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IoT Manufacturer Survey Cites Key Trends You Should Know

IoT Manufacturer Survey Cites Key Trends You Should Know | Wifi hack android | Scoop.it
A recent article by Forbes, “Where Internet of Things Initiatives Are Driving Revenue Now” offers several insights from a recent IoT Global Trend Study performed by Tata Consulting Services. The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways: Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018. 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies. Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives: Product monitoring (31.1%) Customer monitoring (26.6%) Supply chain monitoring (23.2%) Premises monitoring (19%) Top two areas where business models...

Via Richard Platt
DAMskill's insight:

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:Product monitoring (31.1%)Customer monitoring (26.6%)Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)Premises monitoring (19%)Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:Increasing the service business (40%)Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:Increase the services business (40.3%)Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
more...
Jean-Marc Menat's curator insight, August 1, 2015 7:51 AM

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

  • Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.
  • 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.
  • Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:
    • Product monitoring (31.1%)
    • Customer monitoring (26.6%)
    • Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)
    • Premises monitoring (19%)
  • Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:
    • Increasing the service business (40%)
    • Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)
  • By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:
    • Increase the services business (40.3%)
    • Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)
    • Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
Jean-Marc Menat's curator insight, August 1, 2015 7:55 AM

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

  • Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.
  • 47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.
  • Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:
    • Product monitoring (31.1%)
    • Customer monitoring (26.6%)
    • Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)
    • Premises monitoring (19%)
  • Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:
    • Increasing the service business (40%)
    • Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)
  • By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:
    • Increase the services business (40.3%)
    • Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)
    • Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
Pierre-Pascal Bavaud's curator insight, August 10, 2015 9:04 AM

The study surveyed 795 industrial manufacturing executives - here are some key takeaways:

Industrial manufacturers predict IoT initiatives will increase revenue 27.1% from 2015 to 2018.47.7% of market leaders are driving revenue from customer product usage data versus 20% of IoT follower companies.Priorities that enterprises are assigning to IoT initiatives:Product monitoring (31.1%)Customer monitoring (26.6%)Supply chain monitoring (23.2%)Premises monitoring (19%)Top two areas where business models being re-defined by IoT initiatives:Increasing the service business (40%)Driving revenue with customer product usage data (27%)By 2020, IoT initiatives are projected to:Increase the services business (40.3%)Drive greater revenue with product usage data (28.7%)Bypass entities in the distribution channel (22.8%)
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Here’s That Lexus Hoverboard Finally in Action

Here’s That Lexus Hoverboard Finally in Action | Wifi hack android | Scoop.it
After a month of teasers and speculation, Lexus has finally shown off its real, live, working hoverboard.

Via Richard Platt
DAMskill's insight:

Lexus has finally shown off its real, live, working hoverboard.  That cool-looking steam coming off of the sides isn’t decorative; it’s liquid nitrogen, cooling the superconductors to -321 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature at which they become superconducting. Not surprising, given that riding the Lexus hoverboard is basically like straddling a maglev train. the hoverboard relies on superconductors and magnets. The biggest disappointment for hoverboard enthusiasts is that course on which McGouran hover-shreds is actually has metal underneath it; on the surfaces that comprise the vast majority of our infrastructure, the hoverboard would simply be a heavy, immobile board. In fact, aside from its healthy dose of style, the Lexus hoverboard isn’t much different from a dozen lab demonstrations that have taken place over the last few decades.  A highly constrained, not quite original hoverboard is still a hoverboard.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Lexus has finally shown off its real, live, working hoverboard.  That cool-looking steam coming off of the sides isn’t decorative; it’s liquid nitrogen, cooling the superconductors to -321 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature at which they become superconducting. Not surprising, given that riding the Lexus hoverboard is basically like straddling a maglev train. the hoverboard relies on superconductors and magnets. The biggest disappointment for hoverboard enthusiasts is that course on which McGouran hover-shreds is actually has metal underneath it; on the surfaces that comprise the vast majority of our infrastructure, the hoverboard would simply be a heavy, immobile board. In fact, aside from its healthy dose of style, the Lexus hoverboard isn’t much different from a dozen lab demonstrations that have taken place over the last few decades.  A highly constrained, not quite original hoverboard is still a hoverboard.

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The inventor who may kill the power cord

The inventor who may kill the power cord | Wifi hack android | Scoop.it
Meredith Perry is working on a technology that would allow us to walk into any uBeam-equipped room and find that our electronic devices immediately begin charging, writes Marco della Cava in Change Agents.

Via Josepf J Haslam, Richard Platt
DAMskill's insight:

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

more...
Arturo Gil Mendoza's curator insight, August 1, 2015 9:19 PM

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

Claire Teninges's curator insight, August 2, 2015 5:34 AM

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."

graham j. passmore's curator insight, August 2, 2015 7:57 AM

Here's how it works. uBeam's transmitter is a wafer-thin square the size of a salad plate that punches out ultrasonic frequencies much like a speaker creates sound. The receiver, currently in the form of a smartphone case, resonates at the same high frequency and turns that imperceptible movement into energy, charging the phone.

uBeam's transmitter doesn't go through walls, so a square tile is required for each room. Although uBeam is still a few years from being consumer-ready, Perry is convinced her "competitively priced" creation will find its way into our homes and any commercial space where devices are used.  

According to CEO Meredith Perry  "What I've seen over the years is people making tiny improvements in existing technology as opposed to saying, 'Let's throw this all out and do something new,'" she says. "I know the odds are so against me. But I wouldn't start a company and bust my (rear) for years unless we were working on something orders of magnitude better than anything else out there."