world geography
33 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 2015 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The United States' Geographic Situation

The Greater Mississippi Basin is the United States' core and serves as the underpinning of its role as a global superpower. For more analysis, visit: http://...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, April 20, 2015 8:51 PM

Think about the units and topics  we've covered this year. Migration, urbanization, development, and geo-political theories. Use examples from all of the above to justify the statement that the geography of the United States is responsible for its role as a global superpower.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:14 PM

This video contains a nice overview of the United States' geography. This bi-coastal country has the ability to access to a wide variety of trades from Europe and Asia. Along with the self-sufficient interior breadbasket region and coastline, it explains why U.S became such a major superpower in the 20th century. Understanding United States geography is an important skill to know when studying History. As a student of History I find this video very informative. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 8:30 PM
I personally do not agree with the name "The United States' Geographical challenge," because to me is seems as if geographically we have a great set up, as the video said we are insulated by two oceans with naturally indented deep harbors and because of the Mississippi River Basin, we have the naturally interconnected system that allows us transport goods for cheap and to supply itself efficiently. it also nice to know that because of our advantages, we have what other countries do not and have a protection with the help of our Navy.
Scooped by jim mcdougle
Scoop.it!

Wargaming: computerized scenario planning

Stratfor conducted extensive scenario planning when considering Russia's offensive military options toward Ukraine. In this video some of the broader themes and deduction will be examined.
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 17, 2015 4:24 PM

Scooped by eth Dixon
onto Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance

Daniel Rasmus's curator insight, March 19, 2015 6:37 PM

Interesting exploration of what Russia might do in Eastern Europe. Great examples of scenario planning - facts and how things might work. Eliminate the impossible and reveal the real options.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 2015 9:05 PM

Technology can be useful when designing strategies and making political decisions when war hits countries. War-gaming can be helpful for Ukraine and even for Russian governments on how to refine their military and political strategies during war. It simulates the question &what if& and can be tested without being hazardous for any one. In fact, war-gaming integrates all possibilities of how and what things can be done and also can narrow to a few options. Computerized animation models help and allow for the construction and display of a lot of options of how things can be done and what can not be. War-gaming can even be useful in predicting what may be happen in the near future.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Imagining Continental Drift

"This animated documentary tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2015 9:04 PM

While plate tectonics is now universally accepted, when Alfred Wegener first proposed continental drift it was it was greeted with a great deal of skepticism from the academic community.  This video nicely shows how scientific advancement requires exploration and imagination, and whole lot of heart.   


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, K12STEM, video.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 20, 2015 12:47 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

9 questions about the Israel-Palestine conflict you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about the Israel-Palestine conflict you were too embarrassed to ask | world geography | Scoop.it
Yes, one of the questions is "Why are Israelis and Palestinians fighting?"

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 1:02 PM

This story of the Palestinians, Israel, Arabs, and Jews has its roots in Germany at the hands of one of the worst dictators the world has ever seen, Adolf Hitler. His ethnic cleansing of Jews via torture, the gas chamber, and starvation, is one of the bleakest times in recorded humanity. The remaining Jews were a people without a land and so it was agreed that Israel would be formed to provide a safe haven. However the land has been disputed, fought over, and the borders changed so many times that it no longer resembles the initial attempt to provide a refuge for the Jews. Ironically, 700,000 Palestinians had been displaced initially and now number 7,000,000 according to the article; all of them designated as refugees. There is no solve for the problems between the Arabs, Jews, Palestinians and Israel as too much blood has been spilled, and forgiveness is a forgotten word. How do you apologize or forgive for generations of bloodshed, displaced families, borders that constantly change, and religions that contradict one another? I'm glad that I wake every day in the USA. We have our own issues to resolve, but nothing approaches the contradictions and paradoxes this area of the world must live with every day.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:07 AM

A good refresher for teachers and a start for students

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:25 PM

Its interesting to see another side to the story and what barriers are now in place from the two opposing cultures.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can India become a superpower?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:29 AM

If you were to ask me before watching this video, i would say absolutely. They have the capability because they are full of intelligent people, they also have enough people to do it. Something is just holding them back from moving forward...

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 3:15 PM

I really enjoyed this video; it's packed with a lot of information, but all of it is relevant to its main discussion of India as a potential superpower. In class, we discussed the importance of the Mississippi River Valley and the Great Lakes Basin played in the development of the US economy and the rise of the US as a global superpower, and this does not differ very much from the intricate river systems that litter the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River Valley has historically been home to millions of people, facilitating agricultural development as well as trade. The lack of natural boundaries within the nation has allowed for the diffusion of the thousands of different cultures, customs, religions, and languages that find their home within India, although this has lead to division amongst its people. Internal disputes have paved the way for foreign leaders to seize control of the subcontinent, as evidenced by the Mughal Empire, and the eventual control of India by the British. Independence has lead to huge political and economic developments, as well as forming a distinct national identity that has, so far, risen above the petty sectionalist and race-related squabbles of yesteryear, but sectional rivalries continue to be had between the various Indian states. All the tools needed to become a superpower are at India's disposal; all it must do is seize the opportunity.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:48 AM

anyone who doesn't think that India can become a superpower is insane. they already are one. they have nukes. they have a billion people. they have massive industry, and they have a history of conflict with their neighbors.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Recent Developments in the Ukraine Conflict

"Stratfor Military Analysts Paul Floyd and Sim Tack discuss how Russia's strategy will maintain options as violence in eastern Ukraine continues."

 

Tags: Ukraine, conflict, geopolitics, political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 9, 2015 11:28 PM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 6:15 PM

I cant believe the cease fire lasted all but 40 minutes!  Putin and Russia are a bunch of scumbags that are just looking for conflict.  As if Russia is not large enough that they have to scrap for these small areas of Ukraine.  Its going to be because of assholes like this that get other countries involved and many lives end up getting lost.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:46 PM

Unit 4 :

Russia beginning to take violent actions against the Ukraine. It is interesting to view the military strategies that countries take, and to see the outcomes of these schemes. 

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 2015 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Golden Temple of Amristar

"The Golden Temple is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. It is also home to one of the largest free eateries in the world. Read the related article."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:33 PM

The Golden Temple of Amristar, located in the northern Punjab region of India, is renowned as the holiest shrine in the Sikh religion. 80,000 -160,000 people come here each day to enjoy a free eatery on top of prayer. This is the largest free eatery in the world. What an unbelievable idea that this huge number of people can enjoy free food. Food is cooked up by workers in large vats in order to feed the masses. This is not a homeless shelter, there was a man in this video who said he was from a prominent family and he can to the temple because he felt peace of mind here. The temple is covered in glitter and gold hence its name.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 2015 10:53 AM

I think this idea is excellent. Sikhism is a blend of Islam and Hinduism.  They believe that everyone is equal and strive for peace and tranquility.  The Golden Temple is, essentially, a place to go to get away from the fast-paced and cut-throat environment of everyday-life.  They accept all races and religions.  I love this model and idea.  I hope the Sikhs gain more attention and spread their simple idea of peace, love, and volunteerism.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 7, 2015 8:29 AM

This video provides some valuable insight into a religion that not many people know about. Sikhism combines elements of Hinduism and Islam, but rejects the Hindu concept of a caste system. It is practiced predominantly in the Punjab region of India, but practicing Sikhs can be found around the world. The Golden Temple of Amristar is one of Sikhism's most important holy sites, and adherents of any religion are welcome at the temple. There is a large community kitchen inside the temple, where volunteers produce tens of thousands of meals for temple visitors everyday. Everyone who visits the temple sits and eats together in the community eatery, as Sikhs believe all people are equal, and so they are not concerned with separating visitors by gender, race, or religion.

 

Sikhism and its Golden Temple are really interesting examples of cross-cultural pollination. While it is not unusual to see cultures adapt elements of fashion or music from other cultures, it is unusual to see one culture fuse its religion with another. Generally, religion is seen as a concrete ideology with immutable truths that should not be disturbed or tampered with. Sikhism sheds this rigidity and incorporates elements of two major religions into one, creating a religion of peace, equality, and tolerance. This is the ideal of any religion, and Sikhism exhibits wonderfully. The Punjab region of India acts as a melting pot for Hinduism and Islam, creating a geographic center for ideologies that reach far beyond their geographic origins. Though Sikhism is a small religion compared to Islam or Hinduism, it provides a fascinating and excellent example of how cultures can come together peacefully to create something new and positive. 

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

"Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.
Related Article: http://nyti.ms/gSvOkM"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today. 

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed.   

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 20, 12:18 PM
The Soviet Union's command and control economy allowed totally impractical industrial ventures like a paper mill on Lake Baikal to exist. This mill only served to employ workers and produce a good that would be sold at a set cost where profit is irrelevant. However, the mill's location away from any industrial center or shipping hub made the operation of such an isolated factory in a capitalistic economy totally unfeasible. Also, factors such as the environmental perfection of the lake's ecosystem adds additional pressure to cease operations. What can function in the Soviet Union does not always survive the forces of political and economic changes. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 2:38 AM
This shines a light on a couple of different issues.  First, the economic implications of monotowns.  Monotowns are towns with planned formal economies that are based on one industry.  Other, small businesses pop up to cater to the needs of the people who work in that central industry.  These monotowns were utilized throughout the Soviet Union, and some survive today.  One example of such a town is Baikalsk, a town on Lake Baikal that is centered around a paper mill.  The economic well-being of every resident of Baikalsk--the mill's employees, their families, and the owners of small businesses in the town-- is based in the success of the paper mill.  But on the other hand, the process of paper making has been polluting Lake Baikal for decades, which has led to environmentalists campaigning for the mill to be closed.
Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Earth From the ISS

"Watch along with Expedition 38 crew members Mike Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio as they look at various cities across the globe from the vantage point of the cupola on board the International Space Station."  

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, images, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The most famous trips in history

The most famous trips in history | world geography | Scoop.it

"An interactive map to explore history's greatest journeys, from Magellan to Kerouc." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Carmen Arias 's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:41 PM

Interesting!

David Baker's curator insight, October 27, 2014 1:15 PM

I shared this with many social studies teachers. Helping students to explore interactively is a great tool to build interest and gain perspective.

Treathyl Fox's comment, February 24, 2016 1:51 PM
WOW! Cheap travel and vacation. Fun, educational and can go there right from your laptop! Two thumbs up for this share.
Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:13 AM


Chapter 5

Humans value, change and protect landscapes

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resources, political ecology.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sunnis and Shiites

Sunnis and Shiites | world geography | Scoop.it
Clarissa Ward breaks down the history of differences between opposing sects of Islam

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:58 PM

The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge.  


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culture.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, April 14, 2015 10:51 AM

Since Obama turmoil with his absurd Arab Spring, Sunni Shite are killing one the other like crazy Islamist

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:07 PM

There is a very complicated history between two major religions in the Middle East. History shows how this religion was divided by Mohamed’s death. It turned into a totally new religion and now rivals in the Middle East. I have to mention that one of my co-workers is from Syria and his definition about Sunnis and Shiites are not open minded. The history behind the Muslims religions demonstrate that the more power they have the more places they will dominate. Furthermore, human rights are violated regardless of religious denomination. For some people, Sunnis are considered as terrorist and compared to extremist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. These people who do not want to implement any kind of technology in their countries are holding on to the past with their religion. However, the Shiites experience more freedom even though they still follow strict religious rules. Even the US is confused about these Middle Eastern religions as countries that used to be governed by Sunnis now are run by Shiites. The US needs to remain neutral regarding these religious changes.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from world geography
Scoop.it!

Recent Developments in the Ukraine Conflict

"Stratfor Military Analysts Paul Floyd and Sim Tack discuss how Russia's strategy will maintain options as violence in eastern Ukraine continues."

 

Tags: Ukraine, conflict, geopolitics, political.


Via Seth Dixon, jim mcdougle
more...
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 9, 2015 11:28 PM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 6:15 PM

I cant believe the cease fire lasted all but 40 minutes!  Putin and Russia are a bunch of scumbags that are just looking for conflict.  As if Russia is not large enough that they have to scrap for these small areas of Ukraine.  Its going to be because of assholes like this that get other countries involved and many lives end up getting lost.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:46 PM

Unit 4 :

Russia beginning to take violent actions against the Ukraine. It is interesting to view the military strategies that countries take, and to see the outcomes of these schemes. 

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tourism in Belfast, Ireland

"Belfast has been coming into its own in the last few years, developing a vibrant restaurant scene, award-winning architecture and a new cosmopolitanism."

 

Tags: Ireland, culture, architecture, tourism, Europe.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 2015 1:56 PM

Have you ever wondered why Northern Ireland a part of the U.K.?  Read this article from the Economist

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

15 Countries In 4 Minutes (Time Lapse)

"During the past two years, Kien Lam went on the kind of trip most could only dream about. The photographer wanted to "see as much of the world as possible," so he visited 15 countries around the globe, from Mexico to New Zealand, snapping more than 10,000 photographs along the way. He edited his work together to make this stupendous time-lapse, which may be one of the most envy-inducing travel diaries I've ever seen."

 

Tags: landscape, time lapse, video.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 28, 2015 1:00 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:09 AM

Magnifique

Eden Eaves's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:56 PM

Unit 3

This time-lapse is one of the most amazing videos I've ever seen. Displaying the street-life in India, sand dunes in Arizona, the coast of Cozumel, coral reefs in Australia, mountains in Nepal, a castle in Scotland, Dubai's bright night lights, hobbit holes in the Shire and so many more amazing places captured in a few short seconds. It truly makes me feel like I traveled the world in 4.5 minutes.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2015 11:53 AM

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, February 7, 2015 11:56 PM

AMAZING!

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Strategic Importance of the Caspian Sea

"Stratfor Eurasia Analyst Eugene Chausovsky examines the Caspian Sea's large energy reserves and its conflicting maritime boundaries."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 12:44 PM

The Caspian Sea is an intriguing geopolitical situation. The region was once dominated by the Soviet Union but  after the collapse is shared by multiple countries. Further complicating matters is the sea is full of untapped oil deposits. Territory disputes in such a situation are almost inevitable raising tensions in the region. Azerbaijan also wants to make a deal with Turkmenistan and Europe to move gas through a pipeline to diversify their income and provide Europe and alternative to Russian fuel. Naturally the Russians with the help of Iranians are making this difficult because it would threaten their profits. It seems that  the whole area likely needs a neutral party to try and arrange fair economic usage zones in the area. The Ukrainian conflict has further exasperated this since Europe is sanctioning their key fuel provider which in turn leads to more tension over pipelines. Hopefully all the oil exploitation doesn't also lead to poor environmental consequences such as the Aral sea economic usage. It is clear that central Asia while free from communist rule is still very much tied to Russia and its past decisions.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 7, 8:51 AM
A key land battle that we will continue to see play out over the next decade and more. The Caspian Sea and the surrounding 5 countries are a vital source of oil and the debate over first off who's oil it is and how it will be shipped out will force many political polices and possibly military strategist. If these 5 countries are able to ship the oil to Europe with out using Russia it will be game changing for all of their economies which rely so much on Russia. Also this is why Russia continues to push this area and others around it to deal with them and to form their own union to combat the EU. This will be a key political battle that Russia must win if it wants to continue to grow as a world power again. Will the United States get involved is a bigger question as it can become an area in which could give them a key negotiating spot at the table. If they were to make a deal with these countries it could force Russia into making key deals with them as well 
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2:37 PM
This video discusses the Caspian Sea and it’s importance to the countries that surround it. The body of water is significant because of it energy resources that are underneath and surrounding it. However many of these reserves remain untouched because of conflict with the surrounding countries even though discussions about how to disperse the land have been discussed for 20+ years
Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | world geography | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from world geography
Scoop.it!

Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


Via Seth Dixon, jim mcdougle
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

Nicole Canova's curator insight, January 18, 7:10 PM
This video does a good job of explaining globalization and the effects it has on transportation, communication, economy, politics, and culture around the world.  It also discusses some of the consequences of the world becoming a smaller place.
Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:05 PM

unit 6

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:06 PM

unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What would happen if humans became extinct?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2014 4:37 PM

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:50 PM

It is funny because this video just made me think about TV shows such as The Walking Dead and Z-Nation.  Of course, not for the zombies, but what if some disease might wipe out the human race, and also how the earth will looks like after human extinction. The impact on earth when human life is gone will be catastrophic for domestic animals left behind. The wild animals will become dominant. Many species will also become extinct and a lot of chemicals will poison grounds and infrastructure will collapse with the force of the weather after few years. Although, it is fascinating how humans can preamble the fact that satellite can be worked forever after humans are gone from Earth. It is not only about humans, but also about the Earth that we need to come up with more reasons to be green on the planet. 

Rescooped by jim mcdougle from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

Blayze Padgett's curator insight, January 10, 2017 1:03 PM

The article/video relates to AP Human Geography because it involves Thomas Malthus's theory that population is going to surpass food production if we don't fix our priorities. In my opinion this article makes a very valid point that could be true. We don't exactly need to start more farms and spread agriculture, instead, we should pay attention to our priorities and make the right decisions with the food we harvest from agriculture.