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More Britons know about US Declaration of Independence than Magna Carta, survey shows

More Britons know about US Declaration of Independence than Magna Carta, survey shows | World History | Scoop.it
More Britons have heard of the US Declaration of Independence than have heard of the Magna Carta, a survey commissioned to launch the 800th anniversary celebrations of the bedrock of democracy has found.

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The Black Death: Bubonic Plague

The Black Death: Bubonic Plague | World History | Scoop.it

Via Joy Kinley
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Karina Rivera's comment, February 3, 2014 4:00 PM
This about the bubonic plague and where it come from. They first found it in the 1900 in china. it is from the midevil times they way you know you had the scary plauge is if you started to get red bumps on your body. The plauge came from anmails and fleas but then started to be found on people! The plague wiped out most of europe population. My reaction to this is why was it not all around the world because there are fleas everywhere?
Kaitlyn Wilt's comment, April 30, 2014 7:40 PM
In the 1330s an outbreak of deadly bubonic plague occurred in China. The bubonic plague mainly affects rodents, but fleas can transmit the disease to people. Once people are infected, they infect others very rapidly. Plague causes fever and a painful swelling of the lymph glands called buboes, which is how it gets its name. The disease also causes spots on the skin that are red at first and then turn black. n winter the disease seemed to disappear, but only because fleas--which were now helping to carry it from person to person--are dormant then. Each spring, the plague attacked again, killing new victims. After five years 25 million people were dead--one-third of Europe's people.Even when the worst was over, smaller outbreaks continued, not just for years, but for centuries. The survivors lived in constant fear of the plague's return, and the disease did not disappear until the 1600s. I think this was one of the worst diseases. I feel bad for the people who had to live through this.
Brian sedano's comment, March 9, 2016 9:13 PM
This aricle about the black death known as the bubonic plague. It started in Italy 1347. It was caused by rats and flees. The disease spread with terrible speed. Fathers abandoned their sick sons. friars and nuns were left to care for the sick. Killed one third of the European population. 1300s peasant revolts broke out in england france belgium and italy. but in the winter the disease seemed to disappear. Overall this article was very cool, i really enjoyed it!
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Scientists reconstruct Black Death genetic code - what could possibly go wrong?

Scientists reconstruct Black Death genetic code - what could possibly go wrong? | World History | Scoop.it

The genetic code of the germ that caused the Black Death has been reconstructed in the lab.


Via No Such Thing As The News
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Chris Mallon's comment, February 10, 2013 3:54 PM
Oh excellent, I always said we should HASTEN THE APOCALYPSE
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The Crusades (Full length Documentary hosted by Terry Jones)

Great documentary on The Crusades hosted by Monty Python's Terry Jones.
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Forget Crimewatch – the Vikings were there first |

Forget Crimewatch – the Vikings were there first | | World History | Scoop.it

We think of Vikings as highly aggressive raiders who ravished Europe in the Early Middle Ages but how could these men be controlled when they returned to their homeland after plundering other countries?

 

A researcher from the University of Aberdeen, who presented today at the British Science Festival, suggested this is a problem Viking societies themselves were deeply concerned about – so much so that they took on the role of early criminal profilers – drafting descriptions of the most likely trouble-makers.

So what do you make of this?  Is this a society looking for trouble?  OR  Looking for those who cause trouble?


Via David Connolly
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Gargoyles and the Grotesque in Medieval Architecture

Gargoyles and the Grotesque in Medieval Architecture | World History | Scoop.it

Introduction: During the Medieval Ages religion was one of the most important aspects of daily life. Havens of worship had been around for years previous to cathedrals but during the Middle Ages one will notice that churches became increasingly grandiose. These cathedrals were built as a place of worship, the house of God and as a shelter for the relics of holy figures. This time period was dubbed by historians as the Age of Faith, therefore the churches were the most important structures (Medieval Culture). Cathedrals built during the Gothic period were by far the most decorative of all Medieval architecture. They became increasingly decorative since the Romanesque. Characteristics such as pointed arches, flying buttresses, and elaborate stained glass windows were common during this period. ...


Via M. A. Schweitzer
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Middle Ages (historical era)

Middle Ages (historical era) | World History | Scoop.it
The period in European history from the collapse of Roman civilization in the 5th century ce to the period of the Renaissance (variously interpreted as beginning in the 13th, 14th, or 15th century, depending...
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The Dark Ages...How Dark Were They, Really?: Crash Course World History #14

John Green teaches you about the so-called Dark Ages, which it turns out weren't as uniformly dark as you may have been led to believe. While Europe was inde...
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The Black Death is dead (thanks to evolution)

The Black Death is dead (thanks to evolution) | World History | Scoop.it

Centuries-old DNA reveals the source of the Black Death: a bacterial strain that is now apparently extinct. Evolution explains why.

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Rail project finds 'Black Death' pit

Rail project finds 'Black Death' pit | World History | Scoop.it
Excavations for the Crossrail project in London reveal 13 bodies in a burial ground believed to date from the early days of the Black Death.

Via David Connolly
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Scientists reconstruct Black Death genetic code - what could possibly go wrong?

Scientists reconstruct Black Death genetic code - what could possibly go wrong? | World History | Scoop.it

The genetic code of the germ that caused the Black Death has been reconstructed in the lab.


Via No Such Thing As The News
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Chris Mallon's comment, February 10, 2013 3:54 PM
Oh excellent, I always said we should HASTEN THE APOCALYPSE
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The Crusades ("Eyes Without a Face" by Billy Idol)

Scenes from "Kingdom of Heaven" and a documentary.
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Nag on the Lake: Wound Man, c.1400s

Nag on the Lake: Wound Man, c.1400s | World History | Scoop.it

“Wound Man" is an illustration which first appeared in European surgical texts in the Middle Ages. It laid out schematically the various wounds a person might suffer in battle or in accidents”


Via David Connolly
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Crusades (Christianity)

Crusades (Christianity) | World History | Scoop.it
Military expeditions, beginning in the late 11th century, that were organized by Western Christians in response to centuries of Muslim wars of expansion. Their objectives were to check the spread of Islam,...
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The Crusades - Pilgrimage or Holy War?: Crash Course World History #15

In which John Green teaches you about the Crusades embarked upon by European Christians in the 12th and 13th centuries. Our traditional perception of the Cru...
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