Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns
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Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA)

Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
RAWA is an independent political/social organization of Afghan women struggling for peace, freedom, democracy and women's rights in fundamentalism-blighted Afghanistan.
Nicole Schutte's insight:

The organization is currently a way that women are gaining more rights in Afghanistan. They are bringing awareness to women rights and are fighting against the people that are giving them less freedoms. RAWA helps bring attention to people and other countries to help them fight against the government to give them the rights they deserve.

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The Bush White House Was Deaf to 9/11 Warnings

The Bush White House Was Deaf to 9/11 Warnings | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
The Bush administration was told, as early as May 2001, about the threat of an attack by Al Qaeda.
Nicole Schutte's insight:

Al Qaeda, who was a major leader and terrorist involved with the Taliban, is the reason why the United States is at war with Afghanistan. Al Qaeda and Bin Laden were the instigators of 9/11, which caused the trauma of the twin towers. It represents the terror that the Taliban brought to the enitre country of Afghanistan when they were in power.

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Afghanistan

Afghanistan | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
map of the country
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Nicole Schutte's comment, December 14, 2012 12:04 PM
The book takes place in the country of Afghanistan, mainly in the country of Kabul. It is surrounded by Iran, Pakistan, and Russia, which explains the reasons of why Afghanistan is at war with these countries. It's between two countries that are both "war hungry" and is also very easy to get to.
Nicole Schutte's comment, December 18, 2012 11:50 AM
cities*
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'A' is for Allah, 'J' is for Jihad

Education related to War
Nicole Schutte's insight:

<http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/AcademicJournalsDetailsPage/AcademicJournalsDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Journals&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE|A86744640>;

 

This article deals with education and how it relates back to the wars in Afghanistan. The textbooks that were supposed to be edited are still used to this day and they are not the same kind of books that we have here. The books are all war based, whether it be a math problem to an english essay, they all are warlike situations. These books are meant to teach the young children loyalty to their country, and also put them in a war mindset at a young age so they will join the army. The books also state how women are important in the country, however they say that women are only valuable for the work they do in the household, and not out on the streets. The books were supposed to be edited and then released to schools in order to teach them the more current mindset the country "wants to be in" but the stores are making fresh prints of the old copies and still teaching that to the children. These books are ironic because of the women aspect, and also because the United States loaned money to Afghanistan in order for them to write these books, but now the books are being used against us in the current war with the Middle East. Some claim that Afghanistan wished to end the teaching of these books, but they aren't necassarily telling the truth since the Taliban encouraged the teaching of war like tactics to young children. The education lead to more detruction of the country than what was primarily projected.

 

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Fear Beneath The Burka

Fear Beneath The Burka | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
Women are given less rights then men, especially when it comes to what to wear.
Nicole Schutte's insight:

<http://find.galegroup.com/gic/retrieve.do?sgHitCountType=None&sort=Relevance&tabID=T006&prodId=GIC&resultListType=RESULT_LIST&searchId=R7&searchType=&currentPosition=9&qrySerId=Locale%28en%2C%2C%29%3AFQE%3D%28KE%2CNone%2C24%29afghanistan+women+rights%24&userGroupName=glen71651&inPS=true&docId=A84074504&contentSet=IAC-Documents&docId=A84074504&docType=IAC>.

 

The women of Afghanistan were not given many rights at all when it came to the country being ruled by the Taliban. The women were forced to stay inside and wear clothing that covered them head to toe. The females are scared from having to live their lives in such ways that they were not even allowed to show their faces in public. Although the Taliban are gone, many fear that if they take it off they will lose a sense of security and the only thing that makes them feel safe. They do not want to go out into public and get back to normal lives because they do not want to be attacked by the government if the Taliban were to gain back power once all outside troops leave the country. The clothing they were forced to wear and the security of the home now give the women a sense of safety that they've been wanting all along, even though it is okay for them to be out in public.

 

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A Thousand Splendid Suns: The Novel

A Thousand Splendid Suns: The Novel | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
The book that all the following sources are about.
Nicole Schutte's insight:

A Thousand Splendid Suns is a book that is based in Afghanistan during the Afghan War. It's told from the perspective of two different women throughout the story, an adult and a teenager as their lives progress. Mariam, the adult, tells her story of how she "ran away" from home and ended up at her fathers house in Herat. Her father ended up selling her off to a man that makes her live like a low class Afghan women and eventually ends up being abusive. Mariam shows the courage of the women in Afghanistan during these times. Laila, who is the teenager throughout the book, tells her story of her childhood. She is in a household that her brothers-who are in the war- are the favored children. This leaves Laila to feel as if she is noting, but she finds comfort with her Babi, which values her and her education. Laila is in love with a boy Tariq, and Tariq asks to marry her and go to Pakistan with him, but she decides to stay home and comfort her family. This was the wrong decision becuase a bomb ends up hitting the house they live in. Her parents die and then she is forced to live with her neighbors, which is Rasheed and Mariam. Rasheed then ends up taking Laila as his second wife which at first creates anger between the two women. However, the two become great friends and end up standing up for each other in the end when Rasheed is at his worst. Mariam kills Rasheed in order to protect Laila when he is beating her. As consequence, Mariam is sent to prison and is then later killed by the Taliban. Laila is then free to live with Tariq and her children. The family moves back to Kabul and ends up living a happy life.

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Rooftops of Tehran

Rooftops of Tehran | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
In a middle-class neighborhood of Iran’s sprawling capital city, 17-year-old Pasha Shahed spends the summer of 1973 on his rooftop with his best friend Ahmed, dreaming about the future and asking burning questions about life.
Nicole Schutte's insight:

If you liked A Thousand Splendid Suns you would also enjoy this book. It is related to the same culture as Afghanistan, and has the same views. The boy and girl are forbidden to love eachother just how Laila and Tariq are forbidden in the novel.

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A History of Women in Afghanistan: Then and Now

A History of Women in Afghanistan: Then and Now | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
TOLOnews.com, the most up-to-date information and news about Afghanistan.
Nicole Schutte's insight:

It is very well known that the women of Afghanistan have been discriminated in the past. Their rights have been majorly violated and it was very unfortunate to be a women living in Afghanistan. But today, women are starting to gain back their freedoms. They are allowed to participate in the same careers that men are able to, are able to leave the house openly without supervison of their husband, and even allowed to run for positions of authority. The total freedoms of women will hopefully be granted soon.

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Relations With Afghanistan

wars of afghanistan
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<http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE|CX3404100024>;

 

This article is about the many wars that Afghanistan have been involved in for a constant 50 years. There has always been conflict with its neighboring country Russia, which may be the reason for U.S. involvement in Aghanistan. At first, the two countries were neutral toward eachother and Russia had even helped them economically with lending them 2.5 billion dollars. However the Sawr Revolution did not help the relations between the two countries, but caused tthe two to go into war. Russia's reasoning for invading Afghanistan was similar the the U.S. invasion a few years ago- to help stabilize the government of the country and turn it more into a democracy. This caused many leaders of Afghanistan to die or be overthrown so there was a constant change of leadership of the country. The United Nations helped Afghanistan defeat the Russians and the troops left the country. However there was more of a conflict when the Taliban into power. The leader Babrak Karmal was overthrown in order for the Mujahedeen troops to take over which cause a civil war to break out in the country. The U.S. entered the country after we were under the attack of Al Qaeda and we are still in the country til this day, trying to resolve the conflict.

 

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Taliban

Taliban | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
information about this terrorist group
Nicole Schutte's insight:

<http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE|CX3045302689>;

 

The Taliban is a horrible group that had control of Afghanistan for nearly 6 years before it was controlled by the U.S. government. The terrorist group claimed to be taking over Afghanistan in order to restore the country and to enforce islamic law. However they did just the opposite. They took over many cities throughout the country, and left many refugees in the process, who were all obligated to join the Taliban army. They took the islamic culture to an extreme and were a very violent group to the country. They had specific laws for men and the country such as no television or radio. They were cut peoples hands of or stone them for even the simpleist crimes. However the biggest problem was the treatment of women while the Taliban were in power. Women had to stay inside their house and could only leave with the presence of a male figure. The Taliban had alliances with neighboring countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia which caused controversy around the world since Pakistan is accused of helping the Taliban gain so much power in Afghanistan. Al Qaeda was also a big part of the terrorist aspect of the Taliban, but was soon controlled by the U.S. after the attack of 9/11. The Taliban ended power in 2001 once defeated but the United States Army.

 

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The Women of Afghanistan

The Women of Afghanistan | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
Overall problems of women's rights in Afghanistan
Nicole Schutte's insight:

http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/NewsDetailsPage/NewsDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=News&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE|A299816074

 

 

In this article, there are facts about the Afghanistan laws that are related to women and women's rights. Women have started to gain a little bit more power but are still in danger of having their rights abused. There are more laws that relate to punishing people for abusing their wives, more restrictions on arranged marriage and rape, and more leniency on girls going to school. Education is a big part of many people's lives around the country but in Afghanistan, it is not the top priority for girls to attend school. When the Taliban was in power, women were forced to stay out of sight. After the Taliban was forced out by the U.S. after September 11, there has been more women allowed to attend school. However there is still a minimum amount of girls that actually attend school, and most actually do not stay in school for very long. There are things that people in the country do to force women to not go to school. There are issues with women torture, and also selling women into arranged marriages or prostitution. These issues are still trying to be dealt with today, and many people fear that once the U.S. leaves the country the problems will resume as they did before, and women will not be able to go to schools and get the education they deserve.

 

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Insight: Arranged Marriage

Insight: Arranged Marriage | Women's Rights Afghanistan: A Thousand Splendid Suns | Scoop.it
Nicole Schutte's insight:

This video is an interview type show that asks an Afghan man about arranged marriage. The man says that he is going to set up his sons arranged marriage because it is what he did and it seems to work out perfectly fine for him. He believes that he is a good enough judge of character to decide the person that his child will marry. The girl had been arranged to marry a man out of the blue. She had no build up to the marriage, and other priorities to take care of first, but was not able to pursue them. The girl had no choice to say yes or no since it was prohibited to choose in her family. Certain cultures believe that it is best for the parents to choose the person that their child is going to marry since they believe that the child doesn't know what they want or what is best for them in the future. They try and look for people that have similar values as opposed to just based off looks which some marriages are based off of. However not all arranged marriages work out. There are abusive relationships, and sometimes it just doesn't seem to work out. Arranged marriages can end up in a bad way, because the woman can feel as if they do not have a say in anything else in life and are not allowed to make their own choices. IT is a very controversial topic that differs from cultures and family views and experiences.

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