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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | World Geography | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."


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Ryan G Soares's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:25 AM

Very Nice Photography.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:05 PM

this is amazing!

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Maps 101: Geography News Network

Maps 101: Geography News Network | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Introducing Geography News Network. Global culture, science, history and political stories have become a key component of Maps101 through weekly stories and associated lesson plans. This year sees the addition of 5 brand new authors bringing engaging stories from a range of perspectives."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2013 2:32 PM

I am delighted to announce that I will be one of the new authors that will be writing for Maps 101's newest educational platform: the Geography News Network.  Many schools and districts across the country have subscriptions to this online service that provides thousands of supplemental materials and lesson plans for geography, earth science, history and social studies teachers.  If your school district does not currently have a subscription, you can sign up for a free trial subscription.

Amélie Silvert's curator insight, September 5, 2013 4:08 PM

Geography into perspective.

Sandy Montoya's comment, September 8, 2013 12:38 PM
I believe it is very important for viewers to watch such channels. You get a chance to learn about other cultures around the world and relate them to themselves and the world around them. It is a great educational site.
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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | World Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

James Piccolino's curator insight, January 31, 6:41 PM
The link to this doesn't work, but I managed to search it out.Some of these terms are really out there. I thought I knew a lot of these but I was mistaken. One thing I am not surprised by is the fact that I do not follow all of the Rhode Island/ New England lines. I seem to not have an accent like many have here, apparently I can add vocabulary to that list. I actually say many of the terms that go with other areas of the US.
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This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies"

This Pittsburgh restaurant only serves food from America's "enemies" | World Geography | Scoop.it
Conflict Kitchen is the only restaurant in the world that serves cuisine solely from countries with which the U.S. is in conflict.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:26 PM

Any Ethnic conflicts here HUGGERS?

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:04 PM

Initially I wasn't really sure what I thought about this resturant. My initial reaction was that I hated it and thought it was a bad idea. I to seemed like we were supporting another country by serving their food. However there is a cultural experience involved when we go out to eat. Many people go out to italian resturants to get the experience of italy and etc. However after really thinking about it the US is typically in conflict with another countries government, not the people who live there. By selling the food of countries we are in conflict with almost gives us an idea about what exactly the culture is there. I think it almost educates people in such a way. I think that might be the purpose on the resturant. By eating at this resturant it opens peoples eyes to what people of that particular country are consuming on a regular day basis. That experience can be good or bad, but either way it still opens up peoples eyes to the type of world other countries are living in. I think by eating there you open yourslef up to a new cultural experience, which I belive is exactly the point that the kitchen is trying to serve. Even if it is through food. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:06 PM

Conflict Kitchen serves foods from the countries the United States is in conflict with. They might be doing this to show Americans a little bit of how their culture is b eating their foods. 

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The Authoritative Map


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:26 PM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:04 AM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | World Geography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | World Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3-- use in class

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The Geography of Home

The Geography of Home | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Whenever I am living abroad, people always say the same thing, insisting that I am très Américain. Sometimes it's the words I use, or the way I talk.  But back in America, a strange thing happens. People say I have a British accent; they insist I have a European quality."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 6, 2013 2:40 PM

For those who have lived abroad, the sense of belonging to one place is elusive.  This article is a great look at personal geographies and how individuals negotiate belonging to multiple communities.  Increasingly, people live in many places throughout their lives;  some cultures are intensely connected to particular places but some are highly mobile.     


Questions to Ponder: What does it mean to belong in a place? What are some barriers to belonging?  Are some places easier to belong to?  How come?    


Tags: place, culture.

Katherine Burk's comment, September 6, 2013 4:01 PM
I find this interesting as the number story for Cincinnati, Ohio is how Cincinnati isn't as inclusive as it should be despite their hospitality and "niceness". http://cin.ci/1ek8LvX As someone that has traveled and also grew up near Cincinnati. I understand the difficulty in approaching new groups.
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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | World Geography | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 2016 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 2017 11:31 PM

Helps connects the past to the present.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 9, 10:06 AM

Très original ! Site en anglais

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | World Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.