Women and Heart Disease 4
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Women and Heart Disease 4
Say What? Doctor-Patient Communication
Curated by Carolyn Thomas
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Stupid things that doctors say to heart patients

Stupid things that doctors say to heart patients | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

From "You are a complainer - it CAN'T be your heart!" to "Go see a therapist - you just have Housewife Syndrome!", these real-life comments delivered by physicians to heart patients would be hilarious if they hadn't been made shortly before these patients subsequently had to undergo life-saving cardiac procedures.

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Say what? Do patients really hear what doctors tell them?

Say what? Do patients really hear what doctors tell them? | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

80% of patients sign medical consent forms they have not read, and appear to be unaware of both risks and benefits of the medical procedures they agree to.

 

Here's why there's a "yawning disconnect" between what doctors say and what patients hear.

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Doctors and social media — increasing the good we do?

Doctors and social media — increasing the good we do? | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

Dr. John Mandrola: “Here’s a fact about doctors: Most of us measure our self-worth by the amount of good we do.  Which does more good?  Burning (ablating) a complicated rogue pathway that formed in maze of heart scar tissue, or preventing the behaviors that led to the scar tissue?"

 

PS: Dr. John mentions here my article published recently in Prepared Patient Forum called: "Why Patients Listen to Me - But Not Their Doctors". 

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An open letter to all hospital staff

An open letter to all hospital staff | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

I present here "Carolyn's Top Ten Tips on How to Treat Your Patients" - and I suspect that if you substitute Cardiology-Speak for Emergency, Gynecology, Oncology, Radiology, Renal, Day Surgery or the hospital department where you work, these tips might be universally useful. Here's just one example:

 

1. Acknowledge the existence of arriving patients by saying something like: “Hello. How are you? My name is ____ and I’ll be doing your ___ procedure today.”

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Afraid to speak up at the doctor's office?

Afraid to speak up at the doctor's office? | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

New York Times: Patients felt limited to certain ways of speaking with their doctors, and many believed they were best served by acting as "supplicants" toward the doctor "who knows best," according to a new study.

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Interested in more on women's heart disease?

Interested in more on women's heart disease? | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

Please visit HEART SISTERS - written from the unique perspective of Carolyn Thomas, a Mayo Clinic-trained heart attack survivor and women's health advocate.  Find out what 446,000 visitors from 133 countries already know!

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Why don’t patients listen to doctors’ heart-healthy advice?

Why don’t patients listen to doctors’ heart-healthy advice? | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

Dr. Franz Wiesbauer, writing to his fellow doctors in an article called "Why Your Health Message Does Not Work", says that health is not just the absence of disease, yet that's how a lot of medical advice comes across. "Do this so you won't have a heart attack!" - instead of "Do this so you'll sleep better and feel better!" He explains the difference between our APPROACH goals vs our AVOIDANCE goals. 

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Six rules for navigating your next doctor’s appointment

Six rules for navigating your next doctor’s appointment | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

A 2008 Canadian study of women over 40 reported that women spend more time thinking about their weight than they do about their hearts. For example, only 10% of women surveyed knew their personal cholesterol numbers, versus the 64% of women who know how much they weighed in high school!

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Why aren’t more doctors like Dr. Bernard Lown?

Why aren’t more doctors like Dr. Bernard Lown? | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

His long-ago first experience with medical overtreatment involved keeping hospital patients recovering from acute heart attacks on strict bed rest for 4 to 6 weeks. It was what he now calls "a form of "medieval torture". 

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Bridging the doctor-patient gap

Bridging the doctor-patient gap | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it

With health care becoming increasingly high-tech, fast-paced and cost-conscious, a lot of doctors and patients alike are feeling out of sorts.  Doctors complain about being rushed and overwhelmed. Patients say they're not being heard, or their care is being short-changed.  Dr. Rita Charon, executive director of the Columbia University Medical Center's narrative medicine program in New York City, explains:

 

"The problem is doctors are not particularly selected for the profession because we are skilled in making contact with suffering people. But that doesn't mean that doctors are mean or malicious; they've just never been given the skills to receive the stories that people tell them."

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The lost art of common courtesy in medicine

The lost art of common courtesy in medicine | Women and Heart Disease 4 | Scoop.it
Since my heart attack, I have decided to stop meekly tolerating bad manners from my health care providers.

 

As Dr. Michael Kahn wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine:

 

"There have been many attempts to foster empathy, curiosity, and compassion in clinicians, but none that I know of to systematically teach good manners.

 

"The very notion of good manners may seem quaint or anachronistic, but it is at the heart of the mission of other service-related professions.

 

"The goals of a doctor differ in obviously important ways from those of a Nordstrom’s employee, but why shouldn’t the clinical encounter similarly emphasize the provision of customer satisfaction through explicit actions?"

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