Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)
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Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)
Women are underepresented in STEM fields. Explore that disparity and celebrate the rich contributions that women have made.
Curated by Lisa Shaner
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The Truth About Gender and Math » Sociological Images

The Truth About Gender and Math » Sociological Images | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
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Tests show that average math ability is about the same between boys and girls, but there are more boys who do both better and worse than average. And girls do better in math classes in many countries.  Cultural bias is tied to worse performance. 

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'Geek' perception of computer science putting off girls, expert warns

'Geek' perception of computer science putting off girls, expert warns | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
Dumbing down of computing to IT literacy and lack of initiatives to inspire girls to take up the subject worsening the shortage
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"Girls have been further put off by dumbing down computing to IT literacy ... They think that if they study computing they are going to become secretaries."

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Perfect Gender Parity in STEM is Unrealistic As Long As There's A ...

Perfect Gender Parity in STEM is Unrealistic As Long As There's A ... | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
Government or non-profit studies on gender disparities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields always lament the stubborn, significant and persistent underrepresentation of females, who held only 24% of STEM jobs in 2009.
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Girls Lead in Science Exam, but Not in the United States

Girls Lead in Science Exam, but Not in the United States | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
Girls outperformed boys in more countries in a science test given to 15-year-old students in 65 countries — but in the United States, the scores reverse.
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This article suggests that gender gaps in science performance are based on culture. 

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Women in STEM Careers and the Gender Gap [Infographic]

Women in STEM Careers and the Gender Gap [Infographic] | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
According to research from the White House Council on Women and Girls, just 25% of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce are women. If that's not bad enough, those women are also paid ...
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100 Women Leaders in STEM | STEM Connector

100 Women Leaders in STEM | STEM Connector | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
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You can Download this magazine which lists 100 women leading in STEM fields.  

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Path to Innovation: Women, Mentors and STEM ... - Huffington Post

Path to Innovation: Women, Mentors and STEM ... - Huffington Post | Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) | Scoop.it
When I was named as one of the 100 Women Leaders in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) in 2012, I was thrilled by the honor of being named to the list, but troubled by the need for the list itself.
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Ada Yonath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ada E. Yonath (Hebrew: עדה יונת‎, pronounced [ˈada joˈnat]) (born 22 June 1939[1]) is an Israeli crystallographer best known for her pioneering work on the structure of the ribosome. She is the current director of the Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Center for Biomolecular Structure and Assembly of the Weizmann Institute of Science. In 2009, she received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan and Thomas A. Steitz for her studies on the structure and function of the ribosome, becoming the first Israeli woman to win the Nobel Prize out of ten Israeli Nobel laureates,[2] the first woman from the Middle East to win a Nobel prize in the sciences,[citation needed] and the first woman in 45 years to win the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. However, she said herself that there was nothing special about a woman winning the Prize.[3]

Yonath (née Lifshitz)[4] was born in the Geula quarter of Jerusalem.[5] Her parents, Hillel and Esther Lifshitz, were Zionist Jews who immigrated to Palestine from Łódź (Poland) in 1933 before the establishment of Israel.[6] Her father was a rabbi and came from a rabbinical family. They settled in Jerusalem and ran a grocery, but found it difficult to make ends meet. They lived in cramped quarters with several other families, and Yonath remembers "books" being the only thing she had to keep her occupied.[7] Despite their poverty, her parents sent her to school in the upscale Beit HaKerem neighborhood to assure her a good education. When her father died at the age of 42, the family moved to Tel Aviv.[8] Yonath was accepted to Tichon Hadash high school although her mother could not pay the tuition. She gave math lessons to students in return.[9] As a youngster, she says she was inspired by the Polish-French scientist Marie Curie.[10] However, she stresses that Curie, whom she as a child was fascinated by after reading a well-written biography, was not her "role model".[11] She returned to Jerusalem for college, graduating from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem with a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1962, and a master's degree in biochemistry in 1964. In 1968, she earned a Ph.D. in X-Ray crystallography at the Weizmann Institute of Science.

She has one daughter, Hagit Yonath, a doctor at Sheba Medical Center, and a granddaughter, Noa.[12] She is the cousin of anti-occupation activist Dr Ruchama Marton.[13]

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