women's issues history
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Rescooped by Chase Van Sant from Women's Issues History
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Before the Women's Suffrage Movement

Before the Women's Suffrage Movement | women's issues history | Scoop.it
The women's suffrage movement lasted at least 70 years, from the first formal women's convention in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York to the passage of the 19th amendment. 

Via Allie Moore
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I like this article because it shows how hard women fought for freedom to vote. When the 19th ammendment passed women could vote. It shows how hard the women fought for what they believed in. It relates to the U.S. because it happend in the U.S. All women can vote as long as they are citizens of the U.S.

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Brad Bortscheller's comment, September 27, 2013 12:09 PM
This article is wonderful in outlining the importance of women to our society. They definitely deserve the right to vote. Women are strong and deserve the same rights as men because of their importance in repopulation and all they do for everyone.
Aletta Verhey's comment, October 2, 2013 12:59 PM
I like how you mentioned the 19th amendment because that was a huge thing for women in history (and today). Women have just as much of a right as men do to vote. It was a big thing in history because it has affected people (especially women) today.
Tori Swanson's comment, October 3, 2013 9:14 AM
I really like this article because you can really see how hard life was for women back then and how hard they fought for what they believed in. You did a great job finding this article.
Rescooped by Chase Van Sant from Womens Rights
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The Fight for Women's Suffrage

The Fight for Women's Suffrage | women's issues history | Scoop.it
Check out the history behind women's suffrage and the events that led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Find out how women got the right to vote.

Via Keslie Carr
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I like this article because it talks more about the voting time to make women equal. It breaks it down into sections. I thought it was interestion that it started more in the west and midwest. Instead of just talking about the 19th ammendment it talks about how it ties into the other ammendments as well. 

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Rescooped by Chase Van Sant from 100 year project examples
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Womens Rights Movement timeline | Timetoast timelines text view

Womens Rights Movement timeline | Timetoast timelines  text view | women's issues history | Scoop.it
The Womens Rights Movement timeline. View the 'Womens Rights Movement' timeline, create your own timeline or just browse the timeline collection.

Via phslib
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I like this timeline a lot becuase it goes all the way back to 1850 and gives details about it. Most maps wouldn't do that. I think it is interesting to see the movement and organizations that formed and when all the states made women more equal. I thought it was interesting to see Wyoming was the first to pass the sufferage law. I thought it would have been something in the East coast because thats where most things started.

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Rescooped by Chase Van Sant from IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN
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Native Women Campaigning for Human Rights in North America · Causes - #Trafficking #VAWA #IdleNoMore

Native Women Campaigning for Human Rights in North America · Causes - #Trafficking #VAWA #IdleNoMore | women's issues history | Scoop.it

About

Campaigning for Justice; Culture, Traditions, Language, and Legal Hereditary Rights for our Children

 

1) Native women experience Triple Jeopardy Discrimination from the time they are born: being a woman, a woman of color, and living within a lower income.

 

2) Native women experience racialized sexual violence from media images, news print, education - history, employment, from a partner or spouse, strangers, and within the layers of the Justice System, directly caused from the history of colonization and oppressive domination through the Indian Act. We want dignity, respect, and a voice!

 

3) Native women in North America are five times more likely than other women of the same age to die as the result of violence according to statistics North America

 

1. Native Women Need Housing, To live with Warmth, Safety, and Security

2. Native Women Require Proper Health Care, Education, Employment, and Training.

3. Native Women Want a Political Voice in North America; because they are denied basic human rights within the layers of the justice system and society.

 


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I think that this article is interesting because Indians were the first to step foot on U.S. soil. They helped start the U.S. and the still aren't being treated fairly. They should be treated fairly because they are women just like everyone else. 

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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, September 18, 2013 11:53 AM

HAVE A VOICE ... DO SOMETHING .. #Trafficking #VAWA #IdleNoMore

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The Women's Liberation Movement of the 1960s

The Women's Liberation Movement of the 1960s | women's issues history | Scoop.it
The Women�s Liberation Movement of the 1960s is a paper written by Wisconsin high school student Vintee Sawhney.

Via Allie Moore
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I think that this article is interesting becuase it talks about how women were trapped in their houses. They can do more outside of the house. They can get jobs and not be discriminated. It was a major self esteem booster for women everywhere in the U.S. They could go out and do big jobs that the men would do. It was a big outbreak for the women who wanted to do mens work.

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Allie Moore's curator insight, September 25, 2013 7:15 PM

The Women's Liberation Movement of the 1960s was a very important event. I liked this article because it explains how women were trapped in their houses always doing the housekeeping but the Liberation Movement changed that and women could get jobs and there wasn't any more discrimination with jobs between women and men. I also liked how women realized that media and looks wasn't all that mattered, women started realizing that they were more and they meant more than what they looked like and starting feeling better about themseleves, not being so insecure and started feeling important in this world. This relates to the U.S today because there is many groups women have created dealing with their church, book clubs, family issues. 

Rescooped by Chase Van Sant from Womens Rights
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Women in the Progressive Era

Women in the Progressive Era | women's issues history | Scoop.it

Via Keslie Carr
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I found this article interesting becuase it gave very detailed history. I didn't know that the sufferage era started in 1849 almost all the way to 1920. It summed up everything very easily and made it easy to read. I think its interesting to see the differences between women then and women now. 

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Rescooped by Chase Van Sant from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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Women's Rights Infographic

Infographic about global statistics on women's rights. Music: Ketto Revisited feat. Bonobo - Kidkanevil For more info visit onebillionrising.org

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I think that this is very intresting. It relates to the U.S. and Canada because only 27% of judges are women. The other parts don't relate as much but some of the history does. It is very intresting that women still aren't being treated right in some places even though they are "equal".

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International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped

International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped | women's issues history | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped
Chase Van Sant's insight:

I think that this map is very interesting. I didn't know that New Zeland was the first to have women equal. I think it is interesting to see that there are still very few places that don't have equal rights for women. 

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