World War II - English 9 - Trenton Rhodes
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World War II - English 9 - Trenton Rhodes
How survivors overcame the hardship and danger of war.
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The National WWII Museum | New Orleans: Learn: For Students

The National WWII Museum | New Orleans: Learn: For Students | World War II - English 9 - Trenton Rhodes | Scoop.it
Students can explore primary sources, oral histories, images, and documents about World War II and the Holocaust
Trenton Rhodes's insight:

       Franklin Delano Roosevelt used parallelism and repetition to make it seem more united, more safe, and more powerful. President Roosevelt wanted to assure the american people that we were safe and that our country would survive following the Pearl Harbor attack.“Hostilities exist. There is no blinking at the fact that our people, our territory and our interests are in grave danger. With confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph, so help us God” (Roosevelt). The key repetition that Roosevelt used does make all americans feel safer and easier to live another day. President Roosevelt's main goal was just to comfort and assure america that going into war is ok and that America will prevail. “No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people in their righteous might will win through to absolute victory.”(Roosevelt). Franklin Delano Roosevelt was guaranteeing that America would not only survive after this attack, but America would ever win World War 2.

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War time and lack of money!

Taxes and bonds!

 

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3427300242&v=2.1&u=valp86534&it=r&p=GPS&sw=w

Trenton Rhodes's insight:

      Parallelism is the form a rhetoric that Sydney L. Pash used to dramatize the effect of the presidents choice on raise money for the war. The thought of another World War had President Franklin Delano Roosevelt decide on the unsupported option of raising taxes and selling bonds. “The president, on the one hand, was reluctant to vest the authority needed to control the wartime economy with any single person or agency. Isolationists, on the other hand, harangued the administration when it attempted to better prepare the nation for conflict”(Pash). The parallelism that Pash uses, make a visual representation of the president weighing out the best way to solve the economy issue. Pash even states every form of tax that was enforce, just to make that all the newly adopted taxes seem like a drastic leap. “It also financed the war by transforming the tax code with the Revenue Act of 1942. Reflecting the progressive tax laws of World War I, this act raised the corporate, estate, excess profits, and gift taxes”(Pash). The increase amount of data on the subject caused the topic to appear as a bigger deal than what it really was.

 

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Address to Congress, 1945

President Truman's Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress.
April 16, 1945

Trenton Rhodes's insight:

       President Truman's use of pathos as a rhetorical device in his address to congress made the reader feel sympathetic towards the men involved in WW2 and the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. This also showed the desperate sense of optimism by stating that they must carry on and only look forward."Tragic fate has thrust upon us grave responsibilities. We must carry on. Our departed leader never looked backward. He looked forward and moved forward. That is what he would want us to do. That is what America will do"(Truman). This statement was very inspirational and have the american people a sense that we are united, we are strong enough, and we will prevail. It helped us to spring forward into action, but our action will be one step towards peace.”We have learned to fight with other nations in common defense of our freedom. We must now learn to live with other nations for our mutual good”(Truman). Truman realised that the best way for america to survive is to create peace.

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A Pearl Harbor survivor's incredible story

A Pearl Harbor survivor's incredible story | World War II - English 9 - Trenton Rhodes | Scoop.it

 

"For 70 years Glenn Lane eagerly shared his memories of the Japanese ambush on Pearl Harbor with friends, family, schoolchildren and anyone else who wanted to hear the tale of how he survived attacks on two battleships that fateful day." -Lee Ross

Trenton Rhodes's insight:

       Ross's purpose is to help the audience understand her feelings about how Glenn Lane survived that way, and the rhetorical device Ross used in the Fox News article was irony. Lane did not consider himself as some hero, but other people he met did."He never called himself a hero... People would always go, 'oh, you're such a hero"(Ross). The way that Ross writes this make it seem as if Glenn Lane is modest about being a war hero, but he is actually not trying to take credit at all. "'no, the heroes are still down in the ship.'"(Ross). Lane believes that he is not worthy of being titled as a hero, because that would put him on the same level as the other brave men around him.

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Survivors Relive December 7, 1941 - World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

Survivors Relive December 7, 1941 - World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument | World War II - English 9 - Trenton Rhodes | Scoop.it
Survivors Relive December 7, 1941
Trenton Rhodes's insight:

         The author of this story used both a hyperbole and a rhetorical question to prove the severity of how often the veterans were left with just questioning themselves. Most veterans struggled to even tackle the concept of why they were questioning themselves.The author had realized how hard it was on the veterans and he noted this, “left them wrestling the immutable question”(NPS). Most veterans just sat there and ponder that for years, and the hyperbole increase the strength of wrestling the question.. It was rare that a veteran could answer anything that was about themselves. ‘“-why me?”’(NPS). They veterans asked this but they knew the answer, they did take part in tragic pearl harbor, but they also survived.

 

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A World Gone Mad!

Peoples everyday life has toubles.

 http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA310867620&v=2.1&u=valp86534&it=r&p=GPS&sw=w

Trenton Rhodes's insight:

       The rhetorical device used in “Eyewitness to World War II: The Epic Story of History's Greatest Conflict” is a hyperbole and metaphor, and his purpose for talking about the state of self destructiveness that the world was in, increase the feeling of anger between the Axis and Allies. Any country will always struggle with the violence that war brings, and that can make the world fill with anger. "A world gone mad"(Tosko). Michael Tosko looked at world war 2 with a wide perspective and realize how little sanity was left in the world that is could get to the point of a world war. Anyone that lived through this era struggled to survive, world war 2 swallowed up everyone on its track. For example, “from low-ranking soldiers to top generals, from Allied to Axis, from civilians on the home front to those caught in the war's path”(Tosko). Tosko does a great job of identifying how life was then and also the exasperation of the world in that era.


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