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The Le Marche region has a lot to offer to wine lovers. There are 5 DOCG wines and 16 DOC wines. From the prestigious and famous Verdicchio, to the Vernaccia di Serrapetrona, from the Offida Pecorino to the Offida Passerina. Also: Bianchello del Metauro, Colli Maceratesi, Colli Pesaresi, Esino, Falerio dei Colli Ascolani, I Terreni di Sanseverino, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba, Rosso Conero, Pergola, Rosso Piceno, San Ginesio Many of these wines are little known outside of Italy but visitors to the region have a pleasant surprise when they try the local wine produced by many small aziendas and cantinas.
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The best Christmas wines - independent.co.uk

The best Christmas wines - independent.co.uk | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Piccini Memoro Bianco

Following last year's Memoro red and adopting a similar mode, Piccini has drawn together Viognier grapes from Sicily, Chardonnay from Trentino, Vermentino from Maremma and Pecorino from the Marche, to create something very different, each grape adding its own qualities and complementing each other. The result is surprisingly full-bodied, creamy, smoky and spicy and needs pairing with rich fish dishes or roast poultry. £9.49, Tesco


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Fun Thanksgiving Verdicchio Wine Pick

Fun Thanksgiving Verdicchio Wine Pick | Wines and People | Scoop.it

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, Sher Bliss has prepared the perfect selection of seasonal wines for an enjoyable and relaxing holiday season. Happy holidays!

  • Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico 2011 - A simple light, dry Italian white wine grown in the oldest winegrowing areas around Jesi. Palate is smooth with hints of apple, pear, and citrus fruits.
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Organic Wines Le Marche: Geos Rosso Piceno Moncaro

Organic Wines Le Marche: Geos Rosso Piceno  Moncaro | Wines and People | Scoop.it
  • Vineyards - Growing area: the Marche, in the province of Ascoli Piceno.
  • Location: the vineyards are sited nearby Acquaviva Picena town and are cultivated by using the biological techniques.
  • Age: varies from 8 to 30 years.
  • Soils: derived from alluvially-deposited seabed sediment, predominantly Plio-Pleistocene and Miocene, with predominance of sand and rock sloping down to the coast.
  • Aspect and elevation: on sunny hills at 200-350 m.
  • Grapes: 60% Montepulciano, 40% Sangiovese.
  • Training system: guyot and double guyot.
  • Vineyard density: 2.500-4.000 vines per hectare.
  • Yield: 100 q of grapes.
  • Harvest: hand-picked.
  • Vinification: fermentation at controlled temperature, maceration on the skins in steel tanks with daily pumpovers.
  • Maturation: partly in French oak barrels for 4 months
  • Appearance: ruby red colour tending to garnet at the rim.
  • Bouquet: soft fruit, well-ripened cherry melding impressively into subtler impressions of violet. Long and intense.
  • Palate: dry and sapid, its supple tannins and the alcoholic warmth create an admirable balance.
  • Cellaring - Its obvious youthful qualities best suit it to be enjoyed during its first year, but it give considerable pleasure even after 3-4 years.
  • Serving suggestions - Tomato sauce and ragout pasta, very good with bolognese lasagne and macaroni timbale. Perfect with porchetta (roast whole pig), shank of pork and veal stew.
  • Serving temperature - 16/18° C.
  • Alcohol: 12,5% vol.

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2010 Stefano Mancinelli Lacrima di Morro d'Alba Wine Review

Etty Lewensztain of Plonk Wine Merchants reviews the 2010 Stefano Mancinelli Lacrima di Morro d'Alba, an outstanding red from Le Marche in Italy that shows bold aromas of roses and violets.

http://www.plonkwinemerchants.com/

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Saladini Pilastri “Vigna Monteprandone," Rosso Piceno Superiore, Marches, Italy.

Saladini Pilastri “Vigna Monteprandone," Rosso Piceno Superiore, Marches, Italy. | Wines and People | Scoop.it
  • Grapes - 70% Montepulciano, 30% Sangiovese.
  • Facts - The Saladini Pilastri winery takes its name from Count Saladini Pilastri, a “nobleman” from the year 1000. When you’re thinking Rosso Piceno (which I’m sure this is the first time you’ve even seen that name), think Chianti. The two wines are very similar, since Rosso Piceno [Row-soe Pee-CHAY-noe] usually contains a majority of Sangiovese (the main grape used in Chianti) and the regions aren’t that far apart. If you ever see “Superiore” on a bottle of Italian vino it does actually have a definition…unlike all the garbage which is normally thrown onto the front label of New World wines (i.e. Reserve, Old Vines, Private Reserve etc.) The only problem is that each Italian region has its own definition on the term. In the case of Rosso Piceno, the term “Superiore” means that Montepulciano must make up between 35% and 70% of the blend, and Sangiovese between 30% and 50%. The region where the wines can be produced are also limited to 13 “municipalities.”
  • Place Directly to the East of Tuscany, on the side of the Adriatic sea, lies the Marches region. Even though Marches is located so close to Tuscany, the region is surprisingly behind the times when it comes to “quality” wine production. There are very few producers in Marches who have managed to export their product and see commercial success outside of Italy.
  • Taste - Chianti-esque on the nose and in a blind-tasting that’s probably what I would have guessed it was. Lots of red cherry, plum, toasted oak and dried herbs. Medium in body (which is no surprise, since Sangiovese and Montepulciano nearly always make medium-bodied wines), with vanilla, anise and some barnyardy aromas. One I’d buy again, and particularly important if you’re to venture out of your comfort zone. But hey, if you don’t like it, you can always rub down your horse with it! [If you skipped through this review straight to the tasting note, that last comment is going to absolutely make no sense at all…]
  • Price $16
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Incrocio Bruni 54 Fontezoppa - Marche, Italy

Incrocio Bruni 54 Fontezoppa - Marche, Italy | Wines and People | Scoop.it

The only wine I could find that contained today's grape, Incrocio Bruni 54, only had about 25% of it in the blend, while the other 75% was made from Pecorino. As of the 2004 Italian agricultural census, there were only 13 hectares (about 32 acres) of Incrocio Bruni 54 under vine in Italy, which essentially means there are only 13 hectares being grown in the world. It is cultivated basically only in the Marche and is allowed in the DOC wines of Colli Maceratesi, but can make up no more than 30% of the blend there....
Incrocio is an Italian word that means "crossing," and there are a handful of Incrocio grapes that are planted to varying degrees in Italy. These are grapes that were created either by private Italian breeders or by people working at various research institutes throughout Italy.
Bruni was working in the early part of the 20th Century in the Marche region of Italy and many of his crossings were created between 1930 and 1950....

The wine that I was able to try with Incrocio Bruni 54 in it was the 2010 Fontezoppa Marche Bianco, is about 25% Incrocio Bruni 54 and 75% Pecorino. I picked this bottle up locally for around $12. In the glass the wine was a pale silvery lemon color with greenish tints.

The nose was fairly intense with white pear, lemon, lime, green apple and pineapple aromas.
On the palate the wine was medium bodied with medium acidity. There were flavors of white pear, ripe red apples, lemony citrus, orange pith and green melon along with a kind of chalky minerality on the back end. This wine is certainly not a fair representation of what Incrocio Bruni 54 might taste like, but it does give a sense of how the grape is used when it is used at all.

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Italian wines: what happens when heritage grapes get cutting edge winemaking

Italian wines: what happens when heritage grapes get cutting edge winemaking | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Very few wine producing nations bring as much panache to their tastings as do the Italians.

The Italian Trade Commission recently sponsored its ninth annual tasting in Vancouver..
The Italians have sponsored tastings in Toronto and Montreal for 19 years; those cities are the major Canadian markets for Italian wine. In the last decade, Italy has made more of an effort in Western Canada as well, trying to win away consumers that buy most of their wine from Australia, California, South America and British Columbia.
Perhaps half of the 37 wineries at the Vancouver tasting have no wines in the market. Those wineries were looking for agents and listings in the BC Liquor Distribution Branch.
The LDB currently lists 460 Italian products, including multiple sizes and fortified products. Sales of Italian wines in British Columbia in the 12 months ended September 30 totalled $59.2 million, up five per cent from the previous 12 months.
It is a sliver of the market. The LDB’s total sales in the same 12 months were just under $3 billion.
But the Italian sliver is worth exploring, to discover the excellent “new world” styling of the wines. In the past decade or two, Italian producers have really raised the bar. And they are doing it with varietals that grow primarily in Italy. The taste profile of Italian wines is a refreshing change to palates that may have become jaded with Merlot and Shiraz.
Their edge comes from using varietals not even grown in much of the rest of the wine world. When you add those novel flavours to modern wine making, you get crisp, fresh whites without a trace of oxidation and you get juicy and appealing reds without the hard tannins of yesteryear.
Italy still offers the familiar brands that have been on the market for years and years, but made to improved quality standards. One example is a 45-year-old brand, Fazi Battaglia Verdicchio Classico ($14.99), a crisp, refreshing white still being sold in the green hourglass shaped bottle. Many of us bought it initially because the bottles, like the Chianti in the “fiasco” served well as candle holder.
Fazi Battaglia is an example of why the Italians are competitive. Verdicchio is an ancient variety that is planted widely in central Italy but hardly anywhere else. The LDB’s tasting notes speak of flavours of baked apple, hazelnut and ripe melon. The wine is light but it has its own personality...
...The bottom line is that the Italians, by adopting cutting edge winemaking techniques but not jettisoning their traditional varietals, are producing wines that are unique.

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Five Wines Meet Five Cheeses: Wines Paired with Cheeses from Around the World

Five Wines Meet Five Cheeses: Wines Paired with Cheeses from Around the World | Wines and People | Scoop.it

With nothing but the names of the four wines I was bringing, L’Apero’s team picked four cheeses to pair — plus a fifth wine and fifth cheese that, when our taste buds had settled, took home top prize. (Prices are for the wine.)

  • Treana White 2010, with Bucheron Mont Chevre: Read More
  • Falcone Family Vineyards Santa Maria Valley Chardonnay 2011, with Lou Bergier Pichin: Read More
  • Mulderbosch Rose of Cabernet Sauvignon 2011, with Cave-Aged Gruyere: Read More
  • Saladini Pilastri Rosso Piceno, with Villagio Provolone Picante: This organically grown blend of 70 percent sangiovese and 30 percent montepulciano proved a bit lighter than expected, but a nutty nose and zesty flavor managed to tackle the salty presence of this serious provolone. $11; saladinipilastri.it.
  • Tanner Dafoe Syrah 1er Cru, with Camembert au Lait Cru: Read More
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Boccadigabbia Rosso Piceno 2008

Boccadigabbia Rosso Piceno 2008 | Wines and People | Scoop.it

The Boccadigabbia estate was previously the wine growing portion of land owned by the Bonaparte administration, during which time French varietals were introduced and produced. In 1956 the Boccadigabbia portion was sold by the Bonaparte family to the Alessandri family, who have carried on the winemaking tradition initiated under the Bonaparte régime; adding indigenous Italian varietals alongside the French Pinot Noir and Cabernets. Today, Elvidio Alessandri along with his son Lorenzo has established Boccadigabbia as one of the top estates in the Marche region. The estate is certified by the strict environmental standards of the Marche Region. Organic fertilizers are used, but only if absolutely necessary, and they apply minimal amounts of sulphur to their wines. The Rosso Piceno DOC blend is their most popular red wine.

Deep red violet in colour, aromas of cherry and dried violets radiated from the glass. Tart cherry and pomegranate flavours were entwined with bright mint elements and supported by black tea tannins in the medium body. White pepper, fresh anise and hints of river stone minerals comprised the lengthy finish. Fruity, herbaceous and pleasantly dry, this is a wonderful glass that enjoys accompanying a meal.

  • 50% Montepulciano, 50% Sangiovese
  • Marche
  • Italy
  • Estate Bottled by Azienda Agricola Boccadigabbia
  • 14.5% Alcohol
  • $14


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How to get your wines to US market

How to get your wines to US market | Wines and People | Scoop.it
Two years ago, at a major Italian wine tasting in New York, I asked a Barolo winemaker friend if he had a suggestion for a new and interesting line of wines.

Via Aida Guemati
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Tufo (tufa) vs. calcareous, expressions of limestone in Italy

Tufo (tufa) vs. calcareous, expressions of limestone in Italy | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Above: Samples of tufaceous (left) and calcareous (right) subsoils from Jesi.  


Pievalta winery in the heart of the Castelli di Jesi.

The roughly ten-year-old winery is the first and only Demeter-certified winery in Jesi and the wines are truly stunning in their ability to deliver bright, balanced acidity with a breath-taking range of fruit and minerality.

We loved the wines and we loved Alessandro and Siliva, with whom we became fast friends (more on them later).

The wine Dominè (named after a local tavern keeper), made from grapes grown in calcareous soils. It was lighter in body and fresher than the more structured San Paolo Riserva, Tracie P’s favorite, grown partly in tufaceous soils, more tannic and unctuous and deeper in its minerality. Both wines were superb.

When you taste the wines with Alessandro and Silvia, Alessandro produces soil samples from their growing sites. I can’t think of a better way to illustrate the differences than the photo I snapped above and in the different expressions of Verdicchio that they bottle.

Not to be confused with Loire valley’s tuffeau (according to the Oxford Companion to Wine; in French, the Italian tufo is rendered as tufe or tuffe), “calcareous tufa [or tufo is] ‘a porous or vesicular carbonate of lime, generally deposited near the sources and along the courses of calcareous springs’ (Page Handbk. Geol. Terms, 1865),” according to the Oxford English Dictionary.

Calcareous, on the other hand, comes from calcaire, “French word for limestone, a rock largely made up of calcium carbonate, which may in English be described as calcareous” (Oxford Companion to Wine).

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Rosso Conero and Food Pairings

Rosso Conero and Food Pairings | Wines and People | Scoop.it
  • What Food to eat with Rosso Conero Red wine

Rosso Conero is a wine appellation in the Marche region of Italy. The red wines made here mainly use the Montepulciano grape which must consist of 85% of the wine's grape content. Rosso Conero are full bodied red wines that are dark and dense. You'll find plenty of black currant flavours along with black cherry and black raspberries. Read more [...]

  • Rosso Conero Wine Paired with Grilled Steak

Rosso Conero is a tongue staining red wine that will go extremely well with a steak. This wine boasts fruity and juicy flavours of black cherry, black raspberry and black currant, along with oak age qualities such as smoke. Read more [...]

  • Rosso Conero Red Wine and Game Stew

Rosso Conero is a hearty red wine that matches the body of stew. The fruity red flavours of Rosso Conero will mingle nicely and cancel out the gaminess that people sometimes find unpleasant with game stew.

  • What red wine to drink with Lasagna

Rosso Conero is a wonderful red wine to pair with Lasagna. The fruity red flavours of this wine lift up each component of the baked Lasagna allowing you taste the various layers of love that have been put into the preparation of this classic Italian dish. Read more [...]

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Grape Harvest and Starting to Make Wine

Grape Harvest and Starting to Make Wine | Wines and People | Scoop.it

We have a small vineyard with mostly Trebbiano grapes, a small sweet white grape that is used for making table wine and is one of the principal grapes in Le Marche’s DOC Falerio wine.

A few weeks ago along with our guests we harvested our grapes and are now making wine.

What a beautiful day it was…one of those lovely September days with hardly any humidity in the air with blue skies.

Next the grapes go into the crusher; ours is a small hand crank affair.

The crusher separates out the stems which would make the wine bitter. the green crates contain the stems which then can be distilled into Grappa, or in our case, composted.

It’s a sticky job!

Next the juice is put into a big bin, covered with a cloth to keep the wasps and other bugs out, and kept cool with ice. We used 5 liter jugs of frozen water. Our good friend, neighbor and superb wine maker Emanuele suggested we do this and keep it cool until the fermentation is done. Fermentation took over a week.

It’s wonderful to have guests who like to participate in farm activities…we all have fun. Now hopefully we’ll also have a nice white table wine to share with guests. I’ll keep you posted!

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Wines of Abruzzo & Le Marche, Italy

Wines of Abruzzo & Le Marche, Italy | Wines and People | Scoop.it

We tasted two wines from two wonderful regions, transporting us back on a journey to where they started in Italy. Our first was the Saladini Pilastri "Pregio del Conte", a 50/50 blend of Montepulciano and Aglianico, coming from the Le Marche region of Italy.

  • Le Marche is just East of Tuscany and Umbria. This is a deep ruby wine--pure beauty in a glass--possibly as awesome as the picturesque views of Italy itself. The Pregio del Conte has inviting aromas of black cherries and dark chocolate. We loved this wine before tasting it! Those black cherries showed through in flavor, along with some spice and a nice rustic dusty basement. Tannins were well balanced and were followed by a long smooth dry finish. This is a steal for an Italian wine at this price point.

Saladini Pilastri Pregio del Conte
Body: medium to full
Approx. Cost: $15
Food Pairing: Grilled or Roasted Pork

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Basics of Italian Wine and Food Pairings

Basics of Italian Wine and Food Pairings | Wines and People | Scoop.it
Sometimes opposites attract, but not always with wine and food. It’s not necessary to always get to mixed up into “what must be drunk with what” according to some wine aficionado’s.  Still, it’s important to remember to always match similar flavors and textures and make sure the intensity of the wine contributes to the flavor of the dish…not over-power it.
  • First, match wine with foods that have similar richness and texture. Think about what is going to bring out the characteristics of both. 
  • Balance tastes. Remember that salty and sour tastes in food will make wines taste milder (fruitier and less acidic), whereas most sweet and savory tastes make wines taste stronger (drier and more astringent).
  • Always try to balance the acidity of the food to the wine. 
  • The wine should always be just as sweet, or sweeter than what you’re eating.
  • Light, Medium and Full-bodied wines: When you are cooking, remember that light body wines like Pinot Grigio or Soave go well with steamed, lightly sauteed, or poached foods. Medium and full-bodied wines like Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Brunello or Barolo go better with grilled, roasted, or baked dishes that have intense flavors. 
  • Poultry: Game birds such quail, turkey, duck, and squab have earthy flavors that are more robust than chicken. Because of this, you should pair them with wines that can pick up those characteristics of spice and earth. A beautifully balanced Amarone pairs extremely nicely.
  • Fish and Seafood: There is a myth that seafood must be paired with white wine – but it does not always have to be.
  • Consider the region. 

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Elisabetta Tosi's curator insight, May 30, 2013 4:04 AM

A good start also for wines from Verona and Veneto...

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Cantina Bastianelli - Re David, Rusticus and Coppiò reviews

Review of the three red wines currently produced by Cantina Bastianelli in Monte San Pietrangeli, Marche. re david is a blackcurranty Merlot, rusticus a fruity but dry Sangiovese and coppiò is a Montepulciano-based balsamic-tasting delight.

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Major Spumante Wines Prevalent in Le Marche

Major Spumante Wines Prevalent in Le Marche | Wines and People | Scoop.it

There is a wide range of Spumante wine in Italy especially from Le Marche where the base grape is often Verdicchio but can also be from Montipulciano or Sangiovese or Pinot Noir grapes. I recommend twelve Spumante wines from the region that are of exceptional quality at a reasonable price. the region of Le Marche is gaining recognition for the wine making skills and quality of wines that have existed for centuries but are only now being appraised and appreciated in global markets with exports increasing each year.

Major Spumante Wines Prevalent in the Marches:

  1. Stefano Antonucci Brut – Spumante Metodo Classico - SANTA BARBARA – Barbara ANCONA.
  2. Donna Giulia Brut – Spumante Metodo Classico - (Vendemmia 2007 Sboccatura 2010) FATTORIA LE TERRAZZE - Numana (ANCONA)
  3. Umani Ronchi Extra Brut sans année- Spumante Metodo Classico (Sboccatura settembre 2011) UMANI RONCHI – Osimo ANCONA
  4. Fazi Battaglia Brut – Vino Spumante- FAZI BATTAGLIA – Castelplanio ANCONA
  5. Madreperla Brut – Spumante Metodo Classico Cuvée - (Sboccatura 2011) MONCARO - Montecarotto ANCONA
  6. Vignamato Rosé Brut - Vino Spumante - VIGNAMATO – San Paolo di Jesi ANCONA
  7. Conti di Buscareto Rosé Brut 2011 – Vino Spumante Brut Metodo Martinotti CONTI DI BUSCARETO – Ostra ANCONA
  8. Vallerosa Bonci Metodo Classico Millesimato Brut 2008- Spumante Metodo Classico (Sboccatura 2011) VALLEROSA BONCI – Cupramontana ANCONA
  9. Cuvée Nadir Brut 2010 – Spumante Metodo Charmat- BELISARIO – Matelica (MC)
  10. Primo Brut – Spumante Metodo Classico CASALFARNETO – Serra de’ Conti ANCONA
  11. Moroder Brut Rosé 2011 – Vino Spumante - MORODER – Ancona
  12. Pink Brut Rosé – Vino Spumante -SILVANO STROLOGO - CameranoANCONA


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ColleStefano Verdicchio di Matelica 2010

ColleStefano Verdicchio di Matelica 2010 | Wines and People | Scoop.it

A gorgeous Verdicchio that brings together minerality, fleshy fruit, nuts and honey. A quartet that really works.

Quite profound minerality of slate or black stones – evident both on the nose and palate. The fruit composure is mostly that of peach and nectarine, and there is a definite honey almond nougat note. Finishes with a curious wheaty taste, which I like.

I wouldn’t say it has a notable textural element (especially when compared to many other Italian whites), but it doesn’t have to when its other attributes are so admirable. If you want an Italian white that offers more to think about than the average Pinot Grigio, this is where you should be looking.

Very Good / 91 points

Closure: Cork

Source: Retail

Price: ~$30

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Two Wines from the Middle of Italy

Two Wines from the Middle of Italy | Wines and People | Scoop.it

This post features two wines which were fun to taste. The Garofoli was the more elegant of the two. It started off as a solid drink but then took a turn to show what was in store. I would cellar this for another year. The Il Sogno & La Pietra has a dense, chewy, tannic personality which I very much enjoy. It could stand a few years for the fruit to expand and the tannins integrate but it works great if you drink it by a fire. These wines were purchased at MacArthur Beverages.

  • 2007 Garofoli, Piancarda, Rosso Conero – $16 - Imported by Grappoli Imports. This wine is 100% Montepulciano which underwent malolactic fermentation then was aged for one year in oak casks. Alcohol 14%. The light nose revealed plum and blue fruits. In the mouth the flavors were a little ripe with some focus to the cool blue fruits, and spice. Blue and black fruit mixed with good spicy, drying tannins that coated the inside of the lips. There was red fruit acidity and moderate weight. The wine dramatically opened up after one hour to show youthful, fresh flavors with pencil lead and wood tannins. **(*) 2013-2019.
  • 2009 Il Sogno & La Pietra, La Pietra, Paestum – $22 - read more
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Umani Ronchi: Le Marche Wines

Founded in the 1950s by the Bianchi-Bernetti family. Today, Massimo Bernetti and his son Michele manage Umani Ronchi's 210 hectares (518 acres) which lie in both Le Marche and Abruzzo. Umani Ronchi produces a large variety of both white and red wines, all of which are made from their own grapes. Over the past four years a number of these have won prestigious awards. Ulisse Patalocchi La Rose was our host and guide for the visit to Umani Ronchi's winery located just outside the city of Osimo. The winery itself is very modern and well maintained. It features an architectural masterpiece in its aging cellar. The cellar was built by excavating the hillside under one of the vineyards and installing bricks and gravel to balance the moisture.

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Best SLOW WINE Wines 2013 Le Marche Region

Best SLOW WINE Wines 2013 Le Marche Region | Wines and People | Scoop.it

VINO SLOW

  • PODERE CAPECCI OFFIDA PECORINO CIPREA 2011
  • VALLEROSA BONCI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. S. MICHELE 2010
  • LA STAFFA VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. LA RINCROCCA 2010
  • MA.RI.CA VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. TOSIUS 2010
  • TENUTA DELL’UGOLINO VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. VIGNETO DEL BALLUCCIO 2011
  • MONACESCA VERDICCHIO DI MATELICA RIS. MIRUM 2010
  • ANDREA FELICI CASTELLI JESI VERDICCHIO RIS. CL. IL CANTICO DELLA FIGURA 2009
  • PIEVALTA VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. RIS. SAN PAOLO 2009
  • VALTURIO MARCHE ROSSO VALTURIO 2010
  • MAROTTI CAMPI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SALMARIANO RIS. 2009
  • AURORA MARCHE ROSSO BARRICADIERO 2010
  • MORODER CONERO RIS. DORICO 2008
  • TAVIGNANO CASTELLI JESI VERDICCIO RIS. CL. MISCO 2010

GREAT WINE

  • VELENOSI OFFIDA PECORINO VILLA ANGELA 2011
  • SANTA BARBARACASTELLI JESI VERDICCHIO RIS. CL. STEFANO ANTONUCCI 2010
  • GAROFOLI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. PODIUM 2010
  • UMANI RONCHI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. VECCHIE VIGNE 2010
  • BUCCI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. RIS. VILLA BUCCI 2009
  • OASI DEGLI ANGELI KURNI 2010

EVERYDAY WINE

  • GAROFOLI VERDICCHIO SUP. MACRINA 2011
  • ANDREA FELICI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. ANDREA FELICI 2011
  • PODERI MATTIOLI VERDICCHIO C. JESI CL. SUP. YLICE 2011
  • FATTORIA SAN LORENZO VERDICCHIO C. JESI DI GINO 2011
  • TENUTA SPINELLI OFFIDA PECORINO ARTEMISIA 2011
  • DE ANGELIS ROSSO PICENO SUP. 2009
  • SAN GIOVANNI OFFIDA PECORINO KIARA 2011
  • GIOVANNI GIUSTI MARCHE ROSSO L’INTRUSO 2009
  • MORODER ROSSO CONERO MORODER 2009
  • VELENOSI ROSSO PICENO SUP. BRECCIAROLO 2009
  • BORGO PAGLIANETTO VERDICCHIO MATELICA TERRA VIGNATA'11
  • AURORA OFFIDA PECORINO FIOBBO 2010
  • CLARA MARCELLI ROSSO PICENO SUP. 2010

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Luigi Silvestri's curator insight, December 30, 2012 2:35 PM

Marche is a land of infinite discovery, not anly art, music, poetry and sightseeing but also food and wine; slow food and slow wine; you can add slow talking as long as it's a pleasure to eat and drink while talking about ancient stories about Marche (Italy).

 

www.accantogroup.com/accantowine

luigi.silvestri@accantogroup.com

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Ossessione Marche Rosso: Le Marche wine Made in USA by Mosby

Ossessione Marche Rosso: Le Marche wine Made in USA by Mosby | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Mosby Winery in Buellton, CA makes exclusively Italian varietals in the classic styles of their origins.
Ossessione, that has an incredibly artistic and beautiful label made by the artist named Robert Scherer, is a true Italian import with the grapes coming from Marche, Italy near the Adriatic Sea.
True to its heritage, Ossessione has brilliant ruby color and an intoxicating nose with perfume-like notes of woodsy sandalwood, brown spice and maple. Flavors, of dried red currant and spice finish with medium tannins and a hint of vanilla. The wine is ready to drink now, and would paor very well with roasted meat dishes or a selection of Italian cured meats served in the antipasti style.

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How to taste wine and understanding the olfactory system

A detailed animation on how to taste wine like a professional and understanding the mechanism behind it.

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White 2011 "Oris" Falerio dei Colli Ascolani DOP - Ciu' Ciu'

White 2011 "Oris" Falerio dei Colli Ascolani DOP - Ciu' Ciu' | Wines and People | Scoop.it
  • Style of Wine: Light & Crisp
  • Country of Origin: Italy
  • Wine Region: Marche
  • Grape Varietal: Trebbiano and Pecorino
  • Certified organic.
  • 13.0% Alc./Vol.
  • Bottle Format: 750ml
  • Case Size: 12 bottles
  • $189.12 Per Case ($15.76/btl)
  • Tasting Notes

Blend of Pecorino, Passerina and Trebbiano. All grapes are grown organically, without any systemic fungicides, pesticides or herbicides. Fermented in 100% stainless steel. The vineyard is trained as spur pruned cordon, in the towns of Offida and Acquaviva Picena, in Ascoli Piceno province at 250-300 metres above sea level.

Tasting notes: Brilliant, pale yellow with green hues, this wine has an enticing tropical-fruit driven nose. Notes of honeysuckle, lychee, peach pit, spearmint, fresh almonds and a touch of white pepper are evident on the nose. On the palate, the wine is medium bodied, with balanced alcohol and acid. The weight of the wine is plump, fresh and viscous, with a caressing mouthfeel. Creamy lychee, almonds and crushed rock fill the mouth and linger on a medium to long finish. Delicious, fun and fruity, enjoy now with grilled chicken or a l’aperitif with a variety hors d’oeuvres, including spicy shrimp, sashimi or prosciutto.


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Viva La Lacrima di Morro d'Alba

Viva La Lacrima di Morro d'Alba | Wines and People | Scoop.it

I had the opportunity to try some distinctive varietals the other night with my wine peeps. As Italy has over 800 different grape varietals, you're bound to taste something you've never tasted before. Enter the Lacrima Di Morro D'Alba. Every one of us in that room was astounded by this wine. D'arci couldn't stop smelling it, and James...well let's just say...his comment couldn't have come from anyone else BUT James! (And I wouldn't want to misquote him, so I choose not to repeat it... :)

From Marotti Campi in the province of Ancona in Marche, Italy, this grape is rarely found outside the town of Morro D'Alba. So literally, this is the Lacrima grape FROM Morro D'Alba. Lacrima means "tear" in Italian. It's name was either derived from it's "teardrop" shape or alternatively, it's thin skin that allows tear-like drops of juice to drip from the grape.

And I... have never had anything like this. First of all, I also couldn't keep my nose out of the glass! Distinctive notes of violets, rosewater and green cardamom. For me, all blending into...wait for it...Chanel No.5! What?? Thank goodness it didn't TASTE like Chanel No.5, although what was in my nose, was very much on the palate! The rosewater, violets and spice continued!

At 38 bucks, you better know this is what you want! And pairings? With such a complex grape/wine, I believe simple is better. The key is to have either your wine shine, or your food shine. This wine is worth shining, so keep your food simple like a beef or pork tenderloin with good old salt and pepper!

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Luigi Silvestri's curator insight, December 22, 2012 7:25 AM

Lorenzo produces its Lacrima in the heart of Italian Marche Region.

Best awarded Lacrima, not to miss.

www.accantogroup.com/accantowine

luigi.silvestri@accantogroup.com