Women of the Civil Rights Movement
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Women of the Civil Rights Movement
This page provides links to information about women who were influential in the Civil Rights Movement.
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Before Rosa Parks, There Was Claudette Colvin

Before Rosa Parks, There Was Claudette Colvin | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
Colvin was one of a number of women who refused to give up their seats in protest of Jim Crow laws.
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Claudette Colvin was arrested for not giving up her seat on the bus before Rosa Parks, but she is much less well known.  Read her story!

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Honoring the Women of the Civil Rights Movement

Honoring the Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
History month celebrations, like those honoring African-Americans and women, are sometimes criticized as being ineffective ways of countering the tendency to marginalize the vital role of blacks and women in shaping American culture.
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The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is an excellent source of information when research violations of civil rights.  This cite summarizes the lives of multiple women of the Civil Rights Movement and why they should be remembered.  It also gives links to other credible websites about those women.  Any of these women can be foci of your research project.

 

"Until we are better at recognizing fully the history of excluded groups in a more comprehensive way, though, history months do provide at least some opportunity to fill in some important gaps in the way our national story is told. In the case of telling the civil rights story, having Women's History Month immediately following Black History Month creates a special opportunity to fill in gaps by permitting an extended discussion of civil rights through highlighting the unique and vital role that women played in American history in general and in the civil rights struggle in particular."

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Obama OKs Honor For '63 Birmingham Bombing Victims

Obama OKs Honor For '63 Birmingham Bombing Victims | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
May 24 (Reuters) - President Barack Obama signed a bill into law on Friday granting the United States' highest civilian honor to four black girls killed in a civil rights-era church bombing that shocked the nation in 1963.
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History is still alive!  President Barack Obama awarded the four girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing the Congressional Gold Medal.  Read about the impact that the lost lives of these girls had on the Civil Rights Movement.

 

"May 24 (Reuters) - President Barack Obama signed a bill into law on Friday granting the United States' highest civilian honor to four black girls killed in a civil rights-era church bombing that shocked the nation in 1963.

Congress awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to 14-year-olds Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, and 11-year-old Denise McNair, who were killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama."

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Who Was Ella Baker?

Who Was Ella Baker? | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
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Ella Baker, an advocate of nonviolent protest during the Civil Rights Movement, is frequently overlooked despite her positive impact.  This website gives an overview of her life and influence during the Civil Rights Movement, including meaningful quotations she spoke during her lifetime.

"The Ella Baker Center for Human Rights is named after a largely unsung hero of the civil rights Freedom Movement who inspired and guided emerging leaders."

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Coretta Scott King Biography -- Academy of Achievement

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This is an excellent biography of Coretta Scott King, the "first lady of civil rights."

"As an undergraduate, she took an active interest in the nascent Civil Rights Movemement; she joined the Antioch chapter of the NAACP, and the college's Race Relations and Civil Liberties Committees."

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Women had key roles in civil rights movement

Women had key roles in civil rights movement | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
Many women risked their lives and worked tirelessly, demanding a social revolution — but history has often overlooked them.
Kristen Pham's insight:

This is an excellent website that focuses on less well known women.  Students often have trouble finding information about Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Vivan Malone Jones, and Fannie Lou Hamer, but this site includes them and explains why we should remember them!

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Fannie Lou Hamer

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Fannie Lou Hamer was part of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  She was jailed for her nonviolent protesting and even received death threats, but that didn't stop her from doing what she knew was write.  Read about her actions and speeches at this website.

"Fannie Lou Hamer, known as the lady who was "sick and tired of being sick and tired," was born October 6, 1917, in Montgomery County, Mississippi. She was the granddaughter of slaves. Her family were sharecroppers - a position not that different from slavery. Hamer had 19 brothers and sisters. She was the youngest of the children."

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Vivian Malone Jones Dies; Integrated U-Ala.

Vivian Malone Jones Dies; Integrated U-Ala. | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
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Vivian Malone Jones enrolled in the University of Alabama, despite the governor's attempts to stop her.  She became one of the first African American women to graduate from the University.  Read about her heroic tale from the Washington Post article on this website.

"Vivian Malone Jones, 63, one of two African American students who sought to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963 only to find her way blocked by Gov. George C. Wallace, died of a stroke Oct. 13 at the Atlanta Medical Center."

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Rosa Parks Bus - The Story Behind the Bus

Rosa Parks Bus - The Story Behind the Bus | Women of the Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
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This website gives details about Rosa Park's famous refusal to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, making her one of the most frequently noted female heroines of the Civil Rights Movement.

"On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks, a 42-year-old African American woman who worked as a seamstress, boarded this Montgomery City bus to go home from work. On this bus on that day, Rosa Parks initiated a new era in the American quest for freedom and equality."

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