Wines and People
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The Le Marche region has a lot to offer to wine lovers. There are 5 DOCG wines and 16 DOC wines. From the prestigious and famous Verdicchio, to the Vernaccia di Serrapetrona, from the Offida Pecorino to the Offida Passerina. Also: Bianchello del Metauro, Colli Maceratesi, Colli Pesaresi, Esino, Falerio dei Colli Ascolani, I Terreni di Sanseverino, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba, Rosso Conero, Pergola, Rosso Piceno, San Ginesio Many of these wines are little known outside of Italy but visitors to the region have a pleasant surprise when they try the local wine produced by many small aziendas and cantinas.
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Le Marche wines, vines and people

The Le Marche region has a lot to offer to wine lovers. There are 5 DOCG wines and 16 DOC wines. From the prestigious and famous Verdicchio, to tthe Vernaccia di Serrapetrona, from the Offida Pecorino to the Offida Passerina. Also: Bianchello del Metauro, Colli Maceratesi, Colli Pesaresi, Esino, Falerio dei Colli Ascolani, I Terreni di Sanseverino, Lacrima di Morro d'Alba, Rosso Conero, Pergola, Rosso Piceno, San Ginesio

Many of these wines are little known outside of Italy but visitors to the region have a pleasant surprise when they try the local wine produced by many small aziendas and cantinas. 

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Passerina: A white like a little sparrow

Passerina: A white like a little sparrow | Wines and People | Scoop.it

Loosely translated, the noun, or rather proper noun “Passerina” in Italian means “little sparrow”. And indeed the more you get to know this charming grape, the more you begin to understand how well the moniker suits the vine to which it’s applied, but first a little back ground on this rare bird…


  • La Murola Passerina Marche IGT 2010  Slightly greenish, pale white gold color. Pretty but subtlely sassy nose of cooked grain, apricot jam, white pepper, citrus peel, hazelnut, and dried white flowers. The wine’s entry on the palate is fresh and lively, but with a clean, corpulent rich texture, and complex and evolving flavors of woody herbs, pear, yellow cherry nectar, minerals, and quinine. Pretty, lingering flavors of peach pit and caramel flan on the finish.
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What is Grape Phylloxera?

What is Grape Phylloxera? | Wines and People | Scoop.it

A scourge erupted in Europe that nearly destroyed every single wine grape in the world. In the late 1800′s, wineries all over Europe ripped up and burned their family’s ancient vineyards in a desperate attempt to stop the spread of disease. By the 1900′s Phylloxera had taken a beyond-imaginable toll: over 70% of the vines in France were dead –the livelihoods of thousands of families were ruined.
There was an international wine deficit. In one scenario, three small precious plots of Pinot Noir owned by Bollinger in Champagne magically resisted Phylloxera. The resulting 3000 bottles of wine called “Vieille Vignes Françaises” (French Old Vines) became the most sought-after bottles of Champagne. Devastated by the wrath, the Minister of Agriculture and Commerce in France offered 20,000 Francs –$1 million today– to anyone who could find a cure.
So what was the cause of the grape phylloxera destruction and how come there is still no cure?
What is Grape Phylloxera?
Phylloxera is a microscopic louse or aphid, that lives on and eats roots of grapes. It can infest a vineyard from the soles of vineyard worker’s boots or naturally spreading from vineyard-to-vineyard by proximity.
Where did Phylloxera come from? short answer: The United States.
The genus Phylloxera is characterized by having three-jointed antennae, the third or terminal much the longest, and by carrying its wings overlapping flat on the back instead of roof-fashion. It belongs to the whole-winged bugs (Homoptera), and osculates between two great families of that sub-order, the plant-lice (Aphididae) on the one hand and the bark-lice {Coccidae) on the other. In the one-jointed tarsus of the larva or newly-hatched louse, and in being always oviparous, it shows its affinities with the latter family; but in the two-jointed tarsus of the more mature individuals, and in all other characters, it is essentially aphididan.
(CHAS. V. RILEY, M. A., Ph. D. “The Grape Phylloxera” Popular Science, May 1874)
European Wine Grapes with American Roots
Today rootstock is still used for much of the wine world and phylloxera is still a danger.
There have been several cases where vineyards have remained untouched by grape phylloxera. While many of these locations are a mystery, a high proportion of the phylloxera-resistant vineyards have sandy soils in areas with high winds.

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