silenced. 

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‘She’s American royalty’: Hundreds line up to meet Hillary Clinton in Seattle

‘She’s American royalty’: Hundreds line up to meet Hillary Clinton in Seattle | Write On! | Scoop.it
Tuesday’s book signing was an opportunity for the former Democratic presidential nominee to make personal connections with her fans. Some people moved on quickly after shaking her hand, while others shared personal stories.
Judith van Praag's insight:
WHAT HAPPENED. 
Here's to her story, your story, my story. We've got to write it, share it, have it published or publish it ourselves. 

Yesterday I stood in line for hours, notwithstanding my nearly constant aerobic footwork my feet and legs hurt today, but I wouldn't have wanted to miss the slow motion Movement. 

The Movement, for that's what it was, and that's what made Dough Jones win in Alabama, and that's what made one Moore ride his horse back from whatever backwater he started out from, The Movement is what makes America, and what got me and hundreds of others shuffle our way to meet former Dem presidential nominee Hillary Rodham Clinton, and receive a copy of WHAT HAPPENED. So we can read for ourselves.

“How old are you?” Secretary Clinton asked a young girl, and “Thanks for bringing her,” to the girl’s mother. Then it was my turn. Eye to eye, with Hillary, my hand in hers. 
“So glad to meet you,” a firm, warm, dry handshake. 
How does she do it? Hundreds, over a thousand times, that radiant smile, a moment of connection. Arrival in a caravan of oversized SUVs. No nonsense, yet friendly security personnel, a smooth operation. 
Still in line, I wondered, what do you say, how does one address a former First Lady, a Senator, a woman of her stature? Similar thoughts went through my mind before I was introduced to Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands. 
“She wants to know your name, she shakes your hand,” a woman reports, after her turn. I’m prepared to do that. 
“Thank you for coming,” the woman who should’ve been president of the USA says, and I’m guided onward, handed a pre-paid book. 

I descend the stairs, light on my feet, and am only slightly sorry I didn’t make a photo of the orange bracelet that said “I’m with her.” 
Did she see my button "We Made History", half hidden under my scarf? Only I knew I had my Woman's Card and other proof of support in my pocket. 

After a gentle nudging I offer my wrist and the bracelet is cut off and dropped in a container. The atmosphere in the bookstore is jovial and joyful, people making photos of one another, holding up books. The woman who signed my copy as Hilary RC, is a stateswoman, I feel it in my fingertips.
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Some books aren’t meant to be sold - San Francisco Chronicle, 2017-11-21

Some books aren’t meant to be sold - San Francisco Chronicle, 2017-11-21 | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:
Rick Hoppe's column is good for some early morning chuckles, recommendable at the top of the day.
I might send a link to an octogenarian retired doctor of medicine who wrote down (this is of importance) his memories and then sought and found a publisher.
The MD didn't want to pay for an editor, proofreader (his wife could do that) or fact checker —on top of the publisher's payment. Checking facts didn't even cross his mind. Not until he gave a presentation at a book group meeting. 
The hostess told him without mincing words that he was wrong about everything he wrote about her husband. Most importantly, the crossing of The Channel during WWII from Portugal was not made possibly by his family's riches; gold or jewels. It was her father who had been a jeweler before being gassed in Auschwitz, not her husband's. 
Last night the author sent me an email. His book may be republished with another title. He'd been advised to have his book indexed with Microsoft Word software, and he wanted to know whether I use that software, or did I know someone who could do it [the indexing] for him? 
I sent him ProfHacker Kathleen Fitzpatrick's post "How to Index Your Book (and why I'll never do it again)", a YouTube instructional for amateur indexers, and suggested he'd take a look at the website of the American Society for Indexing, to locate a professional. 
Going by his track record, he'll do it himself, or he'll find a volunteer. 
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