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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | World Geography | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

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Revolutionary War Infographic

Revolutionary War Infographic | World Geography | Scoop.it

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 19, 2013 12:26 PM

Thought infographics were a recent invention? Think again!  This chronological table of the Revolutionary War shows how and when different states were involved.  Great primary source!

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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | World Geography | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 2016 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 2017 11:31 PM

Helps connects the past to the present.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 9, 10:06 AM

Très original ! Site en anglais

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In the Beginning Was the Word; Now the Word Is on an App - NYTimes

In the Beginning Was the Word; Now the Word Is on an App - NYTimes | World Geography | Scoop.it
With more than 100 million downloads, YouVersion, a free app that offers over 600 Bible translations, has found itself in the company of successful start-ups like Instagram and Dropbox.

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Lisa Neely's curator insight, July 27, 2013 1:41 PM

This is a great app. It also has many Bible studies to choose from to help immerse yourself in the Word!

Donna Clark's curator insight, August 6, 2013 5:48 PM

This might be helpful for individuals--or for teachers in a school sponsored by a religious organization.  Great article!

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Using Google Earth in the Classroom - LiveBinder

Google Earth is a great cross curricular tool to use in the classroom. You will find many resources for getting started or going deeper here!

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, June 26, 2013 2:50 PM

Tons of ideas for teachers on how to use Google Earth in the classroom - and not just in geography classes, either!

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Teachers Homepage | National Geographic Education

National Geographic Education brings geography, social studies and science to life. Using real-world examples and National Geographic's rich media, educators, families, and students learn about the world and the people in it.

 

Click headline to access the website, which is full of resources--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Online Math Games, Logic Games, Science Games, Language Arts Games, and more!

Online Math Games, Logic Games, Science Games, Language Arts Games, and more! | World Geography | Scoop.it
Online learning games featuring math games, science games, logic games, and language arts games. SchoolTimeGames.com - The Smart Place to Be!

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Catherine Douthard's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:24 AM

Fun learning!

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, February 18, 2014 4:03 PM

Lots of fun online learning games. Great for parents and teachers working with young learners.

Miguel Garcia's curator insight, February 19, 2014 5:52 AM

algunos estan muy buenos

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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | World Geography | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."

 

Tags: mapping, historical, cartography.


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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

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World Landmarks Puzzles

World Landmarks Puzzles | World Geography | Scoop.it
Learn about the world's 50 most incredible landmarks!

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Deb
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eduPLEX's comment, January 18, 2013 6:10 AM
Hey Ana, That's a nice find. Thanks.
Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, January 18, 2013 10:41 AM
Glad you like it eduPLEX!
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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | World Geography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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Map


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Luis Aguilar Cruz's curator insight, July 2, 2013 2:50 AM

Bienvenue à l'expérience map

ethne staniland's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:57 PM

very good

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:29 PM

While technology does has its pros it also comes with its cons. GPS batteries can die; the map on the screen may be unreadable due to size, the GPS itself could break if not handled properly. When it comes to maps, it is durable and legible in any position. However, I can not read a map while driving my car to a certain place. It is rather difficult to find a place when i'm in unfamiliar territory. In this case the GPS is able to direct me to where i need to be. If handled properly, the GPS is, at least in my opinion, better than the map. However, it is nice to keep and extra map in the glove compartment, just in case. 

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African Online Digital Library - Portal Page

African Online Digital Library - Portal Page | World Geography | Scoop.it

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:38 AM

The African Online Digital Library (AODL) is a portal to multimedia collections about Africa. MATRIX, working in cooperation with the African Studies Center at Michigan State University, is partnering with universities and cultural heritage organizations in Africa to build this resource. Plans are underway to add digital tools in order to enable scholars to work with and add to these materials. Individuals and organizations interested in contributing to the African Online Digital Library are invited to contact us.