Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor
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Paragraph #2: Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

Paragraph #2: Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
American Terror
Gunnar Jones's insight:

Pearl Harbor changed America forever. Our way of life was converted to a different thought process when it comes to other countries. We are more secure about certain things coming in and going out of America. At one point the Japanese Americans were interned because of the attack on America. The US believed that some of them were spies who were sending information to Japan to let them know what our plan was and where we were weakest. For almost half of the wars duration Japanese Americans were held in concentration camps. These camps were not punishing like the German camps, they were mainly for safety and security in America. After the surrender of Japan they became Americas ally and now a big trading source for many essential things. To this day our boarders are more secure and ready at all times in-case of an attack from the outside and even from the inside. The American economy was saved after the attack by Japan because more jobs as soldiers or military workers opened up giving citizens money to spend and help themselves out of debt and later made Japan a made source for all types of trade.

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Abigail Kay T's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:28 PM

Pearl Harbor changed America forever. Our way of life was converted to a different thought process when it comes to other countries. We are more secure about certain things coming in and going out of America. At one point the Japanese Americans were interned because of the attack on America. The US believed that some of them were spies who were sending information to Japan to let them know what our plan was and where we were weakest. For almost half of the wars duration Japanese Americans were held in concentration camps. These camps were not punishing like the German camps, they were mainly for safety and security in America. After the surrender of Japan they became Americas ally and now a big trading source for many essential things. To this day our boarders are more secure and ready at all times in-case of an attack from the outside and even from the inside. The American economy was saved after the attack by Japan because more jobs as soldiers or military workers opened up giving citizens money to spend and help themselves out of debt and later made Japan a made source for all types of trade.

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Website #3: The US Navy and Hawaii--A Historical Summary

Website #3: The US Navy and Hawaii--A Historical Summary | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
The US Navy and Hawaii: A Historical Summary. Extracted from Administrative History of the Fourteenth Naval District and the Hawaiian Sea Frontier. vol. 1 (Hawaii, 1945)
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Connection #2: Pearl Harbor memories fading with time

Connection #2: Pearl Harbor memories fading with time | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
You could hardly escape reminders of it during World War II. And over the course of decades since, Dec. 7 has meant one thing to generations of Americans: Pearl Harbor. Unprovoked attack.
Gunnar Jones's insight:

This article speaks about how the remembrance of dying off as just an event not an important part of American history. I kinda of agree with this statement because even the more recent 9/11 has become a memory and not a day to remember the lives that were taken in the attack on the twin towers. During World War 2 Pearl Harbor was the number one topic mentioned all over America. The big reason for it to have lost it's publicity is because the men and women who survived the attack are getting old and passing away due to age. There aren't many left to still talk about what happened and what was going through their heads for the duration of the attack. It's sad that American history is being forgotten that much.

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Primary Source #2

Primary Source #2 | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
Gunnar Jones's insight:

The line of battleships in the photo was called "Battleship row" and was taken out first thing at 8;00 on December 7, 1941. The Japanese torpedo planes were meant to take out the big carriers but not meant to bring the pilot back. Kamikaze pilots were the source of weaponry during for the Attack of Pearl Harbor. Kamikaze pilots flew their planes into the hulls of the battle ships causing them to burn up and sink. You can see in the back ground of this photo the smoke from the fire of a burning ship that was taken down by a Japanese torpedo plane. Oil from the battleships spread across the water turning it pitch black and making it difficult for any sailor in the water to swim too land. Also if you can see the Japanese writing in the lower right hand corner it indicates that the photo was reproduced in authorization of the Navy Ministry.

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Mackenzie Jordan M's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:29 PM

The line of battleships in the photo was called "Battleship row" and was taken out first thing at 8;00 on December 7, 1941. The Japanese torpedo planes were meant to take out the big carriers but not meant to bring the pilot back. Kamikaze pilots were the source of weaponry during for the Attack of Pearl Harbor. Kamikaze pilots flew their planes into the hulls of the battle ships causing them to burn up and sink. You can see in the back ground of this photo the smoke from the fire of a burning ship that was taken down by a Japanese torpedo plane. Oil from the battleships spread across the water turning it pitch black and making it difficult for any sailor in the water to swim too land. Also if you can see the Japanese writing in the lower right hand corner it indicates that the photo was reproduced in authorization of the Navy Ministry.

Abigail Kay T's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:29 PM

The line of battleships in the photo was called "Battleship row" and was taken out first thing at 8;00 on December 7, 1941. The Japanese torpedo planes were meant to take out the big carriers but not meant to bring the pilot back. Kamikaze pilots were the source of weaponry during for the Attack of Pearl Harbor. Kamikaze pilots flew their planes into the hulls of the battle ships causing them to burn up and sink. You can see in the back ground of this photo the smoke from the fire of a burning ship that was taken down by a Japanese torpedo plane. Oil from the battleships spread across the water turning it pitch black and making it difficult for any sailor in the water to swim too land. Also if you can see the Japanese writing in the lower right hand corner it indicates that the photo was reproduced in authorization of the Navy Ministry.

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Paragraph #1: Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

Paragraph #1: Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
American Terror
Gunnar Jones's insight:

Pearl Harbor was once known as simply another military base. Until December 7, 1941 when Japanese fighter planes attacked and bombed the military base of Pearl Harbor. Over 1,000 American military sailors were killed and nearly 2,000 were injured. Over 360 Japanese fighter planes were launched by Admiral Isoroku Yamamotoa, 180 of which were torpedo planes. Torpedo planes were flown by kamikaze pilots who were ready to give their lives for the cause of the war. These torpedo planes were flown into the hulls of the battleships that were based in the Harbor. As the planes hit an explosion would burst and cause huge flames and high amounts of smoke to fill the air. Oil and fuel was leaking out into the ocean turning it pitch black making it even scarier than it already was. The attack was unexpected by the US and ended up as the Japanese advantage. Our Navy-men were not ready to fight back, most of them were still sleeping when the attack began. Many soldiers died just by trying to get ready and go find a gun to fight the attacking planes. President Franklin Roosevelt stated that it was "a date which will live in infamy." He was correct in that thought for even to this day America still remembers what happened December 7, 1941.

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Abigail Kay T's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:28 PM

Pearl Harbor was once known as simply another military base. Until December 7, 1941 when Japanese fighter planes attacked and bombed the military base of Pearl Harbor. Over 1,000 American military sailors were killed and nearly 2,000 were injured. Over 360 Japanese fighter planes were launched by Admiral Isoroku Yamamotoa, 180 of which were torpedo planes. Torpedo planes were flown by kamikaze pilots who were ready to give their lives for the cause of the war. These torpedo planes were flown into the hulls of the battleships that were based in the Harbor. As the planes hit an explosion would burst and cause huge flames and high amounts of smoke to fill the air. Oil and fuel was leaking out into the ocean turning it pitch black making it even scarier than it already was. The attack was unexpected by the US and ended up as the Japanese advantage. Our Navy-men were not ready to fight back, most of them were still sleeping when the attack began. Many soldiers died just by trying to get ready and go find a gun to fight the attacking planes. President Franklin Roosevelt stated that it was "a date which will live in infamy." He was correct in that thought for even to this day America still remembers what happened December 7, 1941.

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Website #2: Pearl Harbor

Website #2: Pearl Harbor | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
On December 7, 1941, hundreds of Japanese fighter planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The next day, President Franklin Roosevelt declared war on Japan. It was the official beginning of American involvement in World War II.
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Connection #1: World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument - Arizona Memorial

Connection #1: World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument - Arizona Memorial | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
Gunnar Jones's insight:

Pearl Harbor affected life in the United States then and still has that same affect on it today. Our way of living was changed forever because this was the very first time the US was attacked on its own soil. To this day Pearl Harbor has memorials all over America but mainly in Honolulu Hawaii where the event took place. About 3,000 miles in the middle of  the Pacific Ocean and 4,000 miles out from Japan. 9 historic locations are set up all around 3 of the western areas of the United States, California, Alaska, and Hawaii. this site mentions the USS Arizona that fell to a kamikaze attack on December 7, 1941.

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PRIMARY SOURCE #1

PRIMARY SOURCE #1 | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
Gunnar Jones's insight:

This is a photo of one of 180 planes launched December 7, 1941. The attack was planned by Admiral Isoroku Yamamotoa with a plan to derail the US navy. Around 7:00 am the first wave of planes was spotted by a Army radar alert operator. The officers that received the reports did not find them as a threat and did not take action. Japanese aircrews were able to hit most of the American ships that were all in a line on the harbor. But the aircraft carriers were not the only things being bombed, the Japanese took the opportunity to bomb the American military airfields that were lined with trucks and planes owned by the United States military.

 

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Abigail Kay T's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:29 PM

This is a photo of one of 180 planes launched December 7, 1941. The attack was planned by Admiral Isoroku Yamamotoa with a plan to derail the US navy. Around 7:00 am the first wave of planes was spotted by a Army radar alert operator. The officers that received the reports did not find them as a threat and did not take action. Japanese aircrews were able to hit most of the American ships that were all in a line on the harbor. But the aircraft carriers were not the only things being bombed, the Japanese took the opportunity to bomb the American military airfields that were lined with trucks and planes owned by the United States military.

 

Mackenzie Jordan M's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:29 PM

This is a photo of one of 180 planes launched December 7, 1941. The attack was planned by Admiral Isoroku Yamamotoa with a plan to derail the US navy. Around 7:00 am the first wave of planes was spotted by a Army radar alert operator. The officers that received the reports did not find them as a threat and did not take action. Japanese aircrews were able to hit most of the American ships that were all in a line on the harbor. But the aircraft carriers were not the only things being bombed, the Japanese took the opportunity to bomb the American military airfields that were lined with trucks and planes owned by the United States military.

 

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Primary Source #3

Primary Source #3 | Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor | Scoop.it
Gunnar Jones's insight:

This photo is of the remains, after the bombing, of USS Arizona. It was hit by a torpedo plane but not fully sunk because of the shallowness of the water it once floated on. Almost all the other battle ships were on deeper water and sunk to the bottom after being attacked.  In 1941 FDR declared this attack to be a "date which will live in infamy" and it has. The attack has not been forgotten only has it become slightly less of a major deal. The attack lasted only two hours but has lasted in Americas memory too this day and probably will go beyond that.

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Mackenzie Jordan M's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:28 PM

This photo is of the remains, after the bombing, of USS Arizona. It was hit by a torpedo plane but not fully sunk because of the shallowness of the water it once floated on. Almost all the other battle ships were on deeper water and sunk to the bottom after being attacked.  In 1941 FDR declared this attack to be a "date which will live in infamy" and it has. The attack has not been forgotten only has it become slightly less of a major deal. The attack lasted only two hours but has lasted in Americas memory too this day and probably will go beyond that.

Abigail Kay T's curator insight, March 18, 2016 1:29 PM

This photo is of the remains, after the bombing, of USS Arizona. It was hit by a torpedo plane but not fully sunk because of the shallowness of the water it once floated on. Almost all the other battle ships were on deeper water and sunk to the bottom after being attacked.  In 1941 FDR declared this attack to be a "date which will live in infamy" and it has. The attack has not been forgotten only has it become slightly less of a major deal. The attack lasted only two hours but has lasted in Americas memory too this day and probably will go beyond that.