Aspect 2: Women in the Field of Electrical Engineering
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

Educating Engineers for 2020 and Beyond - Engineering Challenges

Katy Scanio's insight:

Aspect 3: The Future of Engineering

more...
Katy Scanio's comment, April 4, 2014 12:35 PM
Supposed to be in quotes^ "......"
Katy Scanio's comment, April 4, 2014 12:36 PM
Some things that have not changed in the field of engineering over the past 35 years include: how to make the freshman year more exciting; how to communicate what engineers actually do; how to improve the writing and communication skills of engineering graduates; how to bring the richness of American diversity into the engineering workforce; how to give students a basic understanding of business processes; and how to get students to think about professional ethics and social responsibility.
Katy Scanio's comment, April 4, 2014 12:37 PM
But for the most part, things have changed, and will continue to change in astounding ways.
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

11th annual Women in Engineering day

11th annual Women in Engineering day | Aspect 2: Women in the Field of Electrical Engineering | Scoop.it
Nearly 100 students from across Central New York spent Friday morning at Lockheed Martin discovering the field of engineering.
more...
Katy Scanio's comment, March 13, 2014 10:14 PM
Women in Engineering Day has been attracting women from across New York to discover and learn about the field of engineering for the past 11 years. The concept of this particular day is to encourage women to pursue a career in engineering. Students are able to experience the ins and outs of engineering through meeting with several successful female engineers as well completing hand-ons activities.
Katy Scanio's comment, March 13, 2014 10:15 PM
"The girls get a full spectrum into what engineering has to offer not only at Lockheed but a lot of the engineers here talk about experiences from other companies that might peak some girls interests,” said Elizabeth Paoletti, Lockheed Martin Electrical Engineer.
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

Attracting Women to Engineering - ASME

Attracting Women to Engineering - ASME | Aspect 2: Women in the Field of Electrical Engineering | Scoop.it
As the mechanical engineering field works hard to fill an increasing shortage in the workplace with women, mechanical engineering in the medical and energy fields are appealing, as surveys have shown that women tend to want careers that help people and the world around them. Recent data has shown that efforts are succeeding, with the number of women receiving graduate engineering degrees increasing by about 2,300 from 2000–2008, rising to 22.5% from 20.5%.
more...
Katy Scanio's comment, March 12, 2014 9:30 PM
When it comes to engineering schools, or even just schools in general, there is a large effort exerted to pull a diversity of people. As for engineering, the industry knows that its pull needs to be stronger when it comes to women. When you have the power of gender diversity on a team of engineers, it brings much more creativity and innovation to the team. The effort to attract women to the field of engineering has increased generously within the past decade and according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, these efforts will only grow stronger in the following years.
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

EngineerGirl

EngineerGirl | Aspect 2: Women in the Field of Electrical Engineering | Scoop.it
The EngineerGirl website is designed to bring national attention to the exciting opportunities that engineering represents for girls and women.
more...
Katy Scanio's comment, March 5, 2014 12:45 PM
Hedy Lamarr, a glamorous Hollywood movie star who rose to fame in the 1930's, doubled as an engineer when she was not starring in movies. Hedy created a patent on technology, an idea that involved frequency hopping, which would become the base of today's advanced wireless networks. The technology Lamarr created was intended to be used in World War II, but was never actually utilized in during War time. On the other hand, this technology laid the foundation for modern day wireless communications, and has also been used in the containment of many U.S. intercontinental missiles.
Katy Scanio's comment, March 6, 2014 6:04 PM
Hedy worked with composer George Antheil and together they patented what was referred to as the "Secret Communication System." The idea of this creation was originally meant to block signals from radio-controlled missiles during World War II. This involved changing radio frequencies in order to prevent enemies from being able to detect the messages being administered. Although at the time this idea was not feasible, after several changes were made Hedy's invention became a very important contribution to both the military and the cell phone industry.
Katy Scanio's comment, March 11, 2014 8:52 AM
^used to engineer network connections such as bluetooth and Wifi.
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

The Future Engineer | Raise The Bar

The Future Engineer | Raise The Bar | Aspect 2: Women in the Field of Electrical Engineering | Scoop.it
Katy Scanio's insight:

Aspect 3: The Future of Engineering

more...
Katy Scanio's comment, April 3, 2014 6:47 PM
^..with fewer professional engineers working on projects.
Katy Scanio's comment, April 3, 2014 6:56 PM
With the ever changing and improving world of technology, jobs for electrical engineers are decreasing as technology takes over; eventually, routine engineering tasks for future projects will not require professional engineers. Such work will able to be performed perfectly well but unlicensed individuals who are simply taught how to maneuver technology advancements designed to accomplish those very "routine" tasks.
Katy Scanio's comment, April 4, 2014 7:48 AM
There are a multitude of difficult problems that future engineers will need to learn efficient ways to solve. As reported from over 40 countries, some of the major problems that will need solutions in the future of engineering are; providing access to clean water, reverse-engineering the brain, enhancing virtual reality, and securing cyberspace. (Among 10 other listed as the most prominent engineering issues that will eventually arise).
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

What women love about their engineering jobs : TARGETjobs

What women love about their engineering jobs : TARGETjobs | Aspect 2: Women in the Field of Electrical Engineering | Scoop.it
more...
Katy Scanio's comment, March 12, 2014 10:01 PM
When asked what it is like to be in the minority in the workforce of engineers, women responded with:
Katy Scanio's comment, March 12, 2014 10:03 PM
^ ''I have more male colleagues than women but it is certainly not a completely male-dominated environment. I have never had any issues with men taking me less seriously because of my sex. As long as you present yourself professionally there can be advantages: people are more likely to remember you for being a minority and often respect that it is harder for women to reach a management level so realize that you must be good at what you do.
Katy Scanio's comment, March 13, 2014 9:36 PM
Nowadays engineering companies are enforcing female support networks, such as; networking groups and mentoring initiatives. If such support systems are not in place, there are numerous external networks that make it their goal to put you in touch with female engineers from other organizations in an effort to increase the number of women in the field of engineering.
Scooped by Katy Scanio
Scoop.it!

Women in Electrical Engineering: One Mentor can Have a Big Impact | Stanford Knowledgebase

STANFORD UNIVERSITY — Female students make up 20 percent of engineering undergraduates, but 55 percent of all undergraduates. According to the National
more...
Katy Scanio's comment, March 11, 2014 8:43 AM
Although the numbers are small, they are increasing and women entering the field of engineering is becoming a lot more prevalent. Females make up 55 percent of all undergraduates, but 20 percent of engineering undergraduates. Women occupy 11 percent of jobs in the field of engineering, but compromise 46 percent of the total workforce according to the National Science Foundation. Robert Gray, who is an advocate for women engineers has been fighting those small statistics; he has mentored more than 50 PhD candidates-15 of them women who have gone on to successfully pursue engineering careers.
Katy Scanio's comment, March 11, 2014 8:46 AM
“The number isn’t that high, but even a small impact is a big percentage,” says Gray. “Word got around. After there was one happy, successful woman in the group, it was a magnet to others. You can feel as though you are representing your whole gender because there are currently very few women."