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Rescooped by Danielle Boucher from Geography Education!

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | World Regional Geography |
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

Rescooped by Danielle Boucher from Geography Education!

A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | World Regional Geography |
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.


The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 

Via Seth Dixon
David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:58 AM

These two images are rather striking. They depict seventeen years in the life a young female Afghani refuge. They depict seventeen years of hell. The woman in this photograph has lived a hard life. Seventeen years probably feels like fifty years to her. On her face, you see the effects of living a life as a refugee. A life of not having a true home or place that you can count on. A life of living in deplorable refugee camps. It is the shame of the world, that people are forced to live like this. Unfortunately this women's story is an all to common occurrence in Afghanistan. Thousands have suffered similar fates in refugee camps. We must never forget the suffering of these people.

Alexis Rickey's curator insight, February 28, 3:56 PM
In 1984, National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry captured an image that peaked the world's interest. The photo, of a then young 17 year old Afghan refugee, who's name was unknown at the time, was featured on the cover of a National Geographic magazine back in June 1985. Her eyes foreshadow the hardships she endured, and still does, within her country's war-filled land. 17 years later, McCurry was able to found out who this mystery girl is, and not only learn her name, but learn her story as well. 
Rescooped by Danielle Boucher from Geography Education!

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | World Regional Geography |
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

Via Seth Dixon
Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 2:45 PM

Looks like President Enrique Nieto has shifted tactics in Mexico's fight against the drug trade. When he won election from Felipe Calderon he changed the way he portrayed his country. No more would he parade alleged drug dealers and overlords before they went to trial. This would only infuriate the drug lords and they sought revenge by seeking out police to either kill, or bribe, further deteriorating the uneasy truce between the government and the drug trade. By keeping this off the news and promoting Mexico's other needs such as trade, education reform, and reduction of poverty.

The mass killings have been kept mostly out of the spotlight and the body count is still the same, but Nieto can now fight this fight largely out of the public's eye. The drug related killings have moved to the northern territories away from cameras and the public. This should afford him opportunity to focus on this problem and keep the public from thinking Armageddon is around the corner.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 29, 2015 2:38 PM

Mexico is a country that is still dealing with gangs and violence throughout the entire country. Gangs from Los Zetas to Los Sinaloas are constantly search of more power and reign over territories in Mexico. This article simply describes that the efforts against violence and drugs have not been resolved in the country, but it has got "quieter" in regards of violence against military or police officials. Between 2007 to 2012 attacks on military officials increased but recently they have been diminishing. The gangs have realized that having a war against military officials only brings more attention to them. The gangs are still fighting each other, but are not bombing or having urban gun battles in the middle of 'loud' cities. 

Big boarder cities like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez murder rate has dropped 80% since 2010. The question is, where are is the violence and attacks of cartel vs. cartel taking place? The area of battle is now in Torreon. This city of manufacturing, mining, and farming, is now one of the most dangerous cities in Mexico due to gang violence. It makes sense to draw attention to a city where industries are important. Another reason for the battles is because its the area between Los Zetas and Los Sinoloas territory. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:34 PM

It is interesting to know that the drug cartel violent s has slowly been decreasing from public views. Violence from the war on drugs on the Mexico border with the United States has been a huge issue for a while post 9/11. They are finally trying to avoid conflicts with the government, specifically the military and police  because it will only bring more pressure to them. It is a smart thing to keep violence of the streets but out in places where there the cartels can draw less attention, murders and trafficking still exist. It is important to understand that a huge problem like this does not just vanished completely, but changes overtime and shift to other quiet places.