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12 Maps That Changed the World

12 Maps That Changed the World | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
Is there such a thing as a perfect map?

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The Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips

The Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
I am a freak for the American road trip. And I'm not alone, as some of this country's best writers have taken a shot at describing that quintessentially American experience.The above map is the result of a painstaking and admittedly quixotic effort to catalog the country as it has been described in the American road-tripping literature. It includes every place-name reference in 12 books about cross-country travel, from Mark Twain’s Roughing It (1872) to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild (2012), and maps the authors’ routes on top of one another. You can track an individual writer’s descriptions of the landscape as they traveled across it, or you can zoom in to see how different authors have written about the same place at different times.

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Where Americans Are Killed By Guns: US Homicide & Suicide Death Rates

Where Americans Are Killed By Guns: US Homicide & Suicide Death Rates | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
33,169 people were killed by guns in the US in 2013. However, the rates at which people were killed by guns varied widely between states and regions.

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Australia Is Not as Down Under as Everyone Thinks It Is

Australia Is Not as Down Under as Everyone Thinks It Is | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
That map of Australia you have? It’s wrong. And the whole country is going to officially relocate north to correct the error.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

Maps need to be updated for a wide range of reasons.  Tectonic plate movements require that we adjust things from where they used to be, to where they are now.  This can be an expensive proposition, but critical for pinpoint precision that may GPS-based technological applications need. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 2016 3:23 PM

Maps need to be updated for a wide range of reasons.  Tectonic plate movements require that we adjust things from where they used to be, to where they are now.  This can be an expensive proposition, but critical for pinpoint precision that may GPS-based technological applications need. 

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How the first city got started 12,000 years ago

"In this animated video, Jonathan F. P. Rose explains how the first city was started in Turkey, 12,000 years ago."


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Deanna Wiist's insight:

What led to the first urban settlements? We know that the beginnings of agriculture are closely connected to the first forays into agriculture and the domestication of animals.  This brief video puts some archeological specificity on the though exercise, "what would you need to start the first city in a world without cities?" 

 

Tags: urban, placehistorical.

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Samuel bennett's curator insight, May 11, 2017 11:02 AM
In this video it talks about how the first city was started in turkey and how it evolved and became a civilization. In my world cultural geography class we talked about urbanization and how the development of city's came. This video ties in to our class and everything we have been taking about and it gives a visual on how the first city developed which gives me a better understanding of how the early city's work.
Angel Peeples's curator insight, May 11, 2017 2:41 PM
  This article is related to world cultural by being about urbanization. My opinion on this article is that I cant believe that it was that long ago the first city started. Turkey was the first place of the first city because it was were agriculture started. I think it is pretty cool it all started with a structure that people just started building around. 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
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Making cities sustainable with urban agriculture

Making cities sustainable with urban agriculture | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
To reduce the pressure on the world's productive land and to help assure long-term food security, writes Herbert Girardet, city people are well advised to revive urban or peri-urban agriculture. While large cities will always have to import some food, local food growing is a key component of sustainable urban living.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

Urban agriculture is right at the perfect intersection for human geographers who focus on both urban networks and food systems--clearly this is an important overlap that deserves a more detailed look. 

 

Tags: food, consumption, sustainability, socioeconomic, food desert, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture

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MrsJohnnoTeach's curator insight, May 14, 2017 3:39 AM

This article could be used for the Year 7 Geography Curriculum Unit 2: Place and Liveability, "examining whether liveability and environmental sustainability can be enhanced at the same time".  It talks about urban agriculture...

Matt Le Lacheur's curator insight, May 14, 2017 7:29 PM

This article links well with my Authentic Learning post on my blog http://mattgdlt.weebly.com/the-whiteboard.html . A unit of work could easily be designed around the concept of sustainable food in an urban environment. The topic links in to the year 9 content descriptor (ACSSU176) under Science Understanding Biological Science.

M Sullivan's curator insight, August 28, 2017 8:48 AM
Urban farming - an important factor in making megacities sustainable.
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New Urbanism

"New Urbanism is a planning and development approach based on the principles of how cities and towns had been built for the last several centuries: walkable blocks and streets, housing and shopping in close proximity, and accessible public spaces. In other words: New Urbanism focuses on human-scaled urban design."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 15, 2017 8:58 AM

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

aliyah marie scarb's curator insight, May 25, 2017 10:34 PM
New urbanism is a type of urbanization. In new urbanism, everything is built so that it's in walking distance of other things mostly such as Winn Dixie and McDonald's in Callahan. 
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Esri GeoInquiries™ for World History

Esri GeoInquiries™ for World History | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The Esri Education Outreach team is pleased to announce the release of a sample pack from the forthcoming GeoInquiries™ collection for World History classrooms.  The sample pack includes the first four activities supporting high school World History instruction with ArcGIS Online.  Eleven additional activities will be released over the coming weeks."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

ESRI has produced GeoInquires for Earth Science, US History, Environmental Science, AP Human Geography, 4th grade, and has recently released a now has a set for World History.

Tagsmappinggeospatialempire, historical, ESRI, K12, edtech.

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A History Of Sudan's Civil Wars & Conflict

This is the story of how Sudan became two nations, and of an ongoing conflict in the Nuba Mountains that has changed the lives of millions of people. In parts 2–5 of our VR series, We Who Remain, follow the lives of four people living through the war: http://ajplus.co/nuba360. Produced in partnership with Nuba Reports and Emblematic Group.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

The first video in this 5-part video is a bit slow, but provides the historical and geographic context needed to understand the developmental, ethnic, and political issues that remain so difficult to resolve.  The Subsequent four videos provide a more human, personal glimpse into facets of the conflict. 

 

Tags: Sudan, politicalethnicity, Africa, war.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 11, 2017 8:23 PM
Unit 4 - Political Geography, International Conflict, Multinational States, Centrifugal Forces
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 7:58 PM
Global Challenges: political geography
Matt Manish's curator insight, May 2, 11:47 PM
From this video one can see how crucial borders can be to neighboring ethnic groups, especially in Sudan. North Sudan is made up of mostly Arabs and Muslims, while mainly Christians live in South Sudan. Also, the majority of North Sudan is black while the majority of South Sudan is white. Due to these two ethnic groups being so different and previously being grouped into one country, much fighting and a devastating civil war has broken out over the past few decades. Recently within the last decade Sudan was officially divided up into two nations because of the ongoing fighting and cultural differences which seems to be a step in the right direction to reduce the amount of fighting between the two countries.
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Five gentrification myths debunked

'Gentrification' is a messy bogeyman of a term deserving more critical analysis. If 'gentrification' is 'exclusive economic development', what we want is INCLUSIVE economic development.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 19, 2017 11:09 AM

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 6, 2017 8:16 AM
Unit 7 - Gentrifications - specifically addressing "generalizations about Gentrification." 
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A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard

A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
Henderson Island is isolated and uninhabited—but its beaches are still covered in garbage.  

 

Henderson Island (article or podcast) is about the most remote place you can visit without leaving the planet. It sits squarely in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 miles from South America in the other.  Henderson should be pristine. It is uninhabited. Tourists don’t go there. There’s no one around to drop any litter. The whole place was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in 1988. The nearest settlement is 71 miles away, and has just 40 people on it. And yet, seafaring plastic has turned it into yet another of humanity’s scrapheaps.

 

Tags: pollutionOceaniawater, environmentsustainability, consumption.


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M Sullivan's curator insight, November 29, 2017 11:23 PM
Useful for the IDU topic of plastic single use water bottles.
Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 26, 1:49 PM
If I had looked at this picture without the context, I would think it was somewhere where people had stayed for a while and then left the place trashed with their own garbage.  In reality,  this is an island that is 3500 miles away from the nearest major settlement and doesn’t have any human inhabitants.  This really exemplifies that even though plastic waste may not be in one’s backyard, it never truly goes away.  Plastic is a material that cannot be broken down, so when it is dumped it just moves around until it hits land.  The article pointed out that plastic is incredibly difficult to clean up, particularly on places like Henderson Island.  When it floats in the ocean for a long time, it becomes brittle and breaks into very small fragments.  Those small fragments then mix with the sand and get buried, making it impossible to get rid of.  Another fact about this island that was shocking is that 3,750 pieces of litter wash up everyday, which is 100,000 times than other islands.  Henderson Island is not suitable for humans to live on, as there is no freshwater, frequent storms, and incredibly sharp terrain.  It is interesting that an island that keeps humans away can’t defend itself against plastic.  The reach of humans extends far beyond what they imagine and even uninhabitable land is infested with human waste.  No matter how remote a place is, it will still be effected by people.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, September 28, 7:32 PM
The trash at Henderson Island is so bad that the animals now live there life in trash literally. The crabs use trash in lieu of seashells because there is more junk available than a natural resource that should be found at a beach. Another major issue with Henderson Island is the fact that no person lives within 70 miles from the beach so where does all this trash come from. The major issue here is how people from nations so far away can destroy a desolate island. This article shows us how these days trash spreads faster and further than ideas. The trash epidemics only effects are negative, it destroys habitats, it kills and destroys places that could be so bueatiful like Henderson Island. 
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Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers

Infographic: North Korea by the Numbers | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

North Korea – a country hard to illustrate by numbers and those available are based on estimates. Accordingly, this graphic intends to give an overview on relevant aspects of a country hardly known by outsiders. Overall, we know little about the isolated northern part of the Korean peninsula and what we know is mostly disturbing: The DPRK’s government headed by Kim Jong-un has recently launched another missile test, adding up to 14 tests only in 2017.

Besides that, the country is estimated to be among the most militarised on the globe with more than a million active soldiers and an air force counting 944 aircrafts in total. Thus, North Korea is ranked 23rd (out of 133 countries) for military spending which approximately amounts to $7.5 billion per year. According to the CIA, young adults are obliged to spend several years in the military service, women around seven and men even ten years.

But above all, North Korea is a country that is desperately poor. Out of an estimated 25,115,311 inhabitants, only 36 percent of the population has access to electricity and the GDP per capita amounts to $1,700 – similar to that of South Sudan.

 

TagsNorth Korea, infographic.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, August 12, 2017 11:50 AM
'cause you know....Venezuela.  
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2017 7:53 PM
Political geography: global challenges
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 10:04 AM
North Korea is constantly in the news, but do we really know much about it. Before the US conflicts with Afghanistan and Iraq we all never very little about those countries. While we have had past history with North Korea, it is always good to understand the country and the people in the conflict. This is an easy info graphic to view and gives you simple knowledge on the country such as population, workforce number, military numbers, and other useful numbers that can be discussed.  As shown in the numbers military spending and military service time is a high priority which should not be a shocker if you ever turn on the news. However, one should also see that North Korea is a very poor country and most live in poverty. Very few have access to electricity and living conditions are not up to standards. So we can ask ourselves are the North Koreans spending money wisely? Well from this graphic probably not. We can begin to understand some of the issues (although there so many) with this country and why it can be a problem to the US and to the world.  A country basically run by a dictatorship with high military spending and a very high poverty rate is unacceptable. It would be fun to use other graphics on this page to begin to understand other countries as well, a good website to view. 
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The American West, 150 Years Ago

The American West, 150 Years Ago | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
In the 1860s and 70s, photographer Timothy O'Sullivan created some of the best-known images in American History. After covering the U.S. Civil War, (many of his photos appear in this earlier series), O'Sullivan joined a number of expeditions organized by the federal government to help document the new frontiers in the American West. The teams were composed of soldiers, scientists, artists, and photographers, and tasked with discovering the best ways to take advantage of the region's untapped natural resources. O'Sullivan brought an amazing eye and work ethic, composing photographs that evoked the vastness of the West. He also documented the Native American population as well as the pioneers who were already altering the landscape. Above all, O'Sullivan captured -- for the first time on film -- the natural beauty of the American West in a way that would later influence Ansel Adams and thousands more photographers to come.

 

Tags: images, artlandscape, tourism, historicalUSA.


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27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing

27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
Tellingly, the bulk of the collection comes from cable TV news.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:39 PM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:50 PM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

Flaviu Fesnic's curator insight, August 6, 2015 2:51 AM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

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Inside the Secret World of Russia’s Cold War Mapmakers

Inside the Secret World of Russia’s Cold War Mapmakers | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Soviet military mapped the entire world, but few have seen the actual, physical maps—until now.

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Fascinating Relief Maps Show the World's Topography

Fascinating Relief Maps Show the World's Topography | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
The amazing relief maps below were created by Russian Anton Balazh with data provided by NASA. You can find additional renders of Earth at his stock photos portfolio at Shutterstock where you can buy some of his works in high resolution.

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The Incredible growth of megacities

The Incredible growth of megacities | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The world’s cities are booming and their growth is changing the face of the planet. Around 77 million people are moving from rural to urban areas each year. The latest UN World Cities Report has found that the number of “megacities” – those with more than 10 million people – has more than doubled over the past two decades, from 14 in 1995 to 29 in 2016. And whereas the developed world was once the home of the biggest cities, this map shows that it is now the developing world taking the lead."

 

Tags: urban, megacities, regions.


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Carson Dean Williamson's curator insight, May 11, 2017 10:43 AM
This relates to our chapter by showing some facts on mega cities. Mega cities are metropolitan areas that have a high population. These cities are the definition of urban development around the world. There is currently 29 mega cities (since 2016) around the world. This article showed the growth of mega cities and urban development of the city.
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Melih Pekyatirmaci's curator insight, May 20, 2017 7:31 PM
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Maps of racial diversity in the United States

Maps of racial diversity in the United States | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Repurposed NASA maps show the racial diversity (and segregation) of the United States in more detail than ever before."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

This interactive map of population density in the United States also shows ethnic categories as defined by the U.S. census.  Please explore this map at a variety of scales and in distinct locales.   

 

Questions to Ponder: Is this a map of ethnic diversity patterns or is it a map of racial segregation?  How come?  Is there additional information that you would need to decide?  This review of the map on Wired and Atlantic Cities described this map as a map depicting segregation: why would they say that? 

 

Tags: mapping, density, ethnicity, race.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 2017 2:27 PM

This interactive map of population density in the United States also shows ethnic categories as defined by the U.S. census.  Please explore this map at a variety of scales and in distinct locales.   

 

Questions to Ponder: Is this a map of ethnic diversity patterns or is it a map of racial segregation?  How come?  Is there additional information that you would need to decide?  This review of the map on Wired and Atlantic Cities described this map as a map depicting segregation: why would they say that? 

 

Tags: mapping, density, ethnicity, race.

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Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 2017 3:14 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 2017 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 16, 2017 8:03 AM
Population unit 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 2017 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

josiewern's curator insight, December 8, 2017 4:33 AM

unit 2 article 1              2

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Enclaves & Exclaves

Enclaves & Exclaves | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it
A tour of the world's engulfed and orphaned places.

Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

This storymap is a full length article about all the intricacies about enclaves and exclaves, but the interactive format, visuals and maps really make this much more than another article on the topic.    

 

Tags: borders, political, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 15, 2017 3:20 PM

This storymap is a full length article about all the intricacies about enclaves and exclaves, but the interactive format, visuals and maps really make this much more than another article on the topic.    

 

Tags: borders, political, mappingESRIStoryMap.

Mr Mac's curator insight, July 3, 2017 12:08 PM
Unit 1 - Mapping; Unit 3/4 - Ethnic Enclaves and Exclaves 
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 2017 6:08 PM

Political geography 

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As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger

As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The wealthiest country, which spends the most money on care for the sick, has far from the best health outcomes. Babies born in eastern Kentucky, along the Mississippi Delta and on Native American reservations in the Dakotas have the lowest life expectancies in the country. If current health trends continue, they aren’t expected to live much beyond an average of 70 years. Meanwhile, a baby born along the wealthy coast of California can be expected to live as long as 85 years, the authors found."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 2017 3:06 PM

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

Julia May's curator insight, July 20, 2017 1:21 PM
Very interesting article but a haunting truth! 
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25 Photos That Will Make You Fall in Love With Norway

25 Photos That Will Make You Fall in Love With Norway | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

"So how gorgeous is Norway? From its majestic wildlife, captivating Northern Lights shows, and snowy mountains, to its vivid landscapes, and mystifying fjords, Norway is a must-visit destination for anyone who loves the outdoors. Plus, opportunities for hiking, kayaking, glacier climbing, fishing, and skiing are endless! If Noway wasn’t already on your travel bucket list, I bet it is now!"


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

My wife lived in Norway for 18 months, and her love for this country is infectious.  The stunning physical geography leads to some equally magnificent cultural landscapes that were forged in a very rugged, inhospitable environment for early human settlers.   

 

Tags: Norway, place, tourismphysical, Arctic, geo-inspiration, images, artlandscape.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 2017 1:28 PM

My wife lived in Norway for 18 months, and her love for this country is infectious.  The stunning physical geography leads to some equally magnificent cultural landscapes that were forged in a very rugged, inhospitable environment for early human settlers.   

 

Tags: Norway, place, tourismphysical, Arctic, geo-inspiration, images, artlandscape.

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Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy | Wildcat Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In [recent years], the South’s 150-year reverence for the Confederacy was shaken. Public officials responded to the national mourning and outcry by removing prominent public displays of its most recognizable symbol [the flag]. It became a moment of deep reflection for a region where the Confederate flag is viewed by many white Southerners as an emblem of their heritage and regional pride despite its association with slavery, Jim Crow and the violent resistance to the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s."


Via Seth Dixon
Deanna Wiist's insight:

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 16, 2017 12:55 PM

Just a few more links that I've added to the article, Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments.  Right now, many people are calling for the removal of all memorials that honor the Confederacy and the call for the removal of all Confederate monuments is in full swing.  

 

Tags: monuments, the South, architectureracecultural norms, landscape.

Treathyl Fox's comment, August 17, 2017 10:22 AM
Nobody in Iraq is debating the pulling down of the statue of Saddam Hussein. It's about what his statue "represented" to a people. It's the same thing with the Confederate symbols. America has an “80%” minority population. (The 80% is a joke.) From the Native Americans to anybody else in that percentage, you won't hear any of them arguing to defend the Confederacy as their “history” and “heritage”. Get real!